Tag: mentions

01
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Religious group scrubs photos and mentions of SCOTUS nominee Amy Coney Barrett from website: report

Amy Coney Barrett
Amy Coney Barrett

Amy Coney Barrett University of Notre Dame

An obscure religious group tied to President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has scrubbed photos and mentions of her from its website ahead of her Senate confirmation hearings and interviews with lawmakers.

The New York Times reported last week that Barrett and her husband, who are the parents of seven children, are members of People of Praise, an obscure Christian sect which opposes abortion and teaches God has willed men to assume authority over their wives and family.

The Associated Press on Thursday reported that a search on the Internet Archive revealed that the group had removed content featuring Barrett and her family from its website in the summer of 2017, when she was on Trump’s short list for the seat later filled by Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The deletions included back issues of the group’s magazine, “Vine & Branches,” which had birth and adoption announcements for some of the Barrett family’s seven children, as well as several articles involving the federal judge or members of her family.

The group deleted more photos, articles and blog entries last week when Barrett again appeared as a likely nominee. A group spokesman confirmed to the AP that the organization had indeed deleted content.

“Recent changes to our website were made in consultation with members and non-members from around the country who raised concerns about their and their families’ privacy due to heightened media attention,” he said.

According to The Times, People of Praise describes itself as a “charismatic Christian community” whose members swear “a lifelong oath of loyalty, called a covenant, to one another, and are assigned and are accountable to a personal adviser, called a ‘head’ for men and a ‘handmaid’ for women.”

The “heads and handmaids

01
Oct
2020
Posted in website

People of Praise, a faith group, deletes mentions and photos of Barrett from its website

WASHINGTON — A religious organization tied to Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, sought to erase all mentions and photos of her from its website before she meets with lawmakers and faces questions at her Senate confirmation hearings.

Barrett, a federal appeals judge, has declined to publicly discuss her decades-long affiliation with People of Praise, a charismatic Christian group that opposes abortion and holds that men are divinely ordained as the “head” of the family and faith. Former members have said the group’s leaders teach that wives must submit to the will of their husbands. A spokesman for the organization has declined to say whether the judge and her husband, Jesse M. Barrett, are members.

But an analysis by The Associated Press shows that People of Praise erased numerous records from its website during the summer of 2017 that referred to Barrett and included photos of her and her family. At the time, Barrett was on Trump’s short list for the high court seat that eventually went to Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Last week, when Barrett again emerged as a front-runner for the court, more articles, blog posts and photos disappeared. After an AP reporter emailed the group’s spokesman Wednesday about members of Jesse Barrett’s family, his mother’s name was deleted from the primary contact for the South Bend, Indiana, branch. All issues of the organization’s magazine, “Vine and Branches,” were also removed.

Sean Connolly, People of Praise’s spokesman, confirmed in an email that information was being wiped from the group’s website.

“Recent changes to our website were made in consultation with members and nonmembers from around the country who raised concerns about their and their families’ privacy due to heightened media attention,” Connolly said.

The deletions come at a time when Barrett’s background is under intense scrutiny by

30
Sep
2020
Posted in website

Faith group deletes mentions of Barrett from its website


WASHINGTON (AP) — A religious organization tied to Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, sought to erase all mentions and photos of her from its website before she meets with lawmakers and faces questions at her Senate confirmation hearings.

Barrett, a federal appeals judge, has declined to publicly discuss her decades-long affiliation with People of Praise, a charismatic Christian group that opposes abortion and holds that men are divinely ordained as the “head” of the family and faith. Former members have said the group’s leaders teach that wives must submit to the will of their husbands. A spokesman for the organization has declined to say whether the judge and her husband, Jesse M. Barrett, are members.


But an analysis by The Associated Press shows that People of Praise erased numerous records from its

30
Sep
2020
Posted in website

Faith group deletes mentions of Barrett from its website | National News

A 2012 tribute written by Jesse Barrett about his recently deceased grandfather, Eugene Geissler, also disappeared. The story recounted how Jesse Barrett’s grandparents joined the religious community in 1976 and raised 16 children in the group.

At his wake, according to the tribute, a longtime member recounted how the couple was once audited by the Internal Revenue Service because the large number of dependents claimed on their return was considered suspicious. In response, Barrett wrote, his grandfather loaded all his children into a station wagon and drove them to the IRS examiner’s office.

Jesse Barrett, a former federal prosecutor who now works in private practice, did not respond to voicemail or email sent through his South Bend law firm.

In her speech accepting Trump’s nomination at the White House on Saturday, Amy Barrett put particular emphasis on the partnership of her own marriage, saying she expected from the start the she and her husband would run their household together.

“As it has turned out, Jesse does far more than his share of the work,” she said. “To my chagrin, I learned at dinner recently that my children consider him to be the better cook.”

Associated Press Writer Michelle R. Smith in Providence, Rhode Island, contributed to this report. ———

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