Tag: mark

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Facebook Restricts Page Of Talk Show Host Mark Levin

Facebook has restricted the distribution of the page belonging to conservative talk show host Mark Levin for “repeated sharing of false news,” according to a notice from the largest social media giant Levin shared on his account on Parler.

Levin, a staunch defender of President Donald Trump and a fierce critic of the mainstream media, denies that he’s misled anyone and accused Facebook of “censorship” and “pushing a left-wing agenda.” 

“Every link I post is from a legitimate source,” Levin wrote on Parler, a social media site favored by conservatives. “But because so many people are seeing what I’m posting and we’re within weeks of the election, it’s clear that Facebook is trying to influence the election’s outcome.” 

It wasn’t clear which posts Facebook found objectionable. The official Facebook page for The Mark Levin Show has more than 1.5 million followers and more than 1.5 million likes. Levin has the fourth-largest audience in talk radio, according to Talker’s magazine. He also hosts Life, Liberty, and Levin on Fox
FOXA
is a frequent guest on the top-rated news channel.

“Mark Levin is an important thought leader with broad influence and wide reach,” said Parler CEO John Matze in a press release. “Millions of Americans look to him for news and analysis. Whether one agrees with him or not, it is important that Mr. Levin’s voice be heard. Those who disagree with him should debate him and refute his arguments, not try to silence him.”

An email seeking comment from Levin via his syndicator Westwood One wasn’t answered.

Facebook came under fire in 2016 to prevent Russian hackers and other bad actors from using the site to influence the outcome of the election.

01
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Trapped-ion quantum computer sets new mark for quantum volume

Extreme close-up photo of gold-colored computer component.
Enlarge / A look at one of the ion traps.

On Thursday, the startup IonQ announced that the next generation of its ion-trap quantum computer was ready for use. The new machine marks a major jump for the company, going from 11 qubits up to 32. While this still trails the offerings of companies that are using superconducting qubits, the high fidelity of the trapped ions makes them far less prone to errors and far easier to link into complex configurations. So, by at least one measure of performance, this is the most powerful quantum computer yet made.

Perhaps more significantly, IonQ’s CEO told Ars that it expects to be able to double the number of qubits every eight months for the next few years, meaning its hardware should consistently outperform classical computers within two years.

Trapping ions

IonQ isn’t the only company that’s working with trapped ions; Honeywell introduced a quantum computer based on the technology earlier this year. You can read that earlier coverage for more details, but we’ll summarize the reasoning behind this technology here.

Superconducting qubits—used by companies like Google, IBM, and Rigetti—are made using standard fabrication technologies and so are expected to benefit from further progress driven by the semiconductor industry. But as manufactured devices, they are neither perfect nor perfectly identical. As a result, their developers have had to find ways to work around a relatively high error rate and some qubit-to-qubit variability. While these issues have been improved, they’re very unlikely to ever go away. (There are other potential issues, such as inter-device interference and wiring complications, but we’ll set those aside for now.)

The fundamental unit of a trapped-ion qubit, by contrast, is an atom, and all atoms of a given isotope are functionally equivalent and, quite obviously, don’t suffer from manufacturing