Tag: Platforms

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple’s iPhone 12 event absent from Chinese social media platforms

  • Apple’s livestream of its iPhone 12 launch event on Tuesday was not available to watch on top Chinese social media platforms.
  • Tencent Video, iQiyi, Bilibili, and Weibo didn’t stream the event.
  • Bloomberg reported that the platforms canceled coverage without explanation.
  • The event garnered massive interest in China, Apple’s second-largest market by revenue, and the iPhone 12 was the top topic on Weibo.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top Chinese social media platforms reportedly pulled their planned coverage of Apple’s iPhone 12 livestream on Tuesday, despite massive interest in the event.

When Apple revealed the iPhone 12, its first 5G phone, video platforms such as Tencent Video, iQiyi, Bilibili, and Weibo didn’t carry the event, despite originally planning to, Bloomberg reported.

The report said the platforms gave no explanation for not showing the event in China, Apple’s second-largest market by revenue.

The iPhone 12 was later ranked the top topic on Weibo, with users posting photos of the new phone.

Bloomberg reporter Yuan Gao said in a tweet that the platforms usually hire translators and commentators to ensure the event is covered late into the night.

 

In an analyst note, financial services and investment firm Wedbush said the news “speaks to the ongoing ‘cold tech war’ tensions between the US and China.”

It estimated that around 20% of iPhone upgrades in the coming year will come from China. 

Representatives of Tencent Holdings, iQiyi, Weibo, and Bilibili didn’t respond to Bloomberg’s requests for comments.

During the event, Apple revealed four new 5G phones, starting at $699. 

Source Article

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Playing a Good Part In Transforming the Future by Building Decentralized Platforms


9 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


In the last decade, decentralized platforms have taken the data world by storm. Top programmers aspire to create more efficient and effective platforms than ever, making the market for these products one of the most competitive in the world. Meet the five APAC entrepreneurs disrupting their industry, transforming the future of decentralized platforms and navigating their way towards digital transformation.

                                    

                                             Simon Kim, Founder and CEO of Hashed

The mind behind Hashed, Simon Kim is a serial South Korean entrepreneur, blockchain thought leader, and evangelist. Previously, he served as the CPO of Knowre, an adaptive mathematics learning platform. Today, Kim balances his distinguished roles of venture partner at Softbank Ventures Asia, member of the 4th Revolution Committee of South Korea’s Parliament, and Director of the Korea Blockchain Association. He also participates in the Busan Blockchain Free Zone committee. Kim is a strong believer in the importance of consumer-centric applications in the blockchain space. Together, with a team of fellow eminent entrepreneurs, Kim co-founded Hashed in 2016.

Hashed is a leading, strategic crypto investment fund operated out of Seoul and the Silicon Valley. The fund’s stated mission is to “discover, invest in, and support innovative decentralized projects”. Hashed’s key selling point is its focus on the “protocol economy”, which it defines as “an economic system where individuals or groups can participate in the economic activities and earn rewards according to their contributions”. Hence, the venture capital fund is significantly involved in community building and developing sustainable token models for the projects it works with. Hashed has a diverse portfolio of investments, of which half are US-based projects, and half are from Asia or elsewhere. Among its Asian investments, two stand out in particular: Line’s LINK and Kakao’s Klaytn.

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

What is QAnon and how are online platforms taking action on it?

(Reuters) – Online marketplace Etsy Inc is removing all QAnon merchandise from its site, a spokeswoman told Reuters on Wednesday, the latest in a series of platform crackdowns on the unfounded and sprawling conspiracy theory. WHAT IS QANON?

  QAnon followers espouse an intertwined series of beliefs, based on anonymous Web postings from “Q,” who claims to have insider knowledge of the Trump administration.

    A core tenet of the conspiracy theory is that U.S. President Donald Trump is secretly fighting a cabal of child-sex predators that includes prominent Democrats, Hollywood elites and “deep state” allies.

    QAnon, which borrows some elements from the bogus “pizzagate” theory about a pedophile ring run out of a Washington, D.C., restaurant, has become a “big tent” conspiracy theory encompassing misinformation about topics ranging from alien landings to vaccine safety.

Followers of QAnon say a so-called Great Awakening is coming to bring salvation.

HOW HAS IT SPREAD ONLINE?

