Tag: production

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Production kicks off for fully-electric BMW iX3 in China

BMW’s Brilliance Automotive (BBA) joint venture in Shenyang, China has just birthed its first spawn, the fully-electric BMW iX3.

More than just an upscale urban driver, the ix3 ‘SAV’ (short for Sport Activity Vehicle) is notably the first fully electric vehicle in the BMW X electrified range, and also the first to come with an all-electric drive system for the brand.

BMW equips the all-electric crossover with a high-voltage battery sporting the latest cell technology. With 80 kWh total capacity, the battery can power the car up to 458kms on a single charge under the new WLTP (Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicles Test Procedure) test cycle or approximately 520kms under the less-lenient NDEC (New European Driving Cycle) test. The same electric drivetrain will also be installed in the BMW iNEXT and i4’s 2021 versions.

https://www.bmw.com/
https://www.bmw.com/

As for the rest of the iX3’s performance numbers, the electric motor produces 286hp and 400Nm, while the car itself can accelerate to 100kmph from a standstill in 6.8 seconds, hitting a top speed of 180kmph.

Likewise, BMW iX3 also represents the first time BMW housed the electric motor, transmission, and power electronics in a central assembly.

The iX3 is also the first model produced at its Chinese manufacturing facility in Shenyang destined for other markets outside The Middle Kingdom.

Speaking of the Shenyang facility, it’s distinguished by its combination of intelligent manufacturing, state-of-the-art technologies, a comprehensive quality management system, and a special “zero defect concept” that practically guarantees that the facility meets “globally high market requirements for electric mobility.”

“BBA conducts rigorous testing of everything from the battery to the finished car to guarantee the vehicle safety of the BMW iX3,” BMW elaborated. The German carmaker went on to state that a total of 128 mechanical tests and 994 software functionality tests are

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Production of fully electric Volvo XC40 Recharge now underway

Despite dabbling in plug-in hybrid (PHEV) technology for some years now, Volvo is just building its fully electric car, the XC40 Recharge SUV. The Swedish car maker has announced that production has begun on its first all-battery offering.

“Today is a momentous occasion for Volvo Cars and for all employees here in Ghent,” said Javier Varela, head of global industrial operations and quality, in an October 1 press release. “As we continue to electrify our line-up, the Ghent plant is a real trailblazer for our global manufacturing network.”

To accommodate the new production line, Volvo had to reduce its output of pre-production cars at its Ghent plant. It also had its staff undergo extensive electric car building training to ensure safe production, optimized workflow, and quality manufacture.

https://www.media.volvocars.com/
https://www.media.volvocars.com/

Volvo’s first fully-electric vehicle builds on the stellar safety standards of the original XC40. However, due to the absence of an internal combustion engine (ICE), the engineers had to rebuild the frontal structure from the ground up, complete with added reinforcing and stabilizing beams to ensure the EV still meets the brand’s high safety requirements. This was made possible by the use of the Compact Modular Architecture (CMA), an advanced vehicle platform co-developed within the Geely Group.

Aside from frontal reinforcements, the rear has also been galvanized to better distribute collision forces and direct these away from the cabin.

To keep occupants safe while ensuring the battery is well-protected from a collision, Volvo developed a unique safety structure that includes an aluminum safety cage embedded in the middle of the car’s body structure. This cage creates a crumple zone for the battery to keep it intact in case the unfortunate happens.

The all-wheel drive XC40 Recharge delivers an estimated 400kms of zero-emission travel on a single charge,

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

India and South Africa ask WTO to waive rules to aid COVID-19 drug production

FILE PHOTO: A logo is pictured outside the World Trade Organization (WTO) headquarters next to a red traffic light in Geneva, Switzerland, October 2, 2018. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/File Photo

VIENNA (Reuters) – India and South Africa want the World Trade Organization (WTO) to waive intellectual property rules to make it easier for developing countries to produce or import COVID-19 drugs, a letter here&Open=True to the WTO shows.

