Tag: meetings

11
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

How to automatically record meetings on Zoom using your computer



a man standing in front of a computer: You can change your settings in Zoom to automatically record calls that you host. Zoom


© Zoom
You can change your settings in Zoom to automatically record calls that you host. Zoom

  • You can set Zoom to automatically record all the meetings that you host.
  • When changing your Zoom settings, you can also choose whether you want the recordings to be saved to your computer or the cloud.
  • For added transparency, you can turn on the “Recording consent” feature to let others in the call know when you’re recording.
  • This story is a part Business Insider’s Guide to Zoom.

You can easily turn on the “Automatic Record” feature in your Zoom settings online, and begin recording your Zoom calls. 

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Like other Zoom actions, such as the ability to mute and unmute participants, automatically recording the meeting only applies if you are the host.

It’s important to note that you are also unable to make any of these changes in the Zoom app for desktop or mobile, and can only be done in the browser. 

Once you start recording, you can enable the “Recording consent” function to let participants know that you are recording. 

Here’s how to do it. 

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

MacBook Pro (From $1,299.99 at Best Buy)

Lenovo IdeaPad (From $299.99 at Best Buy)

How to automatically record meetings on Zoom

1. Open Zoom in your browser on your Mac or PC.

2. Click on “My Account” in the top-right corner.

3. This will bring you to your profile and settings pages. Click the “Settings” tab under the “Personal” section in the left hand panel.

Video: Google can help you find COVID-19 hotspots: 2WTK (WFMY-TV Greensboro)

Google can help you find COVID-19 hotspots: 2WTK

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4. Click the “Recording” tab at the top. 



graphical user interface, application, Teams: Click "Recording" at the top. Marissa Perino/Business Insider


© Marissa Perino/Business Insider
Click “Recording” at the top. Marissa

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

WFH tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella: Regular breaks, short meetings, and other advice

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota)

Schedule super quick meetings just to check in with colleagues. Read more. And try to fit “moments of transition” into your daily schedule.

Those are some tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to help manage well-being with the new WFH lifestyle.

Nadella spoke this week at the Wall Street Journal’s CEO Council. He said he’s focused on three major considerations of how the nature is work is changing amid the pandemic: how collaboration happens, how learning happens inside companies, and how to ensure employees aren’t burning out.

The last point has become even more important over the past several months as workers conduct multiple meetings per day via video and don’t have the same interactions with colleagues at a physical office. Microsoft studies show that people are now working after hours and on weekends more frequently, and that remote work is leading to more stress and mental fatigue.

Nadella said people can get more tired because of the concentration required during video calls. That’s why Microsoft earlier this summer rolled out the new Microsoft Teams “Together” mode, a feature for video meetings that places participants against a shared virtual background, out of the traditional grid view, to help create the perception of sitting together.

Nadella also called out the new “virtual commute” feature for Teams, which uses automation tech to help users close out tasks and designate work for the following day, log their sentiment about the work day, and direct them into a guided meditation process. Microsoft said its research finds that the blurred lines between work and home are hurting remote workers’ feelings of well-being.

Whether it’s the bus ride to and from work, or even walking down a hallway for your next meeting, there are fewer “transition times”

06
Oct
2020
Posted in website

You can do meetings on Gather, a website that looks like a retro video game

On August 15, friends and family members from all over the world gathered in a church and reception hall to celebrate the wedding of Karen Dowling and Raghav Krishnapriyan.



text: Chris Neilson shows off the ConsiliumBots virtual office on Gather, which combines elements of retro video games with video chat.


© From Gather
Chris Neilson shows off the ConsiliumBots virtual office on Gather, which combines elements of retro video games with video chat.

Naturally, because of the pandemic, the wedding was a little different than usual. In addition to a small, in-person ceremony and reception, in Menlo Park, California, the bride, groom, and guests from as far away as India partied together online. They were represented as tiny, pixelated, two-dimensional characters on a website called Gather, which combines the nostalgia of retro video games with the face-to-face of video chat.

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Nothing can replace being together in person, Karen Krishnapriyan, née Dowling, conceded. Still, “These tools can help us make the most of it while we can’t be together,” she said.

Since the pandemic has squashed plans for face-to-face socializing, the Krishnapriyans are among the many people taking celebrations, classes, office work, and academic conferences to the internet to help them feel virtually connected while they’re physically far apart.

But while Zoom has stood out for months as a popular video chat platform, with millions of meetings conducted on it each day, it’s not right for every person or gathering. It lacks the spontaneity of walking up to someone at a party for a chat, for one, and it’s tricky to use with a big group of people, for another. And, for the most part, there isn’t a lot that differentiates the Zoom experience from that on Cisco’s Webex, Facebook’s Messenger Rooms, Google Meet and other video-chat apps.

For something a bit playful and flexible, a growing number of people, companies, and universities are turning to Gather, which rolled out