Tag: Quantum

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Intel touts ‘full-stack’ approach to quantum innovation

Intel has used its appearance at the IEEE International Conference on Quantum Computing and Engineering to discuss its “full-stack” approach to quantum innovation, which it has touted spans across hardware, software, and algorithm development.

According to the company, its body of work highlights important advances across those areas, which it said were critical for building scalable commercial-grade quantum systems that can run useful applications. 

Dr Anne Matsuura, director of quantum applications and architecture at Intel Labs, said quantum research within Intel Labs has made “solid advances in every layer of the quantum computing stack”, including with spin qubit hardware and cryo-CMOS technologies for qubit control, and software and algorithms research that she said would put researchers on the path to a scalable quantum architecture for useful commercial applications.

“Quantum computing is steadily transitioning from the physics lab into the domain of engineering as we prepare to focus on useful, nearer-term applications for this disruptive technology,” she added.

“Taking this systems-level approach to quantum is critical in order to achieve quantum practicality.”

As quantum is an entirely new compute paradigm, Intel said it requires a new stack of hardware, software, and algorithms in order to run future applications on a full-scale commercial quantum system.

 “Simulations can help provide an understanding of how to build all components of the full quantum stack, taking workload requirements into consideration before they get built in real quantum hardware,” Intel said. “Quantum research efforts across this stack are all necessary today so that as the hardware matures, useful applications are ready to run on near-term smaller qubit quantum machines.”

This approach, Intel said, is central to its strategy of taking a “systems-oriented, workload-driven” view of quantum computing, which is the foundation of its vision of quantum practicality.

The company presented its quantum research at IEEE, spanning

12
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Commercially Available Silicon Quantum Computer Moves Forward With Quietest Bits On Record

KEY POINTS

  • Physicists achieve a noise level 10 times lower than the previous record
  • Demonstration proves to take a major step closer to a full-scale silicon quantum processor 
  • Next step could be a 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023

The lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit has been demonstrated by a team of quantum physicists, bringing the development of a commercially available silicon quantum computer one step forward to possibility. 

In a study published in Advanced Materials, the physicists said they were able to achieve a noise level 10 times lower than previously recorded for any semiconductor qubit. Specifically, they demonstrated a low-level charge noise of  S0 = 0.0088 ± 0.0004 μeV2 Hz−1. 

As a next step, the team is now looking forward to demonstrating the capability required to produce a reliable 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023. 

“Our team is now working towards delivering all of these key results on a single device – fast, stable, high fidelity and with long coherence times – moving a major step closer to a full-scale quantum processor in silicon,” Michelle Simmons, director for Center for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) and Scientia professor of quantum physics in the Faculty of Science at the University of New South Wales, said in a press release. 

The team explained that, for a silicon quantum computer to perform reliable and applicable solutions, it should generate quantum information close to 100% accuracy. However, achieving such accuracy was impossible due to what physicists call charge noise. 

Imperfections in the material environment that hosts qubits result in charge noise. It impedes the proper encoding of information on qubits, affecting the information accuracy altogether. By separating the qubits from the surface and interface states, the team was able to demonstrate the lowest noise

07
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

IonQ Releases A New 32-Qubit Trapped-Ion Quantum Computer With Massive Quantum Volume Claims

Last May, I had a discussion with Peter Chapman, CEO of IonQ, a start-up quantum computing company.  Before coming to IonQ, Chapman worked for Amazon, where he was responsible for all the technical complexities of Amazon Prime.  IonQ had accomplished a lot in the twelve months that Chapman had been at the helm, so I was looking forward to talking to him. 

My biggest surprise during that discussion was that IonQ was simultaneously working on its next three generations of its trapped-ion quantum computers – 5th, 6th, and 7th generations. 

In a recent follow-up with Chapman, including Chris Monroe, IonQ’s Co-founder and Chief Scientist, we discussed IonQ’s release of its 5th generation quantum hardware.  Keep in mind that the 6th and 7th generations are still in development. Chapman said that each generation would be smaller and more powerful than its predecessor when released.  Although he didn’t mention it, I wouldn’t be surprised if Chapman’s team hasn’t already begun work on IonQ’s 8th generation processor. 

