Tag: Send

12
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

How to send photos or other files on Skype using a computer or mobile device



a woman sitting on a chair: How to send photos or other files on Skype using a computer or mobile device


© Luis Alvarez/Getty Images
How to send photos or other files on Skype using a computer or mobile device

  • You can send any kind of file using Skype on your desktop. On your phone, you can only send photos.
  • To send files on the Skype desktop app, you can simply drag files into the app.
  • Skype has a 300 MB limit on files that can be shared.

Skype makes it easy to share files with your contacts, whether you’re in a chat, conference, or call. On a desktop computer, you can share any kind of file, but if you’re using a phone, your options are more limited.

How to send files on Skype using the desktop app

Open the Skype app and begin a text chat with the person you want to share a file with.

There are two ways to share the file:

  • Find the file on your desktop and drag it into the Skype app. You should see a message in Skype that says “Drop file or contact details to send.” After you drop the file in the app, click the Send message arrow to complete the transfer.



graphical user interface, application, PowerPoint


© Dave Johnson/Business Insider


  • If you prefer, click the “Add Files” icon to the right of the text message field. In the “Open File” window, choose the file you want to send and then click “Open.” Click the “Send message” arrow to complete the transfer.

You can send more than one file at a time, but note that you have a maximum file size limit of 300MB. If you try sending larger files, you will see an error message.

Also, if you are in a video chat or conference meeting, you need to open the chat window to send a file.

How to send files on Skype using the mobile

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter, Facebook to Send CEOs to Senate Hearing on Section 230

Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

(Bloomberg) — Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities.

A Senate panel voted to subpoena the heads of Twitter, Facebook and Alphabet Inc.’s Google for an Oct. 28 session focusing on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a provision that protects the companies from lawsuits over user-generated content. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg have agreed to attend voluntarily, their companies said.

The hearing “must be constructive & focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said Friday in a tweet confirming Dorsey’s attendance.

A Google spokeswoman didn’t immediately comment on whether Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai had agreed to attend the hearing. The Washington Post, citing an unidentified source, reported earlier that all three company CEOs would testify.


There’s bipartisan agreement in the Senate that Facebook, Twitter and Google are failing to properly manage content posted by billions of users to their platforms. But lawmakers disagree on the nature of the problem. While Democrats have called out the platforms for allowing misinformation that could affect the election, as well as hate speech and conspiracy theories, some Republicans have blasted the companies for censoring conservative voices and ideas– claims the platforms have rejected.

“Alleged ‘political bias’ remains an unsubstantiated allegation that we have refuted on many occasions to Congress,” Twitter said in a

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Facebook, Instagram Users Will Soon Be Able To Send Each Other Direct Messages

Topline

Facebook will soon allow people on the social media platform to send direct messages to Instagram users and vice versa, the social media giant said in a blog post, signaling the first step in the company’s plan to unify messaging systems across all of its platforms, which also includes WhatsApp.

Key Facts

Instagram’s inbuilt instant messenger will also be updated to include a few additions including selfie stickers, custom backgrounds, and disappearing messages.

The feature will be open to all users by default but Instagram users who may want to keep their chats separate from Facebook may choose to opt-out of the update altogether, although this means they will also not receive all the other new features.

It is unclear as to when the cross-platform messaging will become available to all users, but CNN reported that the feature is presently being “tested in select markets and will expand globally in the coming months.”

The cross-platform integration presently excludes Facebook-owned messaging behemoth WhatsApp which has over 2 billion users worldwide.

Unlike Facebook Messenger and Instagram’s direct messages, WhatsApp features end-to-end encryption that prevents third parties including government and law enforcement from peering into messages in transit.

In 2019, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had outlined a plan that would see his company pivot away from public communications to focus on encrypted private messaging.

Crucial Quote

Responding to a question on WhatsApp integration on Twitter, Facebook’s EMEA Technology Communications Manager Alexandru Voica wrote, “Right now, we are focused on cross-app communications Messenger and Instagram. We are still determining how cross-app communications will work with WhatsApp. WhatsApp will continue to remain a separate, end-to-end encrypted app at this time.”

Chief Critic

After Zuckerberg