Tag: Web

11
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Microsoft’s Apple workaround: How Xbox could bring Project xCloud to iOS via the web in 2021

Project xCloud, as shown at the Xbox E3 Showcase in the Microsoft Theater at L.A. Live, Sunday, June 9, 2019 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Casey Rodgers/Invision for Xbox/AP Images)

Microsoft is working on a browser-based edition of its cloud gaming service Project xCloud, according to multiple reports. Business Insider reported that Xbox chief Phil Spencer told Microsoft employees at a meeting Wednesday that the company will pursue a “direct browser-based solution” for bringing the cloud-based, multi-platform version of its Xbox Game Pass subscription service to Apple’s family of devices. The Verge cites unnamed sources confirming the plans.

This news comes almost a month after Apple launched a new set of rules for its App Store in September. It would have allowed Microsoft to officially bring an xCloud app to iOS, but only if each game on the service was submitted to Apple as a separate playable app. As there are dozens of games on the Game Pass at any given time and they rotate in and out of the service monthly, this was essentially a case of Apple setting up a logistically-infeasible series of hoops for Microsoft to jump through. Naturally, Microsoft opted to decline.

According to Apple, this was done to make sure that Microsoft’s library of games on Game Pass all individually meet Apple’s stringent guidelines for the App Store. According to everyone else, it’s another case this year of Apple using its policies as a weapon against competitors. If xCloud (and similar services such as Google Stadia) were available in the App Store, that would provide a natural competitor for Apple’s own subscription service, Apple Arcade. If Apple were to follow its own stated policies, then Apple Arcade could not exist on the App Store in its current format.

(Microsoft Photo)

While Microsoft has reportedly not

09
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

Picture this.

You’ve spent a ton of time designing your website.

You’ve picked an attractive theme, added stunning images, and crafted compelling copy.

You’re sure visitors will love it (and you).

The only problem?

You aren’t getting any visitors.

In fact, your site is nowhere to be seen on Page 1 (or even #2 or #3) of Google.

What’s going on?

Well, here’s the thing.

Your web design might be the reason your site is ranking so low in search engines.

Ready to turn things around?

What follows are 10 of the most common web design mistakes that may be hurting your SEO efforts and your rankings – and how to avoid them.

1. Poor Website Navigation

Ever visit a website and have no clue what to do next?

You know, something like this.

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

I bet it had you running for the hills in panic.

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You don’t want your own visitors to do the same.

Right?

Instead, you want them to know exactly what to do at a glance.

Plus, you want Google’s web crawlers to understand your site.

To achieve this, make sure to prioritize internal linking between your important pages.

2. Slow Page Load Speed

People in the online world move at lightning speed.

They’re constantly zipping through social media, hammering away at emails, and zooming past a ton of generic headlines on the SERPs.

This means if they take the time to click on your site, and it takes forever to load, they’ll be gone before you know it.

After all, you didn’t invent the Keto diet or men’s wool socks.

There are other websites with the same information you have.

If you want your visitors to stay?

Make sure your pages load in three seconds or less.

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

The scary part is the

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Microsoft is bringing xCloud to iOS via the web

Microsoft is working on a “direct browser-based solution” to bring xCloud to iOS early next year. Sources familiar with Microsoft’s plans tell The Verge that the company has been developing a web version of xCloud to run on iOS and iPadOS devices, alongside continuing its work on an app that it hopes will also eventually run on Apple’s platform.





Microsoft’s gaming chief, Phil Spencer, revealed the company’s browser-based xCloud work during a recent internal all-hands meeting. “We absolutely will end up on iOS,” said Spencer during the meeting, noting that he “feels good” about the company’s iOS progress. “We’ll end up on iPhones, and iPads with Game Pass.” Business Insider first reported the news of the web version for iOS.

