Tag: macOS

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple Pulls Problematic Safari 14 and Security Updates for macOS Mojave [Updated]

Apple appears to have pulled the latest macOS Mojave Security Update (2020-005), which was released on September 24 alongside the macOS Catalina 10.15.7 update. Apple has also removed Safari 14 for macOS Mojave from download.


Both the Mojave Security Update and the Safari 14 update were causing numerous problems for those still running macOS Mojave, as outlined by Mr. Macintosh.

macOS Mojave users who installed the updates have been noticing memory issues, slow boot times and Finder stalling, numerous system.log entires, and crashes when attempting to use Migration assistant, among other problems. Complaints about the update started shortly after it was released, but Apple did not pull the updates until yesterday.

Those who had already downloaded the Mojave Security Update or installed Safari 14 should soon be getting a fix in the form of updated software that addresses the bugs that were introduced. Reverting to a Time Machine backup, reinstalling macOS Mojave, or installing ‌macOS Catalina‌ also seem to successfully fix the issues.

(Thanks, Jeff!)

Update: Apple has released a supplemental update for Mojave which presumably addresses the issues above. It should become available in your macOS software update.

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02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

iPhone 12’s Sneaky Surprises, MacOS Problems, New MacBook Warning

Taking a look back at another week of news and headlines from Cupertino, this week’s Apple Loop includes a surprising iPhone 12 Mini decision, a sneaky trick in the iPhone 12 box, a MacBook warning, updates and issues with macOS, a review of the Apple Watch 6, Facebook asking for more, and goodbye to the iPod Nano.

Apple Loop is here to remind you of a few of the very many discussions that have happened around Apple over the last seven days (and you can read my weekly digest of Android news here on Forbes).

The Shrinking Storage On The New iPhones

As we wait for Apple to formally announce the iPhone 12 family (including the new ‘iPhone Mini’ branding for the entry level model), details on the storage options have come to light, and while the flagship handsets see a nice jump in specs, those looking at the cheaper models are going to be disappointed at the cost-cutting on show. Forbes’ Gordon Kelly reports:

“Prolific Apple tipster John Prosser has confirmed that Apple will double the entry level storage capacities of the iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max to 128GB, which addresses much criticized 64GB starting point in iPhone 11 Pro models. But it’s not all good news.

“While iPhone 12 Pro models will get this (long awaited) storage bump, Prosser states that the all-new iPhone 12 mini (“Definitely the final marketing name”) and iPhone 12 will be stuck with 64GB of storage. They will also have the same 64/128/256GB upgrade options as the iPhone 11 line-up, missing out on the 512GB top tier available to the iPhone 12 Pro models.”

More here on Forbes.

The iPhone, The Box, And The EarPods

As well as speculation over the launch date of the iPhone 12 family, the question

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Why Apple Pulled macOS Mojave Security Update

KEY POINTS

  • Apple pulled a recent macOS Mojave security update after users complained about problems
  • The issues included memory problems, system sluggishness, slow boot and more
  • The macOS maker has re-released the new updates

Apple recently pulled the latest macOS Mojave Security Update, along with the Safari 14 download for Macs running on macOS Mojave, due to a slew of problems users have been experiencing. Thankfully, the company has released new updates for Mac users.

The macOS Mojave Security Update that Apple pulled, Mojave 2020-005, caused a variety of problems affecting the Mac user experience very badly.

The problems that users encountered included memory issues (such as no free memory), system slowness, slow boot, high fan speeds, problems with Finder, inability to create a new local user through Users & Groups, migration assistant crashes and more, per Mr. Macintosh.

Users who experienced these problems started reporting about them shortly after Apple released the update on Sept. 24. Interestingly, Safari 14, which was also pulled as it was affected by the problems, was released Sept. 16 – more than a week before the Mojave 2020-005 update.

Some users reported issues via different forums. The first report appeared just hours after Apple released the security update. One MacRumors forum user said:

“Is anyone getting really low free RAM after applying this update? Activity Monitor says I have 12GB of RAM used right after I launch it after logging in.”

Another MacRumors forum user mentioned more problems:

“Additionally, boot time is slower, logging in is slower and when doing so I’m met with a blank desktop which needs 7-8 seconds before icons finally appear. Everything feels sluggish, and applications also take more than twice as long to start up.”

Mojave 2020-005 was supposed to address security vulnerabilities in ImageIO, Mail, Model I/O and

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Macs Need T2 Security Chip to Play 4K HDR Netflix in macOS Big Sur

Apple’s upcoming macOS Big Sur operating system introduces HDR video support and allows Netflix users to watch content in 4K HDR for the first time. However, it turns out that only Macs with an Apple T2 Security chip are compatible with Ultra HD streaming.


Apple Terminal spotted a recently updated support document on Netflix’s Help Center that now includes hardware requirements for viewing 4K HDR content in Safari on macOS Big Sur.

According to the web page, viewing Ultra HD content can only be achieved on a “select 2018 or later Mac computer with an Apple T2 Security chip.” In addition to that, every monitor connected to the computer on which Ultra HD is streamed must be a 60Hz 4K capable display with a HDCP 2.2 connection.

It’s not clear why Macs need a T2 security chip to play back 4K HDR content, given that Windows machines obviously don’t, but it could be that this is Netflix’s way of ensuring that viewers aren’t trying to stream the high-definition content on older Macs, which could result in less-than-stellar performance.

The following Macs have the Apple T2 Security Chip, and can therefore stream Netflix in Ultra HD on macOS Big Sur:

macOS Big Sur is now up to its ninth public beta, and is likely to officially debut sometime this month.

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30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Mac with T2 Security Chip required to play 4K Netflix streams in macOS Big Sur

Those looking forward to streaming Netflix content in 4K HDR with the upcoming macOS Big Sur operating system will need a Mac with Apple’s T2 Security Chip, limiting the feature to recently released hardware.

Netflix recently updated a Help Center webpage with new guidance on viewing 4K HDR content in Safari on macOS Big Sur, noting both operating system and hardware requirements, reports Apple Terminal.

According to the support document only “[s]elect 2018 or later Mac computer[s] with an Apple T2 Security chip” are compatible with Ultra HD streaming. Further, all external monitors must feature 60Hz 4K capabilities and an HDCP 2.2 compliant connection.

Netflix fails to explain why Macs need a T2 chip to play back 4K HDR streams when comparable Windows machines do not. The chip does integrate a number of critical controllers like the system’s image signal processor and audio controller, which have been proven to lend a moderate boost to video encoding. It is possible that Netflix simply added the T2 requirement to ensure subscribers are using modern Macs with current graphics components.

Apple in a Support Document notes HDR video playback is limited to 2018 or later MacBook Pro models, 2018 or later MacBook Air models, the 2020 iMac, iMac Pro, 2018 Mac mini and Mac Pro, with 4K restricted to iMac and iMac Pro variants. T2 chip requirements are not mentioned.

Safari in Big Sur’s forthcoming compatibility with Netflix Ultra HD content was first spotted in June, early in the beta testing period. At the time, testers discovered the web browser enables 4K video streams encoded using the HEVC codec.

Apple is expected to debut macOS Big Sur in the coming weeks.

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