Tag: steps

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Pakistan PM Imran Khan’s Top Aide Asim Saleem Bajwa Steps Down Amid Corruption Allegations

Imran Khan's Top Aide Steps Down Amid Corruption Allegations

Imran Khan rejected Asim Saleem Bajwa’s resignation.

Islamabad:

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan’s Special Assistant on Information and Broadcasting Lt Gen (retd.) Asim Saleem Bajwa resigned on Monday, amid allegations that he used his offices to help family set up several off-shore businesses.

“I requested the honourable prime minister to relinquish me from the additional portfolio of SAPM on Info & broadcasting. He very kindly approved my request,” Bajwa, the former Pakistan Army spokesman who also served as Commander of the Southern Command, tweeted.

However, he would continue working as chairman of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) Authority, Dawn newspaper reported.

The development comes more than a month after Bajwa submitted his resignation to Prime Minister Khan following a report on a website that alleged that he had used his offices in setting up off-shore businesses of his wife, sons and brothers.

However, Mr Khan rejected his resignation at the time and asked him to continue working as his special assistant.

The report alleged that Bajwa’s younger brothers opened their first Papa John”s pizza restaurant in 2002, the year he started working as a Lieutenant Colonel on the General Pervez Musharraf’s staff.

It claimed that his brother Nadeem Bajwa, 53, who started as a delivery driver for the pizza restaurant franchise, another three brothers, his wife Farrukh Zeba and three sons now own a business empire which set up 99 companies in four countries, including a pizza franchise with 133 restaurants worth an estimated USD 39.9 million.

Out of the total 99 firms, 66 are main companies, 33 are branch companies of some of the main companies while five firms are dead now.

The Bajwa family’s companies spent an estimated USD 52.2 million to develop their businesses and USD 14.5 million to purchase properties in the United States, according to

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

7 Simple Steps to Create a Website for Your Small Business



a man standing in front of a window: A web designer working on code in an office.


© Getty Images
A web designer working on code in an office.

Online shopping is a major industry, and that’s an understatement. In the U.S. alone, we’re projected to have 300 million online shoppers by 2023. That’s more than 90% of the entire U.S. population. For any brick-and-mortar store or business, having an online store — or at least an online presence — is essential.

The convenience, speed, and accessibility of the Internet make it appealing to consumers, who use it for product purchases and product research. Your small business site will help you attract and retain customers, generating more profit.

Best of all, building a website no longer requires extensive knowledge of website development, web design, or even coding. You only need to follow a few simple steps.

• Choose a website builder

• Select your domain name

• Decide on a theme or template

• Add plug-ins

• Create pages and content

• Test your site and publish

• Market and maintain your website

Things to consider before beginning to make your website

Building a website is a fairly simple process, but it’s important to start with a solid plan in mind. Consider your purpose, brand identity, and budget before beginning.

1. What is the main purpose of your website?

Like any business endeavor, your website needs a clear purpose. Will your site simply provide information about your company, or will you sell products? The process of creating a website varies slightly depending on your main purpose.

Whatever the purpose of your website, it’s essential to clearly state what your business does on the homepage of your site. Define your purpose, then work on drafting a direct, concise summary of your business. Customers need to immediately recognize whether you can meet their needs.

2. What is your brand

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

IBM’s Spinoff and Restructuring Plans Look Like Steps in the Right Direction

As a long-time critic of the company, I’ll be the first to say that IBM (IBM) still faces its share of competitive and secular pressures. But the planned spinoff of Big Blue’s managed IT infrastructure services business is encouraging news.

First, the managed infrastructure business — though said by IBM to have a $60 billion-plus backlog and more than twice the scale of its nearest rival — is clearly struggling. IBM’s “infrastructure & cloud services” revenue, which is reported within its Global Technology Services (GTS) segment, was down 7% annually in Q2, 6% in Q1 and 5% in Q4. And this is in spite of the fact that this revenue also covers the IBM Cloud public cloud services unit, which appears to be growing.