The “Q” posts, which started in 2017 on the message board 4chan, are now posted on 8kun, a rebranded version of the shuttered web board 8chan. QAnon has been amplified on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube, the video streaming service of Alphabet Inc’s Google.

Media investigations have shown that social media recommendation algorithms can drive people who show an interest in conspiracy theories toward more material.

A report by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD) found that the number of users engaging in discussion of QAnon on Twitter and Facebook have surged this year, with membership of QAnon groups on Facebook growing by 120% in March.

Researchers say Russian government-supported organizations are playing a small but increasing role in amplifying the conspiracy theories.

QAnon backers helped organize real-life protests against child trafficking in August and were involved in a pro-police demonstration in Portland, Oregon.

QAnon also looks

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Facebook bans QAnon across its platforms

Facebook said Tuesday that it is banning all QAnon accounts from its platforms, a significant escalation over its previous actions and one of the broadest rules the social media giant has put in place in its history.

Facebook said the change is an update on the policy it created in August that initially only removed accounts related to the QAnon conspiracy theory that discussed violence, which resulted in the termination of 1,500 pages, groups and profiles.

A company spokesperson said the enforcement, which started Tuesday, will “bring to parity what we’ve been doing on other pieces of policy with regard to militarized social movements,” such as militia and terror groups that repeatedly call for violence.

“Starting today, we will remove Facebook Pages, Groups and Instagram accounts for representing QAnon. We’re starting to enforce this updated policy today and are removing content accordingly, but this work will take time and will continue in the coming days and weeks,” Facebook wrote in a press release. “Our Dangerous Organizations Operations team will continue to enforce this policy and proactively detect content for removal instead of relying on user reports.”

The spokesperson said the company believed it needed to limit the “ability of QAnon and Militarized Social Movements to operate and organize on our platform.”

QAnon is a conspiracy theory that grew out of the fringes of the internet and posits that high-profile Democrats and Hollywood celebrities are members of a child-eating cabal that is being secretly taken down by President Donald Trump, and that members of this fictitious cabal will soon be marched to their execution. The conspiracy theory relies on posts from Q, an anonymous user of the extremist message board 8kun, which was formerly called 8chan, who has been wrongly predicting the roundup of prominent Democrats since October 2017.

The Facebook

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Crowdfunding platforms Crowdcube and Seers to merge

Crowdcube founder and CEO Darren Westlake will serve as executive chairman of the merged business. Photo: Crowdcube
Crowdcube founder and CEO Darren Westlake will serve as executive chairman of the merged business. Photo: Crowdcube

The UK’s two biggest crowdfunding platforms have announced plans to merge.

Crowdcube and Seedrs said in a joint statement on Monday they had agreed the terms of a merger. The combined company will be worth £140m ($181.2m).

Crowdcube will acquire Seedrs under the terms, with Crowdcube’s shareholders owning 60% of the combined business. Seedrs investors will receive 40%, reflecting the differing valuations of the two companies. Crowdcube was last valued at £84m and Seedrs is worth £56m. The exact financial terms weren’t disclosed.

“Today’s agreement is an incredibly exciting milestone that will benefit high growth businesses, their investors who believe in their vision and the wider entrepreneurial ecosystem that supports them,” said Darren Westlake, Crowdcube’s founder and chief executive.

“Together with Seedrs, we can accelerate plans to further expand in the UK and overseas, launch innovative new products and improve our customers’ experience.”

Westlake will serve as executive chairman of the combined business. Seedrs chief executive Jeff Kelisky will serve as CEO.

“We believe that you need to be a player of greater scale to serve companies and the investors who support them,” Kelisky said in a statement. “Now is the right time to bring our strengths together, in order to meet our common mission to deliver a step change in the accessibility and efficiency within private company investing.”

The merger is subject to approval by shareholders in both companies, the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority, and the Financial Conduct Authority. The deal is expected to close either at the end of this year or early in 2021.

Seedrs founder Jeff Lyn appears on stage at the 2014 TechCrunch Disrupt Europe/London, at The Old Billingsgate on October 21, 2014 in London, England. Photo: Anthony Harvey/Getty Images for TechCrunch
Seedrs founder Jeff Lyn appears on stage at the 2014 TechCrunch Disrupt Europe/London, at The Old Billingsgate on October 21, 2014 in London, England. Photo: