Tag: science

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

Tufts University School of Engineering / Noodle Partners

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science | News

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape,

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an AP test in the subject.


More from DA: Why a district launched a middle school for African American girls


And even though female students remain underrepresented in high school computer science courses, the number of students taking AP computer science exams has been growing rapidly, the report found.

Disparities would be better illuminated if schools measured disparities by determining computer science participation by students’ specific race, ethnicity and economic status, rather than by the general term “underrepresented minorities,” the report found.

The report also recommended nine policies states and districts can implement to provide equitable access to computer science:

  • Create a state plan for K–12 computer science
  • Define computer science and establish rigorous K–12 computer science standards
  • Allocate funding for rigorous computer science teacher professional learning and course support
  • Implement clear certification pathways for computer science teachers
  • Create programs at institutions of higher education to offer computer science to
13
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Virtual Conference Inspires Female Computer Science Students

If women are underrepresented in computer science (and they are, by a large margin), you wouldn’t know it from sitting in on the Grace Hopper Celebration. Each fall, for the last 20 years, tens of thousands of women have converged for a long weekend of collaboration, networking, mentoring and commemoration of their contributions to the tech world.

COVID-19 pushed this fall’s convention into a virtual format, but it didn’t prevent the University of Denver’s Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science from sending 26 students (plus seven faculty and one staff member) for free. A private donor and funds from the school’s diversity, equity and inclusion budget covered the costs.

In interviews via email and Zoom, the DU Newsroom asked Anndi Russell, a graduate student in the data science program; Izzy Johnson, an undergraduate pursuing a BS in computer science; and Scott Leutenegger, a computer science professor and the Ritchie School’s director of inclusive excellence, about their experience

What’s it like for each of you as a woman in computer science?

Anndi Russell: My program is more equal in terms of women and men than is true in the larger computing world. But before this, I worked in education for a few years — which is a very female-heavy industry typically — so I know switching into computer science and the tech world is going to be a little different. I’m grateful for having a lot of female classmates right now and people I’ve connected with. We support each other.

Izzy Johnson: As an undergrad, I think I was surprised by how many women were in my classes, but it’s definitely still weighted the other way. At DU specifically, I’ve really enjoyed how many female professors I’ve had. I’ve had some really influential female professors in the Ritchie School.

Scott,

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

How to mandate agility in software development, operations, and data science

Even when leaders proclaim in their townhalls that your organization needs to be more agile and nimble, they can’t mandate it. Your CIO and IT leaders may standardize on practices, metrics, and responsibilities that they describe as agile methodology standards, but they can’t dictate that everyone adopts agile cultures and mindsets.

You can select agile tools, automate more with devops practices, and enable citizen data science programs, but you can’t force adoption and demand employee happiness. IT operations may operate a hybrid multicloud architecture, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that costs are optimized or that infrastructure can scale up and down auto-magically.

So, if you were looking to quickly standardize your agile processes, or to miraculously address technical debt by shifting to agile architectures, or to instantly transform into an agile way of working, then I am sorry to disappoint you. Agility doesn’t come free, cheap, or easily. You can’t manage it on a Gantt chart with fixed timelines.

And while I believe that agility is largely a bottom-up transformation, that doesn’t mean that developers, engineers, testers, scrum masters, and other IT team members can drive agility independently. The team must work collaboratively, acknowledge tradeoffs, and define agile operating principles where there is consensus on the benefits.

So if agility can’t be mandated and requires everyone’s contributions, how do organizations become more agile? In the spirit of agile methodologies, data-driven practices, and adopting a devops culture, here are some ways everyone in the IT organization can drive agility collaboratively.

Make the case for agile methodologies 

Chapter 2 of my book, Driving Digital, is all about going from basic scrum practices to a more comprehensive agile planning process that includes assigning roles and responsibilities, planning multi-sprint backlogs, and standardizing estimating practices. When I work with teams trying to adopt agile