Tag: shows

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Google Podcasts Manager shows you search impressions and clicks from Google Search

Google Podcasts Manager shows you search impressions and clicks from Google Search






// Load the SDK

(function(d, s, id){ var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;} js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Source Article

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

iPhone 12 leak shows off new color option: Get ready for blue

apple-se-logo-6345

Apple’s new iPhones are expected to change from the iPhone X-like design of the past three years.


Angela Lang/CNET

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

Apple’s next iPhone may come in blue, according to a last-minute rumor from well-known device leaker Evan Blass, who posted that tidbit to the internet shortly before the company’s digital event, being held Tuesday at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET.

In his post on the app Voice, which pitches itself as an alternative social network to Twitter that authenticates people are real, Blass showed off what appear to be Apple marketing images for the iPhone 12 Pro Max. He said the phones would come in blue, gold, graphite and silver. Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

The new devices, which are being called the iPhone 12 by the Apple community though the company hasn’t confirmed their names, are expected to be announced Tuesday alongside a possible new smaller smartphone, called the iPhone 12 Mini, as well as a a possible new HomePod, among other things.

CNET’s editors will be covering the event live as it happens, and you can follow along here.


Now playing:
Watch this:

Every iPhone 12 feature we expect Apple to announce



8:34

Source Article

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

NASA efforts had a $65 billion economic impact last year, agency report shows

NASA’s first economic impact report suggests that the agency generated nearly $65 billion in economic impact during fiscal year 2019, with much of that activity coming from the Artemis program to return astronauts to the moon by 2024.



NASA's Space Launch System rocket, or SLS, is just one piece of the agency's "moon to Mars" initiative.


© Provided by Space
NASA’s Space Launch System rocket, or SLS, is just one piece of the agency’s “moon to Mars” initiative.

The agency released the report (which covers the period between Oct. 1, 2018 to Sept. 30, 2019) as it continues negotiations for its fiscal 2021 budget. That 2021 budget request by the Trump administration calls for a 12% increase for the agency to $25 billion, including a substantial contribution to Artemis for a planned 2024 astronaut landing on the moon. That budget has not been approved yet, as both the House and Senate continue markups of their versions of the bill. On Sept. 30, the Senate averted a government shutdown by passing a stopgap measure that will keep the government running until Dec. 11, according to The Hill.

Loading...

Load Error

Related: Beacon of hope? NASA sees inspiration parallels between Apollo and Artemis moonshots

The new study, which you can read on NASA’s website, was conducted by the Nathalie P. Voorhees Center for Neighborhood and Community Improvement at the University of Illinois at Chicago. 

“In this new era of human spaceflight, NASA is contributing to economies locally and nationally, fueling growth in industries that will define the future, and supporting tens of thousands of new jobs in America,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a statement. “With an investment of just one-half of 1% of the federal budget, NASA generates significant total economic output annually.”

The report estimates that NASA supported more than 312,000 jobs across the U.S., including 69,000 jobs in the agency’s “moon to Mars” initiative, which includes Artemis.

11
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Elf on the Shelf TV Shows, Movie, and Specials on Netflix

Gather your holiday helpers around the TV! Netflix recently announced it will be airing a slew of brand-new Elf on the Shelf programs for preschoolers this year. According to a press release, Netflix has partnered with The Lumistella Company to create a collection of both animated and live-action movies, series, and specials centered on the beloved elf and his pals.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Netflix to create immersive and engaging original stories of Santa’s North Pole while providing heartfelt family-entertainment to fans all over the world,” Chanda Bell, Co-CEO and Chief Creative Officer of The Lumistella Company, said in a press release. “We are also pleased that fans in North America don’t have to wait to delve into the world of The Elf on the Shelf and their friendly Elf Pets, with the streaming giant carrying our newest animated Elf Pets titles this Christmas. We relish the opportunity to collaborate with Netflix to bring joyful family moments to life. This moment is a dream come true.”

Although we don’t have a set date for this elf-inspired original programming just yet, we have a feeling your little ones will be stoked! In addition, two existing animated short films, Elf Pets: Santa’s Reindeer Rescue and Elf Pets: A Fox Cub’s Christmas Tale, will also be available to stream this holiday season! Parents who are looking for more family-friendly Netflix programming can also check out this comprehensive list of flicks for kids.

Image Source: Netfix

08
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Frontier’s Bankruptcy Shows Why ISPs Shouldn’t Be in Charge of the Internet

Let’s state the obvious: Internet in the U.S. sucks. Unless you already have fiber, you’re probably stuck with cable, DSL, or no internet at all because no ISP wants to expand into your area. If you live in a rural area and are lucky to get some form of broadband, you’re probably paying an exorbitant amount for slower than molasses speeds. And most people, about 83.3 million according to a recent report from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR), can only access broadband through a single provider. There’s no incentive for major ISPs to actually offer their customers good service. Instead, their focus is on short-term profits—even if that means leaving money on the table and customers on DSL.



a man talking on a cell phone: David Palencia from JFK helps Angel, 13, to connect his computer to the Wifi Hotspot provided by a parked van from JFK Transportation in order to follow his online classes, September 16, 2020, in Santa Ana, California.


© Photo: Valerie Macon / AFP (Getty Images)
David Palencia from JFK helps Angel, 13, to connect his computer to the Wifi Hotspot provided by a parked van from JFK Transportation in order to follow his online classes, September 16, 2020, in Santa Ana, California.

Our own Alex Cranz and Brian Kahn recently spoke with Electronic Frontier Foundation special adviser Cory Doctorow about how ISPs continue to wreck their own internet service, overcharge customers, shut out competition, and leave a significant chunk of urban and rural America pleading for more affordable and better broadband. (You can listen to this first episode of the System Reboot podcast here.) The podcast is a nice overview of the problems with ISPs, but I wanted to dig a bit further into one key element of Doctorow’s focus in the episode: The case of Frontier’s bankruptcy. It’s especially illuminating when it comes to tracing the steps of how ISPs got this monopolistic power over consumers and continue to wield it to absolute ill effects.

Loading...

Load Error

The Internet Is Broken, and ISPs Are to Blame

As