Tag: political

14
Oct
2020
Posted in website

When frequent political candidate Chris Young died, he left behind a valuable campaign website

He also left behind a something that no one could have predicted would suddenly become so valuable: his campaign website, wheretovote.com.

The domain, which his wife now owns, used to redirect users to Young’s Facebook page, and is now broken. But in a year where the coronavirus pandemic has created so much uncertainty around voting in next month’s election, political strategists say it’s a shame that a website that could have been used for a good cause – like encouraging people to vote – is blank. And they say a sale of the domain could have fetched a small fortune from advocacy groups or even candidates for office.

“It’s common practice to direct multiple sites like this one to a voter information platform,” said Michael Halle, a former senior advisor to Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign. “It would be great to have this one in the arsenal.”

Unlike the conventional candidate who purchases a campaign website with his or her name in the URL – current Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza uses ElorzaforMayor.com, for example – Young created wheretovote.com on March, 6, 2002, according to domain records. He ran for Providence mayor for the first time that year.

Young initially used the URL to redirect to a GeoCities website that included campaign positions on issues like crime, taxes, education, and affordable housing. In 2006, when he attempted to run for US Senate, lieutenant governor, and mayor all at the same time, the website included an American flag background and the slogan, “Campaign for Justice.” In more recent years, he used his campaign website to advocate for taxing Brown University and posted pictures of his wife and daughter.

Young, who described himself as an electrical engineer and media consultant, remained a fierce anti-abortion advocate right up to his death. He died while driving

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Block political texts and ads on your phone. Here’s how

Election Day is 22 days away and political ads are bombarding your Facebook feed, mailbox and now your text message inbox. Unfortunately, there isn’t a Do Not Text registry that applies to texting the same way it does to phone calls. There is, however, still a way you can attempt to stop political ads from swarming your phone.



a hand holding a cellphone: Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET



a close up of a computer keyboard: Don't click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


© Angela Lang/CNET

Don’t click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


If you’re wondering how the organization got your number in the first place, it’s because all states allow access to voter data for election purposes — so if you’re a registered voter, your information is on file. 

Here’s how to stop the unwanted political texts.

What political campaigns know about you

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Reply STOP to the sender

Usually when you receive a political text message, you can opt-out. You may see a message in the text body like “reply STOP or unsubscribe to stop receiving messages.” Before responding, however, make sure it’s a legitimate campaign number and not a scammer. If you reply to a scam message, it lets the sender know your number is active.

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You may have to text STOP multiple times if several political campaign people are reaching out to you from different numbers.

Filter out the text messages

Your smartphone has capabilities that let you filter out text messages from unknown senders. While this doesn’t stop unknown senders from texting you, it will hide the messages so you don’t have to see them. Here’s how to filter out the messages on iPhones and Android phones .

If you’re an iPhone user, open the Settings app and tap Messages.

09
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Facebook’s alleged indifference of Indian hate speech linked to policy chief’s political bias

Over the past several weeks, there has been an increasing clamour for Facebook to place its India public policy head, Ankhi Das, on leave as the company continues with an audit of its India operations.

The impetus for the audit was an article written by the Wall Street Journal in mid-August. In that piece, WSJ reported that Das had resisted against taking down inflammatory content that eventually sparked rioting in the capital city of Delhi as it was posted by members of the nationalist BJP party. 

The riots left over fifty dead, most of whom were Muslims. It also led to many of these Muslims’ homes being torched.

“The company’s top public-policy executive in the country, Ankhi Das, opposed applying the hate-speech rules to [T Raja] Singh and at least three other Hindu nationalist individuals and groups flagged internally for promoting or participating in violence,” WSJ reported.

These inflammatory posts were reportedly only taken down months after the riots had already occured, and only when the paper approached the company for a statement. 

One of the BJP politicians, Raja Singh, reportedly said that Rohingya Muslim refugees should be “shot”, and had labelled Indian Muslims as traitors while also threatening to destroy their mosques. Singh, who has enshrined a reputation for these kinds of comments, has since denied these allegations and claimed his account was hacked.

The audit was initiated when a group of 54 retired civil servants wrote to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about the WSJ revelation. This call for an audit was then reiterated by a jointly-written letter to Facebook by global civil rights organisations such as the Southern Law Poverty Center, Muslim Advocates, and other organisations in countries such as the UK, US, and New Zealand.

“The audit must be removed entirely from the influence of the India

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Facebook To Pause Political Ads As US Election Day Ends

Facebook on Wednesday said it will stop running political or social issue ads after the US polls close on November 3 to reduce chances of confusion or abuse.

The leading social network also said that any posts prematurely declaring a winner or contesting the count will be labeled with reliable information from news outlets and election officials.

“If a candidate or party declares premature victory before a race is called by major media outlets, we will add more specific information in the notifications that counting is still in progress and no winner has been determined,” said vice president of integrity Guy Rosen.

Facebook and other social networks have been tightening rules as they gear up for post-election scenarios, including efforts by President Donald Trump to wrongly claim victory or contend the outcome is not legitimate.

The California-based internet giant has been under pressure to avoid being used to spread misinformation and inflame social division, as was the case during the presidential election in 2016.

Policies against voter intimidation instituted by Facebook four years ago have been consistently expanded to account for new trends and tactics to intimidate or prevent voting, according to vice president of content policy Monika Bickert.

“As we head into the last days of this election, we know we will see spikes in efforts to intimidate voters,” Bickert said at a press briefing.

Wednesday’s tightening of rules included barring posts that reference weapons or armies in encouraging people to monitor polling places on election day, according to Bickert.

“We will remove statements of intent or advocacy to go to an election site with military language,” Bickert said.

“We will also remove calls to go to polls to monitor if it involves exerting control or showing power.”

Facebook has already banned posts directly urging people to go to

04
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Opinion | In 50 years of PBS programming, content for Americans of all classes and political views

Polling shows the resilience of the reputation PBS has built over the past five decades. Some 68 percent of respondents told YouGov between August 2019 and August 2020 that they have a positive opinion of PBS, making the service more popular than awards-dominating HBO and putting it on the heels of streaming giant Netflix. A Pew Research Center study on polarization and the American media published in January found that PBS is one of just three outlets — from among 30 choices — trusted by Americans of both parties more than they distrust it.

Paula Kerger, the president and chief executive of PBS, says that trust starts close to home. Even if viewers are skeptical of the media writ large, she argues, they trust journalists who are a part of their own community.

Small rural stations are helped by shared branding and programming, while the service’s urban behemoths benefit from the member stations’ insights and roots.

PBS also does more than take kids to the Land of Make Believe and their parents to English country houses. “American Portrait,” for instance, uses audience submissions to power on-air programming and events. This structure relies on two core assumptions: that the lives of ordinary Americans are newsworthy; and that people are interesting to each other, and not simply as objects of partisan contempt or scorn.

Some of PBS’s most popular programming also speaks to fundamental questions that can get steamrolled on more frenetic news networks, or marginalized by channels eager to make “prestige TV” and profits.

In a time of “patriotic education” programs and falling monuments, PBS attempts to navigate a more personal approach to what Kerger calls “a hunger for us to understand where we came from.” The long-running hit “Antiques Roadshow” is about more than the excitement of potentially striking