Tag: data

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Domo Experts From Citrus Ad and DHL to Present at the Forrester Data Strategy & Insights Virtual Trade Show

Data and Technology Leaders will Share How They Are Leveraging Data and Domo to Solve Today’s Complex Business Challenges

Domo (Nasdaq: DOMO), provider of the Domo Business Cloud, today announced that two customers – Citrus Ad and DHL – will be hosting separate sessions at the Forrester Data Strategy & Insights Virtual Trade Show to share how they are leveraging data and Domo to solve today’s complex business challenges. The event is being held from October 13 – 15 and Domo is a premium sponsor.

“Domo empowers organizations of all sizes to unlock the value of their business data. Join our customer sessions led by data and technology leaders at Citrus Ad and DHL, as they share how Domo has empowered them to help their organizations be more agile, and create a data-driven culture through well-governed, self-service BI and analytics,” said John Mellor, chief strategy officer, Domo.

Details on the Domo customer-led sessions include:

Date/Time: Wednesday, October 14 @ 11:25am ET
Session Title: Building a Data Driven Culture to Help Power Retail Media Insights
Speaker: Adam Skinner, CTO, Citrus Ad

Date/Time: Thursday, October 15 @ 11:55am ET
Session Title: How DHL leverages data as a value differentiator
Speakers: Jasmine Miller, Data Engineer, DHL
Carlos Palacios, Sr. Manager, Data Operations and Pricing, DHL

Additionally, meet virtually with Domo experts during the Data & Insights Trade Show in the Interactive Marketplace. For more information on Domo’s presence at the Forrester Data Strategy & Insights Virtual Trade Show, visit here.

To learn more about how Domo has helped democratize data for over 1,800 industry leading, innovative and disruptive organizations, visit Domo’s customer page.

About Domo

Domo is the Business Cloud, empowering organizations of all sizes with BI leverage at cloud scale, in record time. With Domo, BI-critical processes that took weeks, months or

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

‘Apple Glass’ could use AR 3D mapping data sourced from an iPhone

The Apple Glass smartglasses or an Apple-produced VR or AR headset could take advantage of other hardware to determine where it is and movements three-dimensional space, by sharing data about the local environment.

One of the problems VR and AR headset producers have to contend with is the need to know where the head-mounted Is in an environment. This is especially important for augmented reality applications, as viewing systems that overlay a digital object over a real-world scene have to ensure that the positioning of the object in the user’s view is absolutely correct, to sell the illusion of its existence in the real world.

Headsets have multiple different ways to track their position, including accelerometers and cameras that point out into the environment to track nearby items.

However, in cases where there’s multiple people with head-mounted vision systems, or multiple iPhone users with ARKit apps as currently observable, each device typically handles their own co-ordinate-tracking system. Devices typically don’t share coordinates with each other during use, and generally work independently of each other.

In a patent granted by the US Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday titled “Method and device for synchronizing augmented reality coordinate systems,” Apple suggests a way to get all devices to metaphorically sing from the same songbook and to work with each other, by synchronizing data.

The idea initially starts with one electronic device handing over multiple items in a “feature set” to a second device, such as an iPhone or a base station transmitting data to an AR headset. This feature set can include a reference location in 3D space, coordinates for each of the devices, and in some versions, a map of the 3D space and points of interest within it that could be used to place virtual

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

How to mandate agility in software development, operations, and data science

Even when leaders proclaim in their townhalls that your organization needs to be more agile and nimble, they can’t mandate it. Your CIO and IT leaders may standardize on practices, metrics, and responsibilities that they describe as agile methodology standards, but they can’t dictate that everyone adopts agile cultures and mindsets.

You can select agile tools, automate more with devops practices, and enable citizen data science programs, but you can’t force adoption and demand employee happiness. IT operations may operate a hybrid multicloud architecture, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that costs are optimized or that infrastructure can scale up and down auto-magically.

So, if you were looking to quickly standardize your agile processes, or to miraculously address technical debt by shifting to agile architectures, or to instantly transform into an agile way of working, then I am sorry to disappoint you. Agility doesn’t come free, cheap, or easily. You can’t manage it on a Gantt chart with fixed timelines.

