Tag: Streamers

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitch Picked Up Most Of Mixer’s Streamers, Report Shows

KEY POINTS

  • Twitch’s share of hours broadcast on major live-streaming platforms saw the biggest increase after Mixer’s shutdown
  • This is despite Mixer’s attempt to funnel its streamers to Facebook Gaming
  • Twitch saw a decrease in viewership in the last quarter while YouTube and Facebook Gaming grew

Despite Microsoft’s efforts to push Mixers streamers to Facebook Gaming, it appears most of them went to Twitch instead, according to a new report.

Before Microsoft shut down Mixer in July, the company tried to direct its streamers and audience toward Facebook Gaming rather than the leading streaming platform. However, a report from Streamlabs & Stream Hatchet indicates that Twitch has become the ultimate beneficiary of Mixer’s closure. 

Twitch’s share of hours broadcast on major live-streaming platforms jumped by over 14.5% in the last quarter. This is nearly identical to the 14.2% market share that Mixer held at one point. The report stated that Twitch “now represents 91.1% of the market share for hours streamed.”

The report, which looked at streaming activity on Twitch, YouTube and Facebook Gaming, directly credits Mixer’s shutdown as the reason for the massive increase.

According to the report, Facebook Gaming only grew by 1% between July and September, from 2.4% to 3.4%. YouTube market share actually shrunk by 1.2%, down from 6.7% to 5.5%.

When Mixer was formally shutting its doors, many of its streamers had already begun sending out links to their respective Twitch pages instead of Facebook Gaming accounts.

Microsoft executive vice-president for gaming Phil Spencer earlier stated that he had no regrets about shutting Mixer down but said he was disappointed that Mixer didn’t achieve what they hoped it would.

Still, it wasn’t all good news for Twitch as The Verge noted that the platforms are actually primarily competing for viewership. In that aspect, Twitch’s market

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Streaming report: Twitch inherits Mixer’s streamers, now has 91% of all content produced

Microsoft abruptly shutting down Mixer back in June has ended up as a boon for Amazon’s Twitch platform.

That’s according to a new report from Stream Hatchet and Streamlabs, which found that Twitch is now the host for more than 91% of streaming content. At the same time, while the overall audience for livestreaming has shrunk slightly from its all-time high back in April, Twitch’s popularity has nonetheless exploded during the pandemic, with nearly double the audience that it had at this time last year.

Independent data analyses in the streaming market focus on tracking hours watched to indicate a platform’s popularity with its audience. Relatively few take hours streamed — the amount of content being produced for that audience — into account. What makes the Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet report interesting is that it does track the latter, and it makes it look a lot like most of the ex-Mixer streamers have ended up landing on Twitch.

Twitch has the most content, but doesn’t have as wide a lead in audience share. (Source: Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet)

In the second quarter of 2020, before its closure, Mixer represented 14.2% of all hours livestreamed. In the third quarter, Twitch’s hours livestreamed grew by 14.5%, to an overall 91.1% share of outgoing content. While it strains credulity to argue that everyone who was making content on Mixer went to Twitch — Facebook Gaming’s own amount of hours streamed went up by 1%, which suggests that Microsoft successfully got at least a couple of its streamers to migrate — Twitch’s 14.5% increase is a massive spike that doesn’t have any other useful explanation.

At the end of last year, the story of the streaming platform market was a four-way race between Amazon’s Twitch, Google’s YouTube Gaming, Facebook Gaming, and Microsoft’s Mixer. Most analyses of the streaming

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitch inherits Mixer’s streamers, now has 91% of all content produced



a close up of a sign: Esports star Shroud returns to Amazon’s Twitch with exclusive deal following Mixer shutdown


© Provided by Geekwire
Esports star Shroud returns to Amazon’s Twitch with exclusive deal following Mixer shutdown

Microsoft abruptly shutting down Mixer back in June has ended up as a boon for Amazon’s Twitch platform.

That’s according to a new report from Stream Hatchet and Streamlabs, which found that Twitch is now the host for more than 91% of streaming content. At the same time, while the overall audience for livestreaming has shrunk slightly from its all-time high back in April, Twitch’s popularity has nonetheless exploded during the pandemic, with nearly double the audience that it had at this time last year.