In their letter dated Oct. 2 the two countries called on the global trade body to waive parts of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which governs patents, trademarks, copyright and other intellectual property rules globally.

“As new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19 are developed, there are significant concerns (over) how these will be made available promptly, in sufficient quantities and at (an) affordable price to meet global demand,” the letter posted on the Geneva-based WTO’s website says.

The two countries said that developing nations are disproportionately affected by the pandemic and that intellectual property rights, including patents, could be a barrier to the provision of affordable medicine.

The letter asks that the WTO’s Council for TRIPS recommends a waiver to the General Council, the WTO’s top decision-making body in Geneva, “as early as possible”. It does not say how much support India and South Africa have from other countries.

A draft General Council decision text submitted with the letter says the waiver should last an as yet unspecified number of years and be reviewed annually.

Reporting by Francois Murphy; Editing by David Goodman

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30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Simulation model may reduce the climate footprint of oil production

Simulation model may reduce the climate footprint of oil production
The maximum distance permitted for the transportation of oil and gas in the same subsea pipeline will probably soon be increased thanks to a recently developed simulation tool developed jointly by SINTEF and the Norwegian company LedaFlow Technologies. Credit: LedaFlow Technologies

Future offshore oil and gas fields are most likely to be “satellite developments” that are less expensive and emit less greenhouse gasses than other fields because they do not require new production platforms. An innovative Norwegian computational tool called “Slug Capturing 2” is now enabling the design of longer pipelines that will allow many more fields to be developed as satellites.


Out of sight from land and from the air, the Norwegian shelf is covered by a spider’s web of pipelines through which production fluids flow from the wells tapping the reservoirs.

This system carrying oil, water and gas in the same pipeline is called multiphase transport.

Research scientists in Norway have now developed a simulation model designed to meet one of the biggest challenges created by this form of pipeline transport—the formation of slugs. These limit the distance at which a satellite field can be developed from its host facility and require that major safety margins are built into the design of multiphase facilities.

Reducing CO2 emissions

Multiphase technology came into being at SINTEF and the Norwegian Institute for Energy Research (IFE) almost 40 years ago. This technology makes it possible to transport unprocessed oil and gas straight from a field’s production wells to platforms located on neighboring fields or directly to land.

Multiphase transport is the key factor that has enabled fully integrated production facilities to be installed on the seabed. It allows oil and gas to be recovered offshore without the high levels of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions that the construction of new

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

As Apple iPhone 12 release nears, Foxconn ramps up production

  • Foxconn, Apple’s main iPhone assembler, has ramped up iPhone production at its factory in Zhengzhou, China ahead of the expected iPhone 12 launch next month.
  • The factory is working 24 hours per day, offering worker bonuses, and canceling holidays to focus on iPhone production, according to a report from the South China Morning Post.
  • Zhengzhou is often referred to “iPhone City” by locals because of the factory’s massive presence in the city.
  • Apple typically unveils its new iPhones in September, but the company is instead expected to reveal its latest lineup in October after facing delays because of the coronavirus pandemic. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Apple is reportedly ramping up production of the iPhone 12 ahead of its expected launch next month.

The factory in Zhengzhou, China, operated by Foxconn, Apple’s main iPhone assembler, is working 24 hours per day and implementing measures such as offering worker bonuses and scrapping holidays to ensure the new iPhone is delivered on time, according to a new report from the South China Morning Post.

One employee told the paper that workers at the facility had begun working night shifts, while another said overtime shifts had picked up since the summer. Employees have also been asked to cancel upcoming holidays, the report says.

Apple and Foxconn did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s requests for comment. 

Apple is expected to introduce four new iPhone models this year: two smaller-sized versions and two premium editions meant to succeed the iPhone 11 Pro and 11 Pro Max. All four new devices are expected to support 5G connectivity, and the high-end model is said to come with the same Lidar sensor as the newest iPad Pro.

Apple typically reveals its new iPhones in September, but Apple said in July that it expected supply of