Tag: Practices

09
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

Learn best practices for ranking on Google

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the art and science of getting your website and content to show up on Google’s first page. Not only is it a lucrative job on its own, but it’s a skill every marketer should have.

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Whether you’re in marketing, a business owner, or consider yourself inherently tech-savvy, you’ve probably heard the term SEO (Search Engine Optimization) bounced around quite a bit lately — and for good reason. Search engine ranking can be one of the most important factors when it comes to a business succeeding in the digital age.

What is SEO?

SEO stands for “search engine optimization.” It’s the practice of strategizing the content and keywords on a web page and site in order to help it rank on Google, thus driving organic traffic to a website or digital storefront. Modern SEO isn’t about tricking search engine algorithms — it’s about the opposite: delivering the exact content a user is searching for and making the user happy.

Why is it important for you to learn it?

Whether you’re running a business or you’re a content creator, more visitors to your website usually equals more money, be it through business opportunities, revenue dollars, or new customers. Without knowing proper SEO best practices, becoming a top-ranking website on Google can be nearly impossible, which, in the digital era, can be a huge mistake for up-and-coming businesses hoping to catch the attention of new clients or customers.

Learning proper SEO best practices can also be a huge asset for anyone working in the digital landscape, regardless of your past experiences or job titles. The demand

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

US antitrust probe finds ‘alarming pattern’ of innovation-stifling practices

The United States House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee has wrapped up its probe into Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Google, with its 450-page report [PDF], making a slate of recommendations, including those it said would strengthen antitrust laws and restore competition in the digital economy.

“As they exist today, Apple, Amazon, Google, and Facebook each possess significant market power over large swaths of our economy,” Judiciary Subcommittee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) and Antitrust Subcommittee Chairman David N. Cicilline (D-RI) said in a statement.

“In recent years, each company has expanded and exploited their power of the marketplace in anticompetitive ways.

“Our investigation leaves no doubt that there is a clear and compelling need for Congress and the antitrust enforcement agencies to take action that restores competition, improves innovation, and safeguards our democracy.”

The subcommittee kicked off its inquiries over 16 months ago. Democrat Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) said investigations led the subcommittee to the conclusion that self-regulation by Big Tech comes at the expense of communities, small businesses, consumers, the free press, and innovation.

“Our investigation revealed an alarming pattern of business practices that degrade competition and stifle innovation,” Congresswoman Val Demings (D-FL) added.

“These companies have made remarkable advancements that have shaped our markets and our culture, but their anticompetitive acts have come at a cost … competition must reward the best idea, not the biggest corporate account.”

Although not agreeing on who was to blame for allowing “Big Tech” to achieve near-monopoly status, Congressman Matt Gaetz (R-FL) agreed that these “predatory companies” have used their vast size to unfairly harm competition and consumers.  

On Facebook, the subcommittee said it found evidence of “monopolisation and monopoly power” in the social networking market. It also said that of its nearly-100 acquisitions, the Federal Trade Commission engaged in an extensive investigation of just

02
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

3 Advanced SaaS SEO Strategies & Best Practices

The number of SaaS companies grew from 150 in 2011 to 8,000 in 2020 – a 5,000% growth, according to Scott Brinker’s annual Martech 5000 analysis.

It’s getting crowded and competitive.

As a result, basic SEO tactics don’t cut it.

I compiled three of my favorite advanced SaaS SEO strategies in this article, some of which I used during my time at Atlassian myself. (Disclosure: I worked at Atlassian for years.)

Usual Challenges of SaaS SEO

A lot of startups see initial traction with content marketing.

They build a couple of landing pages, get a TechCrunch article, and hit the 1M ARR (annual recurring revenue) mark.

But then they lose momentum.

Conversions and traffic stagnate, the marketing team becomes overloaded, and the attention on paid channels becomes bigger.

Once a business is hooked on paid channels, it’s hard to get off.

And those that get on it too early take away their chance for organic growth.

Sometimes paid channels mask Product/Market-Fit, and the company runs into the “leaky bucket problem” – they have a hard time retaining customers.

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So, the main challenge for SaaS startups is to keep the early momentum going and scale organic traffic.

But title optimization and blog articles are not enough.

They need advanced strategies.

From Basic to Advanced

Don’t confuse advanced SEO tactics with hacks or tricks.

The key is scalability.

Whereas basic SEO tactics may get you on Page 1 of Google for a set of keywords, advanced strategies allow you to tackle hundreds – maybe thousands – of keywords with one format.

The easiest way to push scalability is to create more pages with inventory like:

  • Apps.
  • Integrations.
  • Marketplace format.

This strategy comes with its own technical SEO challenges and needs to fit into the bigger business

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Glassdoor launches employee reviews for diversity and inclusion practices at companies

Glassdoor is now letting employees write diversity and inclusion reviews for companies in a way to make employers more transparent. Employees will be able to rate and review companies on how they treat employees based on race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other underrepresented groups.

In a poll, Mill Valley, California-based Glassdoor, which has ratings on more than a million companies, found that job seekers and employees trust the employees already working at a company when it comes to understanding the state of diversity and inclusion at a company. Glassdoor said that 76% of job seekers and employees today report that a diverse workforce is an important factor when evaluating companies and job offers. The company said these new features are part of its public commitment to leveraging its product and resources to help achieve equity in and out of the workplace.

The Glassdoor survey was conducted by The Harris Poll. It found that job seekers and employees report that disparities still exist within companies with respect to experiences with and perceptions of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. The company undertook the effort after this year’s racial unrest.

“In recent months, many of Glassdoor’s more than 50 million users have been telling us they want more insight into what the current state of diversity & inclusion is like at a company,” Scott Dobroski, spokesman for Glassdoor, wrote in an email. “Then, after the murder of George Floyd, we saw employee reviews talking about diversity, racial justice, and related topics rise by 63% on Glassdoor.”

Because of this, the company knew people wanted more data. “We believe we have a responsibility as a platform and as an employer to help drive equity in society, and we can help to create more equitable workplaces,” Dobroski said.

Job seekers and