And while I believe that agility is largely a bottom-up transformation, that doesn’t mean that developers, engineers, testers, scrum masters, and other IT team members can drive agility independently. The team must work collaboratively, acknowledge tradeoffs, and define agile operating principles where there is consensus on the benefits.

So if agility can’t be mandated and requires everyone’s contributions, how do organizations become more agile? In the spirit of agile methodologies, data-driven practices, and adopting a devops culture, here are some ways everyone in the IT organization can drive agility collaboratively.

Make the case for agile methodologies 

Chapter 2 of my book, Driving Digital, is all about going from basic scrum practices to a more comprehensive agile planning process that includes assigning roles and responsibilities, planning multi-sprint backlogs, and standardizing estimating practices. When I work with teams trying to adopt agile

12
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Riversand Partners with Digital Data Consultancy to Offer Cloud-native Data Management Software in the UK

Riversand, a leading cloud-native SaaS Master Data Management (MDM) and Product Information Management (PIM) solution provider, announced today its partnership with Digital Data Consultancy Limited (DDC), a provider of digital consulting services in the UK operating across retail and consumer goods, banking and finance, healthcare and manufacturing.

The partnership enables Digital Data Consultancy to offer consulting and system integration services with Riversand’s transformational MDM technology platform. Riversand’s customers will benefit from an integrated consulting and implementation experience.

“Collaborating with Riversand offers forward-thinking companies an infinitely scalable cloud-native, muliti-domain platform for their product and master data needs,” said Saikat Ghosh, principal consultant at Digital Data Consultancy. “By combining Riversand’s ability to leverage data and provide better experiences with DDC’s implementation and operational depth, customers will get measurable value in their MDM and PIM investments.”

As companies transform their digital strategy to deliver a holistic customer experience, their foundation for success with a leading e-commerce solution includes having a robust system for master and product data.

“Digital Data Consultancy understands what customers can get from a multi-domain data strategy,” said Ben Rund, vice president of Business Development in Europe at Riversand. “With Riversand and DDC, customers can tap our joint expertise in delivering data strategy and better customer, partner, and supplier experiences – all to achieve their digital transformation goals.”

About Digital Data Consultancy

Digital Data is a one-stop consulting firm when it comes to strategic consulting of Data – be it Master Data, Big Data, Data Governance or Data Science. We help our clients to focus on their biggest technical asset – their Data. On a daily basis, we advise companies on how to actively manage their data, discover insights from the data and improve quality to make better decisions. We come with years of experience in implementing enterprise data transformation

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Data61 to take a stab at gleaning insight from NBN traffic data

The company responsible for the National Broadband Network (NBN) and the CSIRO announced on Tuesday that the data arm of the latter, Data61, will examine the former’s traffic data.

The initial project, which is to be a baseline for future measurements of digital maturity and resilience, will examine aggregated and de-identified NBN traffic data to look into how connectivity was used during the coronavirus pandemic.

“The project will assess how businesses and households across different regions, industries, and occupations moved their activities online as COVID-19 hit, and how this activity evolved as the pandemic, and associated restrictions, tracked over subsequent months,” the pair said.

“This could highlight the relative success of industries in adopting technology, adapting to an evolving work environment, and provide a perspective on productivity under COVID-19.”

Potential projects to follow were flagged as relating to energy, privacy and cybersecurity, the use of automation in agriculture, and digital health.

See also: Team Australia: CSIRO’s multimillion-dollar post-coronavirus plan

“The world is an increasingly connected place, and so much of our research in areas ranging from robotics to healthcare is now predicated on being able to share and compute data via broadband networks,” CSIRO chief Dr Larry Marshall said.

“This collaborative agreement facilitates the generation of new insights into how we are adopting digital technologies, to help solve meaningful issues and shape the future in many areas of society. Working with NBN Co, together we can deliver a unique national outcome.”

In last week’s federal Budget, the CSIRO received AU$459 million over four years to address the impacts of COVID-19, and to continue with its “essential scientific research”.

At the same time, the government allocated AU$2 billion for additional research and development tax incentives, once again saying the move was to mitigate the impacts of the pandemic.

“Research and development,