Tag: work

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Employees To Get Permanent Work From Home Through Summer 2021

KEY POINTS

  • 90% employees don’t want to a rigid office schedule: Dropbox’s internal survey
  • Employees can make their own schedules in the new ‘virtual first’ policy
  • Dropbox will set up collaboration spaces called ‘Dropbox Studios’ 

Cloud services company Dropbox is allowing its employees to work from home permanently, as part of its new ‘virtual first’ approach, it announced Tuesday in a blog post.

All employees of Dropbox have been working from home since March when the pandemic triggered lockdowns. This mandatory work-from-home policy has now been extended until June 2021. The change comes after an internal survey by the company suggested that nearly 90% of employees feel productive at home and don’t want to return to a rigid five-day in-office workweek.

Dropbox is the latest to join technology companies including Microsoft, Twitter, Slack, and Facebook to announce permanent work-from-home policies.

“Remote work will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work,” Dropbox said in the blog post.

With the coronavirus pandemic upsetting the conventional work culture around the world, Dropbox is using the opportunity to introduce changes to its internal working.

In the blog post, the company said it would be changing its current offices into flexible co-working spaces — Dropbox Studios — designed especially for collaboration rather than solo work. The utilization of the co-working spaces in San Francisco, Seattle and Austin, and Dublin in Ireland, will depend on the teams’ needs. More co-working spaces could be set up if they turn out to be successful.

The company is also introducing ‘non-linear workdays,’ allowing employees to make their own schedules between time zones beyond Dropbox’s core collaboration hours. Dropbox will also facilitate employees’ relocation to other cities where it has offices.

“As our workforce grows more distributed, this will help balance collaboration with

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

How A Pandemic Pushed Us To Embrace A Long Overdue Future Of Work

Founder & CEO of SlicedBrand, a global PR agency with an award winning team, she’s successfully led PR for thousands of technology companies

The pandemic has created a new thought process to reconcile when it comes to how we physically operate as a business. I immediately recognized that the fear of unleashing employees faded, if only out of necessity. Optimism grew, and ultimately everything new started to just seem normal. Now, it’s hard to even picture the days of our old office-bound lives.

Approximately six months into a forced remote office experiment, here are a few of the things I’ve learned.

My employees don’t need an office to be productive.

While I’ve been able to run a brand completely remotely, widespread adoption of a complete work-at-home workforce hasn’t been as rapid as industry leaders may have hoped.

The novel coronavirus kicked into overdrive the move to a fully or mostly remote staff. Managers may have noticed a slight downturn in productivity as employees adjusted, but everyone needs a second to acclimate. The shift from an office to your dining room table — complete with kids running amok, Amazon deliveries and breaks to take the dog outside — comes with a side of chaos. 

The truth is that if you hire the right people and train the right people, then your employees will likely be productive wherever they sit. Mine are all over the world, and there is no lack of productivity or engagement with the work. 

I think we’ll see that over the longer term, productivity will prove to be a benefit of a work-at-home environment. In our current experiment, I realize that we really don’t have a choice but to let workers figure it out at home. And they have been. In a survey of more than

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

The list of PS4 games that don’t work on PS5 just got shorter

A few days ago, Sony revealed that 99 percent of PS4 games will be compatible with the PS5 and that there are very few titles you can’t play on the upcoming console. Now, the list of 10 just got shorter. NACON and KT Racing told Push Square that they’re developing a patch that would make TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 PS5-compatible. A NACON rep told the publication that the developers are working to make the motorbike racing game 100 percent functional on the new console, though it’s unclear if they’ll be able to roll out the update by the time the PS5 comes out on November 12th.



a person riding a motorcycle on the side of a road: TT Isle of Man - Ride on the Edge 2


TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2

Ride on the Edge 2 isn’t the only game in the original list that will receive a compatibility update, though: As GamesRadar+ noted, you’ll also be able to play high-speed shooter DWVR on the PS5. A developer for the game recently announced on Reddit that Mad Triangles is working on a patch and that they’re hoping to release it before the PS5 arrives.

The companies’ announcement opens up the possibility that the other titles will also be playable on Sony’s next-gen console. While the short list could dwindle even further, there’s one game that will never get an update: Shadwen. Its developer told Push Square that the stealth game’s loading screen freezes up on the PS5, and since it uses an older engine, the company can’t work on on a patch anymore.

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13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Molokai slow internet causing problems for education, work

HONOLULU (AP) — Slow internet service has become an increasing problem for Molokai residents on Hawaiian Home Lands properties.

Service provided by a single telecom provider has caused difficulties for residents working at home or families engaged in distance learning, Hawaii Public Radio reported Monday.

Sandwich Isles Communication secured an exclusive license with the state Department of Hawaiian Home Lands in 1995 to bring telecom services to rural homestead communities. In return, other companies must use and pay for the Sandwich Isles infrastructure to reach customers.

Sandwich Isles founder Al Hee was convicted of federal tax fraud, served nearly four years in prison and faces nearly $50 million in fines for defrauding the U.S. government. The company was stripped of $257 million in assets.

Democratic state Rep. Lynn DeCoite, who represents Molokai, said she has received numerous complaints from homesteaders.


“Anger, frustration. You can’t even get through to a live body to talk about what the situation is, or negotiations of how they can have their bills paid, or you can transfer over to another carrier,” DeCoite said.

Hawaiian homesteader Kui Adolpho said her only option for service in Hoolehua is Sandwich Isles, but frozen screens and constant buffering are a daily ordeal for her three children taking elementary school classes at home.

Adolpho also works from home, adding to the strain on limited bandwidth.

She began an online petition to raise awareness about the problems, noting that some homesteaders have to pay for internet hot spots to obtain adequate service.

“I expected lags and, you know, the occasional interruptions. But it got to the point where my children couldn’t even get instruction at all,” Adolpho said.

Sandwich Isles said it is aware of the problems with internet speed and plans to upgrade its infrastructure.

The company also said it

12
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Top remote work tools for productivity, via GitHub, GitLab, Facebook

  • With remote work a long-term reality for many companies, tools to help employees work productively from home are critical. 
  • StackShare shared which tools are most popular on its platform, while execs from companies like Facebook, GitHub, Gitlab, and Atlassian also dished on their go-to products. 
  • It’s not just about the specific tools, though, it’s about how they’re used — including to keep company culture alive. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Because of the pandemic, remote work has become the new normal for many tech companies. 

Firms like Facebook, Twitter, and Atlassian are allowing employees to work remotely permanently, if they wish — a practice already adopted by startups like GitLab — and adapting to new productivity products in the process. It’s not just about the tools a company uses though, but also how they use them. 

StackShare, a website for companies to share what apps they use, has seen more traffic during the pandemic on its pages for remote work tools like Zoom and Google Meet. 

“The most popular tools that we’ve seen on StackShare throughout this whole pandemic have been the ones that help keep culture — help you keep that alive,”  Yonas Beshawred, founder and CEO of StackShare, told Business Insider. 

Execs from GitLab, Facebook, GitHub, and more shared the tools that they’ve been using to help employees make remote work work:

Companies are turning to video conferencing tools like Zoom and even Discord

StackShare users often look up comparisons between Google Meet and Zoom, says Yonas Beshawred, founder and CEO of StackShare.

“Zoom is really popular of course, but people have all sorts of issues with it, whether it’s security or costs,” Beshawred told Business Insider. “The fact that it’s still being compared to alternatives means there’s still demand for better video chats or video