Features of  IonQ’s new 5th generation quantum computer 

A qubit is the fundamental unit of information in a quantum computer. A classical computer bit can only be a one or zero.  A qubit can also exist as a one or zero, but when in a quantum state, it can be a superposition of both values.  IonQIon says its ‘s newest quantum hardware has 32 ion qubits in its latest release, almost tripling the 11 qubits in its previous quantum computer.   

Robert Niffenegger, a Ph.D. and a member of the Trapped Ion and Photonics group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, said he wasn’t surprised at the large jump in the number of qubits. ”Honestly, I think a lot of people were just holding their breath until they [IonQ] announced. They’ve published papers on

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Quantum computing: Photon startup lights up the future of computers and cryptography

A fast-growing UK startup is quietly making strides in the promising field of quantum photonics. Cambridge-based company Nu Quantum is building devices that can emit and detect quantum particles of light, called single photons. With a freshly secured £2.1 million ($2.71 million) seed investment, these devices could one day underpin sophisticated quantum photonic systems, for applications ranging from quantum communications to quantum computing.

The company is developing high-performance light-emitting and light-detecting components, which operate at the single-photon level and at ambient temperature, and is building a business based on the combination of quantum optics, semiconductor photonics, and information theory, spun out of the University of Cambridge after eight years of research at the Cavendish Laboratory.

“Any quantum photonic system will start with a source of single photons, and end with a detector of single photons,” Carmen Palacios-Berraquero, the CEO of Nu Quantum, tells ZDNet. “These technologies are different things, but we are bringing them together as two ends of a system. Being able to controllably do that is our main focus.”

SEE: Hiring Kit: Computer Hardware Engineer (TechRepublic Premium)

As Palacios-Berraquero stresses, even generating single quantum particles of light is very technically demanding. 

In fact, even the few quantum computers that exist today, which were designed by companies such as Google and IBM, rely on the quantum states of matter, rather than light. In other words, the superconducting qubits that can be found in those tech giants’ devices rely on electrons, not photons.

Yet the superconducting qubits found in current quantum computers are, famously, very unstable. The devices have to operate in temperatures colder than those found in deep space to function, because thermal vibrations can cause qubits to fall from their quantum state. On top of impracticality, this also means that it is a huge challenge to scale up

03
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

The Quantum Internet Will Blow Your Mind. Here’s What It Will Look Like

This article appeared in the November 2020 issue of Discover magazine as “The Quest for a Quantum Internet.” Subscribe for more stories like these.


Call it the quantum Garden of Eden. Fifty or so miles east of New York City, on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Eden Figueroa is one of the world’s pioneering gardeners planting the seeds of a quantum internet. Capable of sending enormous amounts of data over vast distances, it would work not just faster than the current internet but faster than the speed of light — instantaneously, in fact, like the teleportation of Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk in Star Trek.

Sitting in Brookhaven’s light-filled cafeteria, his shoulder-length black hair fighting to free itself from the clutches of a ponytail, Figueroa — a Mexico native who is an associate professor at Stony Brook University — tries to explain how it will work. He grabs hold of two plastic coffee cup lids, a saltshaker, a pepper shaker and a small cup of water, and begins moving them around on the lunch table like a magician with cards.

“I’m going to have a detector here and a detector here,” he says, pointing to the two lids. “Now there are many possibilities. Either those two go in here” — he points to the saltshaker — “or the two go in there,” nodding at the cup of water. “And then depending on what happened there, that will be the state,” he says, holding up the black pepper shaker, “that I’m preparing here.” 

Got that? Me neither. But don’t worry. Only a few hundred or so physicists in the U.S., Europe and China really comprehend how to exploit some of the weirdest, most far-out aspects of quantum physics. In this strange arena, objects can exist in two or more