Tag: design

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

More Bad News For Apple As iPhone 13 Design Exposed

Apple’s iPhone 12 range has been revealed in detail and it brings several compromises which might put you off upgrading. But if you’re still on the fence, the first iPhone 13 information should convince you to save your money. 

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Just days before the iPhone 12 big reveal, respected industry insiders Jon Prosser, Ice Universe and Ross Young have all revealed Apple is set to make the design and display changes everyone wanted for the iPhone 12 series. 

Both Prosser and Ice Universe agree that Apple will finally reduce the size of the notch with iPhone 13. That said, they disagree on how this will be done. Ice Universe states that Apple will make it shallower (vertically) while Prosser understands that Apple will make it shorter (horizontally). The disagreement likely stems from Apple having multiple prototypes at this stage of development, something that has caused confusion before. Either way, it’s a win. 

Building on this, display specialist Ross Young reveals the iPhone 13 will reintroduce Touch ID (likely in-display and pandemic driven) alongside Face ID, come with larger camera sensors than the iPhone 12 models and adopt LTPO panels. LTPO is extremely power efficient and was expected to enable 120Hz ProMotion displays on the iPhone 12 line-up, but Samsung reserved all available stock for its Galaxy Note 20 Ultra this year and ProMotion was scrapped. The iPhone 13 will fix this. 

A further inevitable benefit will be 5G. While the iPhone 12 line-up all have 5G, speeds will be limited outside the US due to high pricing and restricted availability. Expect 5G modems to be cheaper,

11
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Ask These 4 Questions to Design a Great SaaS Website Copy

SaaS websites need to be special.

There’s always a temptation to focus heavily on what your software does: the technology used in your processes, the features of your offering, etc. Those things are great – and they can serve as validation of your offering’s value.

But it’s important to put your own preconceptions aside when you’re designing your SaaS website. If you don’t intentionally work to view your website from an objective perspective, your site will almost certainly have too much jargon, be too complicated to navigate, or even miss your target demographic entirely.

With that in mind, here are four questions to ask when designing and building a website for your SaaS company. These questions will give you the perspective you need in order to find out if your website design is optimal.

1. Does your SaaS website make a great first impression?

Here’s a fact that keeps web designer up at night: from the first click a user makes onto your site, you have between 50 milliseconds and 6 seconds to create a positive first impression. Clearly, that’s not a ton of time. How are you going to impress that visitor in such a short time span?

Here’s how:

And here are three examples I like:

bambooHR

Why I like it: it’s simple and it captures the core of the product. The image conveys the brand’s purpose and ethos, and the clear CTAs are focused on a free trial (which tends to be a good hook for SaaS products).

SpringSled

Why I like it: wow, this is simple. It gets the message across so clearly and quickly, and aligns really well with the theme of the product, which is (no surprise) simplicity.

WISTIA

Why I like it: the tagline is really simple, and the messaging is really consistent

09
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

Picture this.

You’ve spent a ton of time designing your website.

You’ve picked an attractive theme, added stunning images, and crafted compelling copy.

You’re sure visitors will love it (and you).

The only problem?

You aren’t getting any visitors.

In fact, your site is nowhere to be seen on Page 1 (or even #2 or #3) of Google.

What’s going on?

Well, here’s the thing.

Your web design might be the reason your site is ranking so low in search engines.

Ready to turn things around?

What follows are 10 of the most common web design mistakes that may be hurting your SEO efforts and your rankings – and how to avoid them.

1. Poor Website Navigation

Ever visit a website and have no clue what to do next?

You know, something like this.

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

I bet it had you running for the hills in panic.

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You don’t want your own visitors to do the same.

Right?

Instead, you want them to know exactly what to do at a glance.

Plus, you want Google’s web crawlers to understand your site.

To achieve this, make sure to prioritize internal linking between your important pages.

2. Slow Page Load Speed

People in the online world move at lightning speed.

They’re constantly zipping through social media, hammering away at emails, and zooming past a ton of generic headlines on the SERPs.

