Tag: phone

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

How to delete your Facebook account on a computer or phone, and save all your personal data in the process

  • It doesn’t take long to delete your Facebook account on either desktop or mobile.
  • Before you delete your Facebook account, you’ll have the chance to download all your photos, posts, and other data.
  • It can take up to 90 days for Facebook to fully erase all of your data, and if you try to log in within 30 days, you can choose to restore your account.
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Whatever your reason is for deleting your Facebook account, accomplishing the task is a bit easier said than done. Facebook has become so ingrained in our culture, that the prospect of deleting your account can be daunting.

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Before deleting your account, you should remember that many apps operate by logging into your Facebook account. It’s important to make sure to sever all those external connections with Facebook, so nothing crashes unexpectedly once your account is gone. Oftentimes, this will mean creating new accounts within your apps.

Last, you’ll likely want to archive all of your photos, videos, and exchanges since you won’t be able to access those once your account is gone. Luckily, Facebook will give you a chance to do this before you delete.

Once you’ve made sure you’re prepared for a life without Facebook, here’s how to delete your Facebook account using your browser or the mobile app.

How to delete your Facebook account from a desktop browser

This is likely your best option since it best allows you to combine the data download process and the actual deletion. But for those who have already downloaded their data, it’s on par with the mobile experience. Here’s how to get it done through your browser:

1. Log into your account.

2. Click the down carrot in the top-right corner and click “Settings

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Google Pixel 5 review: new phone, old tricks

The amount of effort Google seems to put into its Pixel phones while simultaneously ensuring that they look and feel mundane never ceases to astonish me. The new Pixel 5 is the epitome of this trend, though it’s been present since the beginning.

The Pixel 5 is unassuming. Instead of pushing the state of the art forward, Google has seemingly retreated to simpler, more reliable, and less expensive technology. The Pixel 4 had face unlock, squeezable sides, and a literal radar chip. The Pixel 5 has a simple rear-mounted fingerprint sensor that harkens back to Android phones from 2018, not 2020.

And yet, it’s still a very good phone for $699. It’s not impressive or flashy. By spending just a little (or a lot) more money, you can get better specs, larger camera arrays, prettier screens, and fancier designs. The Pixel 5 is trying to sell something else, sometimes to a fault:

Simplicity.

The Google Pixel 5 in “Sorta Sage” green

The Google Pixel 5 in “sorta sage” green.

Pixel 5 hardware design

Here are words I’ve used to describe Pixel hardware in past reviews, all of which apply to the Pixel 5: utilitarian, humdrum, unassuming, and premium. That last one seems like it doesn’t fit, but once you hold the Pixel 5, you’ll feel it. There’s so little hardware flash that it can be easy to miss some of the design substance.

The Pixel 5 has a 6-inch OLED screen, rounded on the corners and interrupted only by a (somewhat large) hole punch for the selfie camera. There’s no XL version with a bigger screen, which might annoy some

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Which Is The Best Budget 5G Phone?

KEY POINTS

  • Samsung has announced the new Galaxy A42 5G, a budget smartphone with support for 5G
  • The device is cheaper than the OnePlus Nord
  • The Galaxy A42 5G’s specs aren’t top-tier, but its price won’t hurt the wallet

South Korean tech giant Samsung has announced a new 5G smartphone that’s more affordable than the newly-released Galaxy S20 FE – and is even cheaper than the OnePlus Nord.

Samsung has announced the new Galaxy A42 5G, its first budget smartphone offering support for 5G connectivity. The device will be sold for £349 (about $455) in the U.K. and is cheaper than the OnePlus Nord by about £30 since the latter currently sells for £379 apiece. It is the latest in Samsung’s attempts to win a bigger share in the smartphone market, particularly in the budget device category.

The new Galaxy A42 5G boasts midrange specs that are comparable to the ones found on the OnePlus Nord. Here’s a quick look at the new handset’s specs and features:

Processor

As per The Verge, the device is powered by a Snapdragon 750G, a new processor Qualcomm announced just last month. This is backed by 4GB of RAM. The device offers 128GB of internal storage, expandable via microSD card.

It’s worth noting that the device’s processor is not as powerful as the Snapdragon 765G found on the OnePlus Nord, which also has a bigger 8GB RAM.

Display

The Galaxy A42 5G has a 6.6-inch HD+ sAMOLED Infinity-U display, which has a small notch for a front-facing camera. There’s an in-display fingerprint reader for authentication.

Cameras

At the back of the device rests a quad-camera setup comprised of a 48MP wide, 8MP ultrawide, 5MP macro and 5MP depth sensor. At the front is a 20MP selfie snapper.

Battery

The device has a large 5,000

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Block political texts and ads on your phone. Here’s how

Election Day is 22 days away and political ads are bombarding your Facebook feed, mailbox and now your text message inbox. Unfortunately, there isn’t a Do Not Text registry that applies to texting the same way it does to phone calls. There is, however, still a way you can attempt to stop political ads from swarming your phone.



a hand holding a cellphone: Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET



a close up of a computer keyboard: Don't click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


© Angela Lang/CNET

Don’t click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


If you’re wondering how the organization got your number in the first place, it’s because all states allow access to voter data for election purposes — so if you’re a registered voter, your information is on file. 

Here’s how to stop the unwanted political texts.

What political campaigns know about you

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Reply STOP to the sender

Usually when you receive a political text message, you can opt-out. You may see a message in the text body like “reply STOP or unsubscribe to stop receiving messages.” Before responding, however, make sure it’s a legitimate campaign number and not a scammer. If you reply to a scam message, it lets the sender know your number is active.

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You may have to text STOP multiple times if several political campaign people are reaching out to you from different numbers.

Filter out the text messages

Your smartphone has capabilities that let you filter out text messages from unknown senders. While this doesn’t stop unknown senders from texting you, it will hide the messages so you don’t have to see them. Here’s how to filter out the messages on iPhones and Android phones .

If you’re an iPhone user, open the Settings app and tap Messages.

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Can This New Android Threat Brick Your Phone When You Answer A Call?

Microsoft recently published a security blog that warned about a sophisticated new ransomware variant. Not, as you might expect, ransomware that impacts users of the Windows operating system, though. Nope, instead, this was a warning for Android users.

The discovery of a context-aware machine learning code module in the MalLocker.B certainly deserves the sophisticated tag. However, that module has yet to be activated, and more of that in a moment. What has grabbed the attention of Android users who have read the various reports online, it would seem, is the fact that MalLocker.B can effectively brick phones only with a press of the home button when answering a call. But how true is that, and how worried should Android smartphone users actually be?

First things first, this is a fascinating and highly detailed bit of technical blogging from the Microsoft security folk. As such, that is to be welcomed, as is all information that helps us understand how threats, including ransomware, are evolving. Most users, however, will not have read that report for the very same reason: it’s a technical deep dive. That’s a shame, but not unsurprising. The job of journalists and reporters in the information security space is to explain such highly technical revelations in a way that can be absorbed by almost anyone regardless of their level of technical understanding.

On the whole, I think ‘we’ do a pretty decent job of that, and the MalLocker.B reporting is no exception. Apart from one thing: my inbox would suggest that many readers are coming away with the idea that their Android smartphones are in danger of being bricked simply because they have pressed the home button in response to an incoming call. That is