Tag: networks

14
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Nigeria’s Fastest Growing Internet Service Provider Expands Internet Access with Cambium Networks Wireless Technology

ROLLING MEADOWS, Ill., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Cambium Networks (NASDAQ: CMBM), a leading global provider of wireless networking solutions, today announced it is supplying Tizeti Network Limited, Nigeria’s leading public Wi-Fi operator, with an end-to-end wireless fabric solution. Cambium will help Tizeti expand its ISP operations in Africa’s most populous nation and meet customers’ increased demand for quality and high-speed connectivity, which has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Cambium equipment will also be deployed in Ghana, as Tizeti expands its Express Wi-Fi coverage.

With more than 1.5 million users, Tizeti is the fastest-growing internet service provider in Nigeria – a nation with almost 200 million people with relatively low broadband penetration. The company recently hit a major milestone in the growth of its ISP operations in Nigeria by delivering over 70,000 GB per day of traffic to its subscribers using Cambium wireless networking technology. The company is now expanding its network using Cambium’s cnPilot Wi-Fi access points with ePMP fixed wireless wide area distribution, and cnMaestro™ cloud-based management platform. By using solar power in the majority of its sites, Tizeti is able to rapidly deploy a highly resilient network, despite the challenging local conditions. As part of this effort, Tizeti has also begun deploying Cambium technology in Ghana to deliver gigabit broadband speeds over wireless.

“We are excited to have crossed this important network threshold in record time,” said Kendall Ananyi, Founder and CEO at Tizeti. “This would have been impossible without Cambium’s high-performance technology and disruptive economics. As we continue to invest in our core infrastructure to bring affordable, high-speed internet access to local communities around the country, end-to-end wireless solutions like Cambium’s comprising Wi-Fi access and fixed wireless broadband backhaul will be key to help us deliver the high performance and reliability our

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Working from home requires software-defined wide-area networks at home

Managed service provider Masergy Communications Inc. today announced two new offerings in its software-defined wide-area network portfolio that make it easier for people to work remotely.

The new services fall under the umbrella brand of “SD-WAN Work From Anywhere solutions” and extend Masergy’s current managed service to the millions of people now working out of the office. This enables businesses to give workers the same level of network and security services as they would have in the office.

Here’s the rundown on the solutions:

  • SD-WAN Secure Home includes a lightweight SD-WAN device from Fortinet. This acts as the gateway between the home network and the corporate one and provides application optimization and security capabilities. The use of an appliance simplifies deployment since the information technology department or Masergy can pre-provision it, ship it to the home worker and have the worker up and running almost instantly. The Fortinet appliance also provides access to the Masergy cloud for secure access service edge or SASE services such as network-based security services. This is available now and the price starts at $250 a month and then there are add-ons for security and unified communications bundles. But the price can also go down based on volume discounts.
  • SD-WAN On the Go is a software client that can be installed on mobile devices and laptops. The client includes a virtual private network and uses IPsec protocols to create a secure tunnel back to the company network. There is also integrated endpoint protection for threat protection. The On the Go product will be available, and although Masergy has not yet finalized pricing, it will be less than the Secure Home.

Both products are designed with zero-touch provisioning for fast setup. This is a key feature because asking users to download software, configure it and tune it

12
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Hospital networks restored after cyberattack

Valley Health System computer networks were restored Monday in the Las Vegas Valley, two weeks after after a cyberattack struck Universal Health Services medical facilities across the country.

“All six Valley Health System hospitals are online again, using the electronic medical records, lab and pharmacy applications,” said Valley Health System spokeswoman Gretchen Papez.

Universal Health Services, which operates Valley Heath System, said it shut down computer networks across the U.S. following a cyberattack on Sept. 27. UHS operates more than 400 hospitals and clinical care facilities across the U.S. and United Kingdom. Only U.S. facilities were affected, according to the company.

UHS said it resorted to using “established back-up processes including offline documentation methods.” One clinician in Washington, D.C., told The Associated Press that the loss of computer access meant that medical personnel could not easily see lab results, imaging scans, medication lists and other critical pieces of information that doctors rely on to make decisions.