This means if they take the time to click on your site, and it takes forever to load, they’ll be gone before you know it.

After all, you didn’t invent the Keto diet or men’s wool socks.

There are other websites with the same information you have.

If you want your visitors to stay?

Make sure your pages load in three seconds or less.

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

The scary part is the

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Keysight Technologies and ROHM Semiconductor Enable Designers to Rapidly Modify SMPS Reference Design for SiC Power Devices

“Digital Twin” of ROHM Reference Design Enables “What if…” Design Space Exploration

Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), a leading technology company that helps enterprises, service providers and governments accelerate innovation to connect and secure the world, and ROHM Semiconductor, a leading semiconductor company, jointly announce today a PathWave Advanced Design System (ADS)-compatible workspace that enables designers to perform pre-compliance testing on virtual prototypes of switched-mode power supply (SMPS) designs. This new capability saves time and cost by catching errors early in the design before they become a big problem.

Demand for SMPS is driven by the need for greater efficiency, increased power density and lower cost. Fast, low-loss switches made from silicon carbide (SiC) and related materials will power future applications due to the high performance and efficiency they enable. However, unwanted side effects from high-speed switching include voltage spikes (“ringing”). In addition, it is more difficult to meet conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) specifications in higher speed designs. Pre-compliance analysis of a “virtual prototype” or “digital twin” is ideal for managing this challenge, but previously required expertise to build and use the necessary design information, called a “workspace.”

To address this, Keysight teamed with ROHM to create the “twin” of ROHM’s reference design (model P01SCT2080KE-EVK-001) available to mutual customers via Keysight’s web site at https://www.keysight.com/us/en/assets/3120-1476/application-notes/Virtual-Reference-Design.pdf.

Virtual prototypes are complementary to physical prototypes. Physical prototypes are the gold standard for compliance and measured characteristics, but have several drawbacks including: expensive and time consuming to design, build and measure; are vulnerable to catastrophic failure (the infamous “smoke test” that produces actual smoke); and it is hard to get a measurement probe onto interior nodes.

In contrast, virtual prototypes are easy to change and while they do flag device overstress as warning messages during simulation, they never emit real

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Russian Design for a Reusable Rocket Sure Looks Familiar

Conceptual images of Russia’s upcoming Amur reusable rocket.

Conceptual images of Russia’s upcoming Amur reusable rocket.
Image: Roscosmos

Roscosmos is moving ahead with plans to build Russia’s first reusable rocket. Glancing at the design, it appears the Russian space agency doesn’t feel the need to reinvent the wheel, given the vehicle’s uncanny resemblance to the SpaceX Falcon 9.

Roscosmos signed a contract with the Progress Rocket Space Centre to sketch out a preliminary design for the Amur-SPG reusable rocket, reports Russian news agency TASS. The inaugural launch is planned for 2026, when the methane-powered rocket will take off from the Vostochny spaceport in eastern Russia. Roscomos is hoping for individual launch costs no greater than $22 million, with the total cost of developing the system at around $880 million.

As Ars Technica space reporter Eric Berger rightly pointed out in a recent tweet, the new design seems uncomfortably recognizable.

“Russia has clearly decided that if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em with its new design for a reusable booster,” he wrote. “Alas, no flights until at least 2026 means it will be at least 15 years behind the Falcon 9. Russia is lucky SpaceX doesn’t innovate, hah.”

This design, even if preliminary, is clearly inspired by the first and only reusable rocket currently in existence, the SpaceX Falcon 9. In addition to borrowing SpaceX’s overarching design strategy, the reusable rocket will feature landing legs, a faring, and grid fins similar to those seen on the Falcon 9. The reusable second stage will land at predetermined landing pads in eastern Russia and be carried back to the cosmodrome, either by a heavy Mi26 transport helicopter or by rail, according to Roscosmos.

Alerted by Berger’s tweet, Elon Musk responded with words of support, but he also offered some unsolicited advice.

“It’s