Tag: short

14
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Moj Launches World’s First Short Music Album With Internet Music Sensation Ritviz



a man standing in front of a building


© Kritika Vaid | India.com Entertainment Desk



Moj is an Indian video platform app just like TikTok that is created for netizens to showcase their creative talents. The app has started a campaign #MojwithRitviz. Ritviz is an internet music sensation and has been creating music for over the past five years. Some of his biggest hits include songs like Udd Gaye, Liggi, Jeet and Sage, each clocking over 20 million views. Most recently he was part of a mini-series documenting life in the lockdown. He has over 1.5 million subscribers on his YouTube channel. The hashtag already saw over 200 million video plays, with celebrity influencers like Aadil Khan, Mukti Mohan, Shivani Kapila and many more have participated in the campaign. While launching his album on Moj, Ritviz said: “It has been a great experience collaborating with Moj, especially given the restraints of the 30-second timeline for the songs. Keeping the audience and the trajectory of the app in mind, I am hopeful of connecting the right chord with the youth. It’s young and funky while being soulful at the same time. The songs are a fusion while being unconventional. I have full faith that users on Moj will love these tracks and create some amazing content around them.” Moj is a home-grown regional language social media app just like TikTok and was developed in 30 hours, and reached 50 million users in 30 days. The Moj app is available in 15 Indian languages Hindi, Telugu, Marathi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Malayalam, Bengali, Tamil, Kannada, Odia, Bhojpuri, Assamese, Rajasthani, Haryanvi and Urdu.

Moj was launched on Google Playstore on July 1 and has consistently ranked among the top apps on it. It is a Made in India app and the description on the play store reads as: Moj aims to bring a

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

WFH tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella: Regular breaks, short meetings, and other advice

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota)

Schedule super quick meetings just to check in with colleagues. Read more. And try to fit “moments of transition” into your daily schedule.

Those are some tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to help manage well-being with the new WFH lifestyle.

Nadella spoke this week at the Wall Street Journal’s CEO Council. He said he’s focused on three major considerations of how the nature is work is changing amid the pandemic: how collaboration happens, how learning happens inside companies, and how to ensure employees aren’t burning out.

The last point has become even more important over the past several months as workers conduct multiple meetings per day via video and don’t have the same interactions with colleagues at a physical office. Microsoft studies show that people are now working after hours and on weekends more frequently, and that remote work is leading to more stress and mental fatigue.

Nadella said people can get more tired because of the concentration required during video calls. That’s why Microsoft earlier this summer rolled out the new Microsoft Teams “Together” mode, a feature for video meetings that places participants against a shared virtual background, out of the traditional grid view, to help create the perception of sitting together.

Nadella also called out the new “virtual commute” feature for Teams, which uses automation tech to help users close out tasks and designate work for the following day, log their sentiment about the work day, and direct them into a guided meditation process. Microsoft said its research finds that the blurred lines between work and home are hurting remote workers’ feelings of well-being.

Whether it’s the bus ride to and from work, or even walking down a hallway for your next meeting, there are fewer “transition times”