Tag: markets

12
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Global Geomechanics Software and Services Markets, 2018-2028 with 2019 as the Base Year

The “Geomechanics Software And Services Market By Component, By Solution, By Application – Growth, Future Prospects And Competitive Analysis, 2020 – 2028” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This research report presents the analysis of each segment from 2018 to 2028 considering 2019 as the base year for the research. Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) for each respective segment calculated for the forecast period from 2020 to 2028.

The Increasing Demand Among Oil & Gas Industry to Enhance the Performance is Driving the Growth of Geomechanics Software & Services Market

Globally, the geomechanics software & services market is expected to grow with a CAGR of 15.7% during the forecast period from 2020 to 2028. The market is driven by the growing demand among the oil & gas industry to enhance the performance of the drilling, reduce non productive time, and optimize wellbore contact. Due to the uncertain prices of the oil & gas commodities and increasing competition, the oil & gas companies are looking for more advance ways to reduce the cost of operation and gain operational efficiency. This is augmenting the demand of geomechanics software and services among the organizations to provide advance tools and service for optimizing the operational performance.

The geomechanics software and services enables organization to analyze the subsurface pressure, optimize refinement of fluids, and casing of fracture design. Furthermore, the solutions allow the geoscientists and engineers to enhance the operational safety, increase drilling efficiency and complete the design. These are the major factors that are augmenting the demand for geomechanics software and solutions among the organizations. However, the lack of skilled professionals in the oil & gas industry is acting as a major inhibitor for the growth of the market.

Services is Estimated to Grow Significantly During the Forecast Period

The geomechanics

11
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

How to Dominate SEO in Small Markets [CASE STUDY]

Although Google’s algorithm is based on universal guidelines, every market is different from one another.

By this, I mean that an SEO campaign may differ if you’re targeting the search market in the U.S., compared to targeting small international markets like the Danish one.

International SEO practitioners get to learn and try a variety of tactics – most of which are based on American studies that have plenty of prospects and a lot of data.

But this isn’t always the case.

When doing SEO in smaller markets, you’ll meet challenges that can slow down your campaign.

You’ll probably know this from testing different tactics.

This was the case for me and a client in Denmark, and it’s still an issue for many companies all over the world.

You need to use what you have to work with and develop a strategy from there to grow in small but competitive markets.

In this case study, I’ll share the tactics that actually worked in the Danish market – including strategies you can use in your own niche, no matter the size.

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The case is based on SEO efforts made by my company’s client, Telerepair.

I’ll share the overall strategy and highlight tactics that hopefully can inspire you to succeed in your own industry.

We’ll go through:

  • The market.
  • Results achieved.
  • Our overall approach.
  • Exact tactics (how we did it).
  • Tips to get your started (the key takeaways).

The Client’s Market

Our client, Telerepair, is a Danish franchise providing smartphone, computer, and tablet repair in Denmark.

The market consists of stores like them that offer similar services.

Our main goal was (and still is) to dominate the whole repair market locally.

Searching for [iPhone reparation] (Danish expression for “iPhone repair”), our client today owns the first two organic positions

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Legendary tech investor Bill Gurley says today’s markets remind him of the dot-com bubble



Bill Gurley wearing a suit and tie: Reuters


© Reuters
Reuters

  • Legendary tech investor Bill Gurley told CNBC on Friday that the stock market reminds him of the late ’90s dot-com bubble. 
  • “There is certainly what I would call a highly speculative nature to the markets today, a willingness to take on risks, a willingness to get excited about projects that may be five or 10 years in the future,” the Benchmark partner said. 
  • Other investors like Stanley Druckenmiller have drawn similar conclusions about today’s technology stocks. 

Legendary venture capitalist Bill Gurley told CNBC on Friday that the stock market reminds him of the late-1990s tech trading environment that led to the dot-com bubble.

“There is certainly what I would call a highly speculative nature to the markets today, a willingness to take on risks, a willingness to get excited about projects that may be five or 10 years in the future, that we haven’t seen since the ’99 time frame,” the Benchmark partner said. 

He added: “I really can’t speculate or know exactly what it was, or the confluence of events that led to that, but we are living in a more speculative technology market for sure.” 

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Other investors have echoed these concerns about frenzied traders pushing technology stocks into dangerously high territories. The top five tech stocks — Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, and Facebook — make up nearly a quarter of the S&P 500. 

Billionaire investor Stanley Druckenmiller said in September that the market was in

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Vista’s Robert Smith says there are more opportunities in private markets than public right now

Robert Smith, the billionaire chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Partners, said Wednesday that there’s a marked disparity in investment opportunities between the public and private markets.

Smith, who spoke with CNBC’s David Faber from the Delivering Alpha conference, said that his firm continues to look at high-growth investments in enterprise software versus more mature areas of technology that the public markets still emphasize.

“There’s actually a bit of dislocation of opportunity because 98% of enterprise software companies are private,” Smith said. 

“One of the keys is understanding what businesses are the right businesses to invest in as a private equity firm,” he added. “From our perspective, it’s really interesting: The public markets continue to focus on what we call hardware and consumer technology.”

Vista, now 20 years old, has carved out a niche for itself on Wall Street by investing in young software companies and restructuring them according to a strict list of standards to generate more profit and revenues.

Oftentimes Vista works with a fledgling software companies on its efficiency until it’s “mature,” and is ready to hit the public markets through an initial public offering.

And with advancing computing technology making its way around the world, Smith said the potential for even more compelling investments is accelerating.

Even beyond a comparison to the public markets, Smith said he’s seeing a deluge of enterprise software opportunities right now.

“In our sector, enterprise software, we continue to see companies with very strong revenue growth. If they’re run well, and with our work, they’re actually accelerating in this time period,” he said. “And the fact is that there is just a massive demand for digitization globally.”

“There has also been a distribution of computing power over the last 20 years, there’s actually a large number of software companies that are