Independent data analyses in the streaming market focus on tracking hours watched to indicate a platform’s popularity with its audience. Relatively few take hours streamed — the amount of content being produced for that audience — into account. What makes the Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet report interesting is that it does track the latter, and it makes it look a lot like most of the ex-Mixer streamers have ended up landing on Twitch.



chart, diagram: Twitch has the most content, but doesn’t have as wide a lead in audience share. (Source: Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet )


© Provided by Geekwire
Twitch has the most content, but doesn’t have as wide a lead in audience share. (Source: Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet )

In the second quarter of 2020, before its closure, Mixer represented 14.2% of all hours livestreamed. In the third quarter, Twitch’s hours livestreamed grew by 14.5%, to an overall 91.1% share of outgoing content. While it strains credulity to argue that everyone who was making content on Mixer went to Twitch — Facebook Gaming’s own amount of hours streamed went up by 1%, which suggests that Microsoft successfully got at least a couple of its streamers to migrate — Twitch’s 14.5% increase is a massive spike that doesn’t have any other useful explanation.

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At the end of last year, the story of

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitch seems to have picked up most of Mixer’s streamers

Streamers seem to have flocked to Twitch from Mixer after the Microsoft-owned live-streaming service announced plans to shut down in June. A new report shows that Twitch’s share of hours broadcast on major live-streaming platforms jumped up by over 14 percentage points this quarter, taking away the nearly identical just over 14 percent market share that Mixer previously held.

With Mixer out of the picture, Twitch ended up with 91.1 percent of all hours spent streaming on these platforms between July and September, according to a new report from Streamlabs & Stream Hatchet that looked at streaming activity on Twitch, YouTube, and Facebook Gaming. Facebook Gaming grew slightly during that time period, to 3.4 percent from 2.4 percent, and YouTube shrunk slightly, to 5.5 percent from 6.7 percent.

That Twitch won out is particularly notable because Facebook made a serious effort to pick up Mixer’s streamers. It partnered with Mixer to help streamers get set up on the new platform, and Mixer started advertising Facebook Gaming during its final month online. Mixer’s website still forwards to Facebook Gaming today. Evidently, that wasn’t enough to convince Mixer streamers to pick yet another underdog in the streaming space.

“Hours streamed” is a useful metric for determining where streamers are spending their time, but it’s not necessarily the metric that matters. These platforms are primarily competing for viewership, and in that area, Twitch actually lost some ground. The report now puts Twitch at 63.6 percent market share, down from 67.6 percent. That should be particularly concerning because both YouTube and Facebook Gaming grew this quarter; Mixer made up only 1.4 percent of hours streamed, so these services are growing at a faster pace than Twitch.

Streaming viewership has

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Twitch Rolls Out Soundtrack Beta To Give Streamers Rights-Cleared Music

Licensed music has been an issue for many streamers in the past, with takedown notices coming from rights holders and making certain games complicated to stream or post videos of. It’s made streaming games with big licensed soundtracks, like Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2, difficult. Twitch is testing a solution to this issue, an app called Soundtrack By Twitch that will allow streamers to play license-cleared music in their streams.

In a blog post, Twitch has detailed Soundtrack, which has an interface very similar to Spotify. “Soundtrack gives you a curated collection of rights-cleared music and integrates with your streaming software to separate your audio sources, allowing you to keep your channel safe while you create compelling content and grow as a creator,” the post says.

Artists currently available, according to the blog, include Above & Beyond, mxmtoon, Porter Robinson, RAC, SwuM, “and many more”. Claude Von Stroke, Cloudchord, Chrome Sparks, and Tia Nomore are also listed on the Soundtrack website.

The current beta is compatible with OBS Studio v26.0 or later, and compatibility with Twitch Studio and Streamlabs OBS is planned. Streamers can join a waitlist now, and invites to the program will be sent out over email.

This is an issue that streaming platforms seem to be increasingly aware of–Facebook Gaming also recently licensed a bunch of music for streamers. Microsoft, meanwhile, closed down its streaming service Mixer earlier this year.

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