Tag: Miners

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Ethereum Miners’ Revenue Triples Thanks To DeFi, Bitcoin’s Falls

KEY POINTS

  • Ethereum was more profitable to mine than Bitcoin in September 2020
  • Mining revenues soared because of the excitement over decentralized finance
  • As DeFi excitement wanes, observers are watching closely the launch of Ethereum 2.0

During the month of September, revenue from mining Ethereum has eclipsed that of Bitcoin’s thanks to the excitement surrounding decentralized finance (DeFi).

According to the data from analytics firm Glassnode, miners in the Ethereum network collected 450,089 ETH worth $168.7 million. This is a 39% increase from the previous month’s total of $113 million, Cointelegraph reported.

In contrast, miners in the Bitcoin network netted only $26 million in September, which is a decrease from the $39 million they earned the previous month. This effectively makes mining Ethereum more profitable than mining Bitcoin.

The increase in miner revenue came from the community’s excitement over decentralized finance (DeFi).

Several DeFi protocols and tokens made headlines last month. YFI, the governance token of Yearn.finance reached its all-time high of $43,678 on Sept. 12. That’s twice the all-time high of Bitcoin in 2017. Other noteworthy DeFi tokens that made headlines last month include UNI, the token of automated market maker UniSwap, and Sushi, the token of on-chain protocol SushiSwap.

Uniswap made headlines for dropping at least 400 UNI to anyone who used the Uniswap protocol prior to September 1. At one point, each UNI was worth $8, which meant anyone who received 400 UNI immediately had $3,200 in one day. 

DeFi without a doubt has renewed the demand for Ethereum. As more users want to get a piece of the DeFi tokens, the price of each transaction fee has ballooned. Cointelegraph noted that at one point, a standard transaction on Ethereum hit at least $15 on average. The publication said this is good in the short-term, as the

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Does Tesla’s Battery Day Mean Energy Storage Manufacturers Must Become Miners?

The world is electrifying at a rapid pace and the mining industry seems to be becoming a quiet but key player in the electrification process. Tesla’s
TSLA
recent ‘Battery Day’ announcements only highlight the incredible challenges facing the electricity storage market, and raise significant questions about how the market will evolve.

We know that demand for energy storage is surging to meet increasing demand for renewable energy and electrified transport. According to Maria Xylia at Sweco Sweden, only 3% of global capacity can be currently stored and energy demand itself is expected to increase over 50% to 2050. Storage is a fundamental necessity for the integration of renewables into a smoothly running and efficient energy system, and it needs to be cost-effective, high performance and safe.

As Dr. Young-hye Na, Manager, Materials Innovations for Next-Gen Batteries, IBM Research says, “Enabling better battery energy storage will be key to a successful energy transition to renewables and net-zero carbon emissions. While lithium-ion batteries have advanced significantly by cutting cost and improving energy density for the last decade, it is still too expensive to be widely adopted for EV and renewable applications, and heavy metals that are needed to make these batteries – ex. cobalt and nickel – have brought environmental concerns associated with their invasive and energy intensive mining.”

Tesla’s ‘Battery Day’ left experts somewhat puzzled. There had been high expectations of breakthrough announcements but the company laid out future plans for building its own batteries and its own supply chain, and for massively ramping up production to 2030. The company announced a new cell design which could cut battery costs in half but it’s yet ready. It can take up to ten years for a battery to move from the lab to commercial production. For an audience expecting significant change, it