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Apple has been blocking services like xCloud and Stadia from running on iOS devices via its App Store, and recently offered an olive branch to these services with some big restrictions. Apple insists that developers must individually submit their games as separate apps using their streaming tech. Microsoft and Google are free to create a “catalog”-style app that collects and links out to all of these individual apps.

Microsoft wasn’t impressed with Apple’s approach, and xCloud’s potential launch on iPhones and iPads has been left in limbo as a result. We understand Microsoft is targeting an early 2021 release for a web-based version of xCloud for Apple’s devices. This browser version would bypass the App Store, just like Amazon is doing with its new Luna game streaming service.

During the same all-hands call at Microsoft, Spencer also discussed the company’s plans for xCloud on PC. Spencer described PC as a “great opportunity” for both Game Pass and game streaming. Microsoft is now aiming to bring xCloud to Windows 10 PCs in 2021. The software giant has been testing

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Sandvine’s Technology Used for Web Censoring in More Than a Dozen Nations

(Bloomberg) — In Jordan,  Sandvine Inc.’s equipment was used to censor an LGBTQ website. Egypt’s government relied on Sandvine equipment to block access to independent news sites. In Azerbaijan, it was deployed for a social media blackout, current and former employees say.



a group of people holding a sign: Demonstrators hold signs and wave Belarus flags during a protest outside Francisco Partners headquarters in San Francisco, California, on Sept. 18.


© Bloomberg
Demonstrators hold signs and wave Belarus flags during a protest outside Francisco Partners headquarters in San Francisco, California, on Sept. 18.

Last month, U.S. -based Sandvine, which is owned by the private equity firm Francisco Partners,  said it would stop selling its equipment in Belarus after Bloomberg News reported that it was used to censor the internet during a crucial election. In explaining its decision, the company said it abhors “the use of technology to suppress the free flow of information resulting in human rights violations.”

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But the company’s equipment — which is often used to manage the flow of network traffic —  has also been used to censor the internet in more than a dozen countries in recent years,  according to three current, five former employees and company documents.  Those countries include Algeria, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Egypt, Eritrea, Jordan, Kuwait, Pakistan, Qatar, Russia, Sudan, Thailand, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Uzbekistan, according to Sandvine sales records with government agencies and network operators — both private and government-controlled —  seen by Bloomberg News.

In those countries, Sandvine’s website blocking feature has enabled politically motivated filtering of news and social media websites and messaging apps, according to the current and former Sandvine employees, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss confidential transactions.  In addition, Sandvine has continued to provide updates and technical expertise to many of those customers, according to the employees and the documents.

Sandvine declined to comment on specific deals with countries or network providers. But it said in a written statement

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Outlook is down: Microsoft web outage hits users worldwide

Outlook online users around the world are reporting problems accessing the Microsoft service, adding to the woes Office 365 users experienced earlier this week. 

Microsoft at 9am CET, 3am ET, confirmed that users are having issues accessing Exchange Online accounts via Outlook on the web. 

SEE: Office 365: A guide for tech and business leaders (free PDF) (TechRepublic download)

Microsoft initially said users in India are the primary group impacted. However, the company later confirmed on the Microsoft 365 Status Twitter account that the issue is affecting users worldwide. 

Downloaddetector currently indicates the worst impacted regions include the UK, France, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, and India. There are also multiple user reports on Twitter from users in Europe who’ve been unable to access Outlook as the workday begins.  

This new incident follows a six-hour Office 365 failure earlier this week due to an authentication error that prevented users from signing into Office.com, Outlook.com, Teams, Power Platform, and Dynamics365. Microsoft was forced to roll back a recent change that impacted authentication operations for numerous Microsoft and Azure services.   

Microsoft’s Office Service health dashboard also confirms that users of Outlook.com “may be unable to access their email”. 

“We’re collecting additional data from the affected infrastructure to aid in our investigation to determine the cause of impact,” Microsoft said. 

SEE: Office 365 outage with roll back failure ends after more than six hours

Similar to the incident earlier this week, Microsoft said it is investigating recent updates it has made to its service to