Secular headwinds — specifically, the adoption of cloud infrastructure platforms much larger than IBM’s, such as AWS and Microsoft Azure — are clearly a factor here. But growth comparisons suggest GTS has also been losing share to rivals such as Accenture (ACN) and Wipro (WIT) . A spinoff that leaves IBM’s managed infrastructure business in the hands of a management team that’s focused solely on running that business just might help turn things around.

Meanwhile, shedding the managed infrastructure business allows new CEO Arvind Krishna and other IBM execs to direct more of their attention towards value-added software, hardware and services offerings. And from the looks of things, that’s what they generally want to do.


Quite a few IBM businesses are seeing revenue declines right now. Source: IBM.

To be sure, the IBM press release announcing the spinoff still contains a lot of the usual Big Blue marketing-speak. Though IBM might now claim to be focused on “its open hybrid cloud platform and AI capabilities,” many of the businesses that aren’t being spun off have nothing

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

6 steps for entrepreneurs to acquire more customers on social media

  • Susie Moore is life coach and advice columnist who’s been featured on Good Morning America, Oprah.com, and The Wall Street Journal. She helps entrepreneurs get hired by getting into the media. Sign up for her free workshop on how to get publicity for your business right here.
  • When used effectively, social media can be a powerful tool to access and sell to audiences instantly.
  • Moore shared six tips on leveraging and revamping your social media profiles to better connect with customers.
  • Start by reviewing all of your profiles. From there, you can tweak and update your profiles based on customer feedback and personal review. 
  • Don’t shy away from consistently engaging with your customers in meaningful ways — respond to comments, share screenshots of testimonials, and create a schedule you stick to.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As a business coach, it’s incredible to observe the opportunity that social media provides businesses of all sizes to access and sell to audiences on demand. 

My dermatologist Leslie Rohaidy fills up her practice debunking skincare myths on Instagram. And another friend, Tracy Campoli, a YouTube star, welcomes new members to her fitness community every week through her short, effective YouTube videos. I’ve also sold thousands of units of my books using Instagram and doing time-bound giveaways (whilst simultaneously spending my own money on hydrating under-eye patches and swimwear after observing influencers singing their praises on Instagram). This stuff works!

Social selling is real. Even better, it’s free to do. 

Here are some simple (but easily overlooked!) tips to move more of whatever you’re selling using your social platforms:

1. Refresh 

Log out of everything. Review all of your profiles from a prospect’s or customer’s point of view. 

Do they present you in the best and most concise way? Is it clear

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Critics call for Facebook to protect democracy with 3 urgent steps

A self-appointed Facebook watchdog group formed by academics and advocates claim the company has not done enough to clamp down on misinformation and protect democracy ahead of the 2020 election.



Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, Oct. 23, 2019.


© Erin Scott/Reuters, FILE
Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, Oct. 23, 2019.

The “Real Facebook Oversight Board” claimed at a virtual press conference on Wednesday that the platform has “actively and knowingly facilitated the flow of poison into the population.” The group said it was formed as an emergency intervention aimed at Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his employees to protect the integrity of the general election.

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“We demand comprehensive action to ensure Facebook cannot be weaponized to undermine the vote and with it American democracy,” said Shoshana Zuboff, a member of the board, author and professor emeritus at Harvard Business School. “History is watching.”

The 24-person board called for Facebook to take three immediate steps in order to protect U.S. democracy. First, it is calling for a ban on all paid advertising mentioning presidential election results in the critical period when the ballots are being counted. It said the ban should run from election night until one candidate is declared president-elect and the other concedes, adding this could prevent violence from breaking out if the results are contested.

MORE: Facebook hit with lawsuit over Kenosha protest deaths

Secondly, the group said there should be “strict oversight” of all posts that mention the presidential election results in the same period, including the labeling of posts about election results as untrue until one candidate is declared president-elect.

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, the board said Facebook should “enforce its own policies” to remove content that incites violence. It cited a recent example in a Facebook campaign ad when