Tag: Shipping

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple may stop shipping power adapters with iPhone SE, other current devices

Apple is expected to ship new “iPhone 12” models without an AC power adapter, but it could also do the same for previously released devices like the iPhone SE.

The lack of a charging brick in the box is said to be a cost-saving move for this year’s iPhone models. Apple also stopped shipping power adapters with the Apple Watch Series 6, citing environmental reasons.

In a tweet on Tuesday, Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman suggested that the Cupertino tech giant would also stop shipping charging bricks with previously released iPhone models that “it’ll keep selling.”

Although Gurman doesn’t specify, his prediction suggests that Apple will — or already has — change the packaging for current iPhone models to reflect the absence of the charging accessory.

The Bloomberg reporter specified that Apple would nix the power adapter for the iPhone SE, as well as other pre-“iPhone 12” models that it’ll continue selling as part of its updated lineup. At this point, it isn’t clear which current iPhone models will continue to be sold alongside the updated “iPhone 12” lineup besides the iPhone SE.

Additionally, it’s unclear if Gurman’s prediction is simply a guess or actually based on actual leaked information. Gurman didn’t say whether he received the idea from an outside source.

Apple has long been rumored to be pivoting toward wireless charging for its flagship iPhone devices, and analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has forecast that the company could switch to a “completely wireless experience” by 2021. Apple is also rumored to be developing some type of small wireless charging adapter in lieu of AirPower.

The

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Amazon is facing a ‘high-stakes shipping gauntlet’ just months after recovering from widespread delays, as it attempts to pull off its biggest Prime Day ever



a person riding on the back of a truck: Amazon is bracing for its biggest Prime Day ever. Sean Gallup/Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Amazon is bracing for its biggest Prime Day ever. Sean Gallup/Getty Images

  • Amazon’s 48-hour Prime Day event started early Tuesday morning. 
  • Moody’s analyst Charlie O’Shea told Business Insider that Prime Day will serve as a litmus test to see if Amazon is able to keep up with its exponential growth.
  • The sales event will trigger a surge in orders that will weigh on Amazon’s delivery network, with Moody’s estimating that the company’s fourth-quarter shipping expenses could reach nearly $20 billion.
  • “They’re doing the best they can,” O’Shea said. “It’s almost like trying to plug a dam with your finger.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon just kicked off what Moody’s says will likely be the biggest — and most challenging — Prime Day of all time. 

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The e-commerce giant’s 48-hour Prime Day began early on Tuesday morning. The annual sales event is later than usual this year, with Amazon postponing Prime Day due to the coronavirus pandemic. But Amazon’s decision to delay the massive day of sales does not guarantee the company will be able to escape a tangle of logistical challenges and shipping delays — which could infuriate customers. 

“With the 48-hour window for Prime ‘Day’ imminent, and Amazon sure to face logistical challenges due to the inevitable surge in orders, the online leader is once again facing another high-stakes shipping gauntlet,” Moody’s analyst Charlie O’Shea wrote in a report on Monday. 

O’Shea told Business Insider in an interview that Prime Day is the lastest litmus test for Amazon’s exponential growth.

The competitive landscape “has never been tougher,” O’Shea said, as rivals like Walmart, Target, and Costco have thrived during the pandemic in part because of their ability to mix online sales with brick-and-mortar stores. Amazon, meanwhile, struggled with delays

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Maersk Raises Outlook as Shipping Giant Sees Demand Rebound

(Bloomberg) — A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S raised its full-year guidance amid a recovery in demand and sweeping efforts to cut costs.



a large ship in the background: Inside DP World Plc London Gateway Port


© Bloomberg
Inside DP World Plc London Gateway Port

The container shipping company, which is eliminating hundreds of jobs, said earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization will be in the range of $7.5 billion to $8 billion, before restructuring and integration costs. That compares with an earlier forecast of $6 billion to $7 billion, according to a statement.

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“The upgrade underlines the strong earnings momentum,” Brian Borsting, a credit analyst at Danske Bank A/S, said in a client note.

Copenhagen-based Maersk, which transports about 15% of the globe’s seaborne freight, said there was a “continued recovery in demand” in the third quarter. It reported revenue of $9.9 billion for the quarter, and an EBITDA before costs of $2.4 billion.

Maersk is undertaking a major restructuring as the world’s biggest shipping company grapples with the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. It’ll take restructuring costs of around $100 million in the third quarter related to around 2,000 job cuts, as it reorganizes its ocean and logistics and services operations.

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The almost 20% increase in the full-year EBITDA guidance means analysts are likely to materially upgrade their estimates, Jefferies analyst David Kerstens said in a note.

Read More: Maersk Plans Major Restructuring Affecting Thousands of Jobs

The upgrade could also be more good news for holders of Maersk debt, as the borrower may see a change in the negative outlook that it’s been assigned by S&P Global Ratings, according to Danske’s Borsting. Moody’s Investors Service already recently lifted its outlook to positive, he

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Second Cyber Attack in a Week Hits Global Shipping Industry

(Bloomberg) — Supply Lines is a daily newsletter that tracks Covid-19’s impact on trade. Sign up here, and subscribe to our Covid-19 podcast for the latest news and analysis on the pandemic.



A vessel loaded with shipping containers is docked at the Yangshan Deepwater Port in this aerial photograph taken in Shanghai, China, on Sunday, July 12, 2020. U.S. President Donald Trump said Friday a phase two trade deal with China isn't under consideration, saying the relationship between Washington and Beijing has deteriorated too much.


© Bloomberg
A vessel loaded with shipping containers is docked at the Yangshan Deepwater Port in this aerial photograph taken in Shanghai, China, on Sunday, July 12, 2020. U.S. President Donald Trump said Friday a phase two trade deal with China isn’t under consideration, saying the relationship between Washington and Beijing has deteriorated too much.

The global shipping industry sustained a second cyber attack within a week that’s raising concern about disruptions to supply chains already straining to move goods heading into the usual peak season for consumer demand.

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The International Maritime Organization, a United Nations agency that serves as the industry’s regulatory body, said in a statement Thursday it has suffered “a sophisticated cyber attack against the organization’s IT systems.” A number of IMO web-based services are currently unavailable and the breach is affecting its public website and internal systems, it said.

That attack followed the disclosure earlier this week by closely held CMA CGM SA, the world’s fourth-biggest container liner by capacity, that its information systems were compromised. The Marseille, France-based company said Thursday that offices are “gradually being reconnected to the network thus improving the bookings’ and documentation’s processing times.”

“We suspect a data breach and are doing everything possible to assess its potential volume and nature,” the company said in an emailed statement. CMA CGM is among the world’s five leading container liners that account for 65% of global capacity, according to Alphaliner data.

A ‘Headache’

A rash of cyber incidents has afflicted the shipping industry in recent years, the biggest of which was an intrusion that cost Copenhagen-based A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S