Valley Health System facilities include Centennial Hills Hospital Medical Center, Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center, Henderson Hospital, Spring Valley Hospital Medical Center, Summerlin Hospital Medical Center and Valley Hospital Medical Center.

Other hospitals in the Las Vegas Valley said they had seen an influx of patients as a result of the Valley Health System’s networks being down.

In a statement Monday, UHS said that its U.S. hospitals “are resuming normal operations.” The majority of its behavioral health facilities also were back online.

UHS, a Fortune 500 company with 90,000 employees, said it had “no indication that any patient or employee data was accessed, copied or misused.”

The attack was a suspected ransomware attack, in which hackers infect networks with malicious code that scrambles data and then demand payment to restore services.

UHS did not confirm that it was a ransomware attack or say whether

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Staying connected when the world falls apart: How carriers keep networks going

To Mike Muniz, an area manager for AT&T’s network disaster recovery team, witnessing the aftermath of Hurricane Michael was like entering a war zone.

On Oct. 10, 2018, two days after forming over the Caribbean Sea, Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle. The most powerful hurricane to hit the US since Andrew in 1992, the Category 5 Michael killed 45 people, left 700,000 residents across Florida, Georgia and Alabama without power and caused $25 billion in damage.

Muniz arrived in Mexico Beach, Florida, a couple days later to help restore the area’s cell service, which the storm had wiped out.

“I look back, I think it was worse than Puerto Rico [after Hurricane Maria in 2017],” Muniz says. “I remember seeing people just wandering around.”

Following disasters that topple cellphone towers or knock entire networks offline, wireless providers need to be on top of their game when repairing them, especially as more Americans ditch landlines completely for their smartphones. Beyond providing a vital way for survivors to stay connected to loved ones and contact 911, reliable networks are also critical for receiving emergency alerts and staying informed of local conditions and recovery efforts. Likewise, emergency personnel need to plan and coordinate efforts to save lives and rescue people in danger.

AT&T teams work to restore service after Hurricane Michael. 

AT&T

While exact times will vary based on each situation, the company plans to have services restored within hours of being mobilized.

However long it takes, Muniz and his colleagues face exhausting work when managing disaster recovery, and they’re likely to be busy in the weeks ahead. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, which has broken records with 25 named storms as of early October, won’t officially close until Nov. 30. Hurricane Delta, currently in the Gulf of Mexico,

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Illusive Networks raises $24 million to thwart cyberattacks with honeypots

Illusive Networks, a cybersecurity startup specializing in defense and deception, today announced $24 million in venture funding. The company says the investment will be used to accelerate its next phase of growth, driven by a go-to-market strategy that focuses on sales and marketing expansion, with an emphasis on product enhancements for securing cloud workloads.

Damage related to cybercrime is anticipated to hit $6 trillion annually by 2021, according to Cybersecurity Ventures. Corresponding with this rise, Gartner reports that worldwide spending on cybersecurity is expected to reach $133.7 billion in 2022.

Illusive, which was founded in 2014 by Tel Aviv-based incubator Team8 and Ofer Israel, provides software that detects cyber attackers who penetrate a network while delivering logs to threat intelligence teams. Modular components work together or separately to preempt, detect, and respond to cyberattacks, allowing customers to see their networks as an attacker would and prioritize activity based on risk metrics and the potential business impact.

The Illusive platform lets security teams create credential and connection policies while automatically and continuously detecting and removing violations. It plants deceptions on endpoints — like internet of things devices, network switches, and PCs — that mimic the real data, credentials, and connections attackers need. Attacker choices alert security teams, capture forensics like screenshots and non-volatile system data, and reveal how far the attackers are from critical business assets.


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Illusive’s decoy module enables observation of attacker activity on honeypots that imitate the applications an attacker would target. As for the forensics timeline, it presents a roll-up of incident data in a streamlined, time-stamped, and sortable format. The attacker view management console, meanwhile, shows the proximity of attackers to an organization’s critical business systems.

An Illusive spokesperson demurred