Tag: Musk

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Elon Musk Denies Reports Of Bitcoin ATM At Nevada Gigafactory

KEY POINTS

  • Tesla CEO said reports of a Bitcoin ATM inside one of its facilities are inaccurate
  • LibertyX reportedly added Bitcoin selling feature to three ATMs at the facility
  • They can be accessed only by Tesla employees

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has denied recent reports that there is a Bitcoin ATM inside the car company’s Gigafactory in Nevada.

“I don’t think this is accurate,” Musk tweeted Monday, while replying to a tweet by news website Teslarati. The Teslarati tweet has since been deleted.

On Sunday, Will Reeves, the CEO of cryptocurrency payments and rewards app Fold, tweeted about spotting a LibertyX “bitcoin ATM at the Gigafactory,” along with a Google Maps image. LibertyX is a manufacturer of cryptocurrency ATMs in the United States. 

News outlet Finbold, on Sunday, reported that the LibertyX Bitcoin ATM, mentioned in the tweet, was in existence at the Gigafactory since August and it was only available to Tesla employees. The report said LibertyX did not install any new ATM kiosk but added Bitcoin selling feature to three ATMs that were already there at the facility.

In a statement to Finbold, the firm said it partnered with ATM manufacturers Genmega and Hyosung to offer “Bitcoin software preinstalled on traditional ATMs. Once operators activate the feature, consumers can start buying bitcoin with their debit card from ATMs nationwide.” 

LibertyX said there are already 5,000 ATMs with the feature activated in various locations across the nation and it is planning to roll out to more than 100,000 ATMs after this year.

Musk was a known advocate of cryptocurrency, although he claimed he only owns 0.25 BTC. Some recent data showed similarities between the benchmark cryptocurrency and Tesla stock.

In the past, people even speculated that Musk is the real identity of Satoshi Nakomoto, the anonymous creator

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Elon Musk has ‘seen no evidence of an advanced civilization visiting Earth’

starshipmuskhopsn5

Elon Musk tweeted this scenic view of the Starship SN5 prototype in mid-air in August. This is an identified flying object.


Elon Musk/SpaceX

The truth is out there, and Elon Musk is sure it has nothing to do with aliens visiting Earth. 

The SpaceX founder chimed in on the idea of UFO sightings through a couple of tweets on Sunday. “I have seen no evidence of an advanced civilization visiting Earth,” he tweeted. “Fuzzy pics that are worse than a 7/11 security cam frame grab don’t count!”

Musk was responding to a tweet from Fox television anchor Maria Bartiromo. She shared a clip from Sunday in which she asked President Donald Trump why earlier this year the Department of Defense set up a UFO group called the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force.

Bartiromo asked whether UFOs exist. Trump told the anchor he would “have to check on that” and would “take a good strong look at that.”

Musk followed up with a strong piece of anecdotal evidence for his UFO doubt, tweeting: “There are literally >1000% more cameras than 10 years ago, but still zero clear photos.” (That’s what I’ve been saying for years.)  

It’s no wonder people care what Musk has to say about aliens and UFOs. He’s one of the most prominent space proponents on the planet. There was a minor kerfuffle back in July when he cryptically tweeted: “Aliens built the pyramids obv.” This prompted a response from Egypt inviting him to learn more

11
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

SpaceX Starlink internet service gearing up for public beta soon, says Elon Musk

After a series of delays due to unfavourable weather conditions, the latest SpaceX Starlink mission launched last week on Tuesday, Oct. 6, at 7:29 a.m. PDT. This added 60 more satellites that are intended to beam down high-speed internet from space. This brings the total number of low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites from the privately-owned space firm to almost 800. It will not end just yet, as more are planned to go up in the future. The service is expected to go online for its beta testing phase soon.



a sign lit up at night: SpaceX Starlink satellites pass over Leiden


© Photo: Marco Langbroek / Marco Langbroek
SpaceX Starlink satellites pass over Leiden

Elon Musk said, “Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US and hopefully southern Canada.” This is just the initial phase, as SpaceX plans to increase coverage moving forward to eventually provide a constellation that can deliver reliable broadband internet services across the globe, reports ZDNet. He added: “Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval.”

