Tag: plans

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

IBM’s Spinoff and Restructuring Plans Look Like Steps in the Right Direction

As a long-time critic of the company, I’ll be the first to say that IBM (IBM) still faces its share of competitive and secular pressures. But the planned spinoff of Big Blue’s managed IT infrastructure services business is encouraging news.

First, the managed infrastructure business — though said by IBM to have a $60 billion-plus backlog and more than twice the scale of its nearest rival — is clearly struggling. IBM’s “infrastructure & cloud services” revenue, which is reported within its Global Technology Services (GTS) segment, was down 7% annually in Q2, 6% in Q1 and 5% in Q4. And this is in spite of the fact that this revenue also covers the IBM Cloud public cloud services unit, which appears to be growing.

Secular headwinds — specifically, the adoption of cloud infrastructure platforms much larger than IBM’s, such as AWS and Microsoft Azure — are clearly a factor here. But growth comparisons suggest GTS has also been losing share to rivals such as Accenture (ACN) and Wipro (WIT) . A spinoff that leaves IBM’s managed infrastructure business in the hands of a management team that’s focused solely on running that business just might help turn things around.

Meanwhile, shedding the managed infrastructure business allows new CEO Arvind Krishna and other IBM execs to direct more of their attention towards value-added software, hardware and services offerings. And from the looks of things, that’s what they generally want to do.


Quite a few IBM businesses are seeing revenue declines right now. Source: IBM.

To be sure, the IBM press release announcing the spinoff still contains a lot of the usual Big Blue marketing-speak. Though IBM might now claim to be focused on “its open hybrid cloud platform and AI capabilities,” many of the businesses that aren’t being spun off have nothing

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Domestic terrorism suspects who plotted to kidnap Whitmer shared plans in Facebook groups

According to details from a shocking new affidavit, the FBI uncovered a group planning “violent action against multiple state governments,” including a detailed plot to capture or kill Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. The domestic terror group organized across Facebook groups, real-life events and at least two encrypted chat apps that the FBI did not name.

Whitmer, a Democrat, became a major target of pervasive anti-lockdown sentiment on the political right earlier this year when states imposed restrictions to slow the spread of the coronavirus. According to the affidavit, at a June in-person meeting, members of the group “talked about murdering ‘tyrants’ or ‘taking’ a sitting governor.”

Facebook says it played a “proactive” role in the FBI investigation, first reaching out to law enforcement six months ago. The FBI said it became aware of the activity through social media and also relied on an informant to collect information from within the group.

“We remove content, disable accounts and immediately report to law enforcement when there is a credible threat of imminent harm to people or public safety,” a Facebook spokesperson told TechCrunch. “We proactively reached out and cooperated with the FBI early in this ongoing investigation.”

The group sought to grow its numbers, contacting a Michigan-based militia group known as the Wolverine Watchmen that shared overlapping interests. Facebook removed the Wolverine Watchmen group from its platform in June when it purged a number of groups connected to the anti-government boogaloo movement.

“Today we are designating a violent US-based anti-government network as a dangerous organization and banning it from our platform,” Facebook wrote at the time, drawing a distinction between violent boogaloo groups and the “loosely-affiliated” boogaloo movement.

TechCrunch asked Facebook if the individuals connected with the Michigan militia through Facebook groups but the company did not provide an answer to that

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Here’s a first look at Google’s plans for its massive San Jose campus

  • Google released renderings for its massive downtown San Jose campus, which will face final approval in spring 2021.
  • The company’s mixed-use campus, which is in coordination with the city of San Jose, is a departure from prior campuses as more than half of it will be open to the public in some form.
  • The campus includes childcare centers, performative arts centers and ecological viewing stations.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Google releases San Jose campus rendering


© Provided by CNBC
Google releases San Jose campus rendering

Google has released a first look at its next massive campus — and it looks nothing like those before it.

The company released renderings and sketches of guidelines for its mixed-use, 80-acre campus in downtown San Jose, which will house 25,000 employees. More than half of the “Downtown West” 80-acre project — which is being built in coordination with the city of San Jose — will be allocated for residential and public space and include features like childcare centers, outdoor moving screenings and ecological viewing stations. 

“Thousands of conversations helped us hone in to what we really want in a site, which was much less the corporate campus and the financial district and much more a resilient neighborhood,” said Alexa Arena, Google’s district lead for San Jose in a video. “Downtown West is designed to be a true part of the city — the opposite of a traditional corporate campus,” lead urban designer Laura Crescimano said in a statement.

It comes a year after the company filed its initial campus framework, which kicked off formal studies and community feedback discussions.  Last month, Google launched renderings for its new town-like tech campus in Mountain View, Calif., which aims to convert 40 acres of Mountain View land into a mixed-use campus open to local residents.

Silicon Valley tech companies like Facebook and Google have begun departing

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Sensex, Nifty end higher on TCS buyback plans, banking gains

BENGALURU (Reuters) – Indian shares ended higher on Monday as Tata Consultancy Services’ market capitalisation touched 10 trillion rupees ($136.46 billion) on share buyback plans and banking stocks gained after the government said it would waive interest levies on some loans under moratorium.

The Nifty ended 0.76% higher at 11,503.35 and the Sensex gained 0.71% to close at 38,973.70.

IT heavyweight TCS said it would consider a share buyback later in the week when it reports results, sending its shares up as much as 8.1% to a record high of 2,728.1 rupees.

The Nifty IT index rose 3.47%. Shares in TCS, Wipro Ltd and Infosys Ltd were among the top percentage gainers on the blue-chip Nifty 50.

The Indian government had told the country’s top court it would waive the compounding interest component on loans up to 20 million rupees under a COVID-19 support plan, a legal filing showed.

The Supreme court will have its next hearing on the interest waiver case on October 13.

The NSE Bank index ended 0.56% higher, with shares of IndusInd Bank rising as much as 6.5% and Canara Bank Ltd shares closing 0.6% higher.

($1 = 73.2800 rupees)

(Reporting by Philip George in Bengaluru; Editing by Ramakrishnan M.)

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05
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Safety panel has “great concern” about NASA plans to test Moon mission software

Teams at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility move the Core Stage toward a barge in January that will carry it to a test stand in Mississippi.
Enlarge / Teams at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility move the Core Stage toward a barge in January that will carry it to a test stand in Mississippi.

NASA

An independent panel that assesses the safety of NASA activities has raised serious questions about the space agency’s plan to test flight software for its Moon missions.

During a Thursday meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, one of its members, former NASA Flight Director Paul Hill, outlined the panel’s concerns after speaking with managers for NASA’s first three Artemis missions. This includes a test flight of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft for Artemis I, and then human flights on the Artemis II and III missions.

Hill said the safety panel was apprehensive about the lack of “end-to-end” testing of the software and hardware used during these missions, from launch through landing. Such comprehensive testing ensures that the flight software is compatible across different vehicles and in a number of different environments, including the turbulence of launch and maneuvers in space.

“The panel has great concern about the end-to-end integrated test capability plans, especially for flight software,” Hill said. “There is no end-to-end integrated avionics and software test capability. Instead, multiple and separate labs, emulators, and simulations are being used to test subsets of the software.”

The safety panel also was struggling to understand why, apparently, NASA had not learned its lessons from the recent failed test flight of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft, Hill said. (Boeing is also the primary contractor for the Space Launch System rocket’s core stage).

Prior to a test flight of the Starliner crew capsule in December 2019, Boeing did not run integrated, end-to-end tests for the mission that was supposed to dock with the International Space Station. Instead of running a software test that encompassed