Perhaps the most recent test of its capabilities was last month in the wake of the devastating wildfires that destroyed local communications infrastructure. Last month, the residents and emergency responders in the town of Malden in Washington were able to use Wi-Fi services provided by SpaceX Starlink satellites at the time. Musk noted that it was a special case scenario wherein it was able to help folks who needed internet connectivity given the situation.

Originally, the target speeds were set at approximately 100 megabits per second. Nevertheless, this is expected to improve as the satellite constellation grows later on. The official website states: “With performance that far surpasses that of traditional satellite internet, and a global network unbounded by ground infrastructure limitations, Starlink will deliver high-speed

09
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Space internet is ready for people to start using it, Elon Musk says

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has said his space internet project is ready for public use following the latest launch of Starlink satellites.





© Provided by The Independent


SpaceX delivered a further 60 satellites into low-Earth orbit this week, bringing the total number close to 800.

The private space firm hopes to eventually launch tens of thousands of Starlink satellites to create a constellation capable of beaming high-speed broadband down to 99 per cent of the inhabited world.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US and hopefully southern Canada,” Musk tweeted following the launch.

“Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval.”

The Starlink network has already been tested on a limited scale, providing internet to emergency responders in the US following recent wildfires.

The Washington Emergency Management division was able to set up a Starlink-powered WiFi hotspot for residents in Malden last month after 80 per cent of the town was destroyed by fire.

Musk said at the time that SpaceX was prioritising emergency services and locations with no internet connectivity at all.



a sign in front of a house: A satellite dish receives signal from the Starlink internet network in Malden, WashingtonWashington Emergency Management Division


© Provided by The Independent
A satellite dish receives signal from the Starlink internet network in Malden, WashingtonWashington Emergency Management Division

In April, the billionaire entrepreneur said that 800 satellites would be enough for “significant” global coverage, though speeds will be nowhere near the 100 megabits per second speed promised by SpaceX until the network grows.

“With performance that far surpasses that of traditional satellite internet, and a global network unbounded by ground infrastructure limitations, Starlink will deliver high-speed broadband internet to locations where access has been unreliable, expensive, or completely unavailable,” Starlink’s website states.

Areas that will fall within the public beta test include the Detroit metropolitan area

08
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Elon Musk says Starlink now has enough satellites in orbit to launch a public beta of its high-speed internet service

  • Elon Musk said on Tuesday that SpaceX’s internet satellite project, Starlink, had launched enough satellites for its public beta.
  • Once the most recently launched satellites are in position, the company will roll out a “fairly wide public beta” in the northern US and southern Canada, Musk tweeted.
  • Starlink’s goal is to put a constellation of satellites into orbit that can beam high-speed internet to remote parts of Earth.

Elon Musk’s goal of beaming high-speed internet to remote parts of Earth using orbiting satellites just got a step closer to reality.

SpaceX on Tuesday launched a batch of 60 Starlink satellites, bringing the total number in orbit to more than 700, according to Ars Technica. Musk, SpaceX’s CEO, said this was enough for a public beta.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US & hopefully southern Canada,” he tweeted after the launch.

This beta would include the Detroit metro area and Ann Arbor, Michigan, he said in response to a question.

“Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval,” he added.

Musk did not say exactly when the satellites were expected to reach their “target position,” and Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told Ars Technica that they might not be in place until February.

Musk said in April that a public beta for the service would be up and running in the fall. He also said in May 2019 that a commercially viable “initial” version of Starlink’s service for the US would be possible with 400 satellites, while 800 would be enough for “significant” global coverage.

So it’s possible, as Ars Technica’s report noted, that the public beta will get underway