Tag: customers

03
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Secrets To Creating Software That Customers Love

This week Asana–which operates a platform for project management–pulled off its direct listing on the New York Stock Exchange. On the first day of trading, the shares shot up about 37%. 

The roots of Asana go back to 2008. The co-founders were Dustin Moskovitz (the the co-founder of Facebook) and Justin Rosenstein (a former employee at Facebook and Google).  They got the idea for their startup from their experiences at Facebook. When the company was growing at a breakneck speed, it was extremely challenging for teams to get things done. Often there was too much time spent on meetings and long emails.

But Moskovitz and Rosenstein thought that a cloud-based system could help solve the problem. This would allow for ease-of-use and wide access. The subscription model would also be affordable for customers.

No doubt, the vision has been spot on. As of now, Asana has 1.3 million paid users and recorded revenues of $142.6 million for fiscal 2020, up 86%. The market value is about $4 billion.

OK, how did Moskovitz and Rosenstein pull this off? What are some of the lessons? Well, Moskovitz and Rosenstein included a shareholder letter in the IPO prospectus and it provides an insightful playbook.

Here are some of the highlights:

Build Software That Customers Love: In the enterprise world,

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

6 steps for entrepreneurs to acquire more customers on social media

  • Susie Moore is life coach and advice columnist who’s been featured on Good Morning America, Oprah.com, and The Wall Street Journal. She helps entrepreneurs get hired by getting into the media. Sign up for her free workshop on how to get publicity for your business right here.
  • When used effectively, social media can be a powerful tool to access and sell to audiences instantly.
  • Moore shared six tips on leveraging and revamping your social media profiles to better connect with customers.
  • Start by reviewing all of your profiles. From there, you can tweak and update your profiles based on customer feedback and personal review. 
  • Don’t shy away from consistently engaging with your customers in meaningful ways — respond to comments, share screenshots of testimonials, and create a schedule you stick to.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As a business coach, it’s incredible to observe the opportunity that social media provides businesses of all sizes to access and sell to audiences on demand. 

My dermatologist Leslie Rohaidy fills up her practice debunking skincare myths on Instagram. And another friend, Tracy Campoli, a YouTube star, welcomes new members to her fitness community every week through her short, effective YouTube videos. I’ve also sold thousands of units of my books using Instagram and doing time-bound giveaways (whilst simultaneously spending my own money on hydrating under-eye patches and swimwear after observing influencers singing their praises on Instagram). This stuff works!

Social selling is real. Even better, it’s free to do. 

Here are some simple (but easily overlooked!) tips to move more of whatever you’re selling using your social platforms:

1. Refresh 

Log out of everything. Review all of your profiles from a prospect’s or customer’s point of view. 

Do they present you in the best and most concise way? Is it clear

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Headwinds for Google as Rivals, Customers Criticise Fitbit Concessions | Technology News

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Google’s bid to win EU approval for its $2.1 billion purchase of Fitbit faces headwinds as rivals and customers argue concessions to EU antitrust regulators do not go far enough, two people familiar with the matter said on Friday.

Alphabet’s Google last week offered to restrict the use of Fitbit data for Google ads and to monitor the process closely.

It also offered to make it easier for rival makers of wearables to connect to the Android platform by offering them access to Android software (API), and said third parties would continue to have access to Fitbit users’ data with their consent.

The European Commission is now seeking feedback from rivals and customers before deciding whether to accept the offer or demand more. Other sources have said the new concessions are likely to help Google secure EU clearance.

Some rivals and customers, however, plan to tell the EU competition enforcer to ask for more, the people said.

“The definition of wearable API is too narrow,” said one of the people, who said Google should broaden the scope to take into account new functionalities that come into the market in future.

Google’s 10-year data pledge also drew fire from its critics in advertising.

“Why would you limit the data separation remedy to 10 years? Bad idea. Google is making long bets. Ten years is tomorrow,” the second person said.

Respondents have until next week to provide feedback. The Commission is scheduled to decide on the deal by Dec. 23, although a ruling could come earlier.

(Reporting by Foo Yun Chee; Editing by Mark Potter)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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30
Sep
2020
Posted in software

Strigo raises $8 million to help software companies train their customers remotely

Strigo, a platform that helps companies deliver software training to their clients remotely, has raised $8 million in a series A round of funding led by Greycroft and Velvet Sea Ventures. The Israeli startup also said that it had tripled its customer base throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

The global pandemic has been a boon for online communication tools such as Zoom and Microsoft Teams, as companies have been forced to embrace remote working. Moreover, these platforms found a whole new lease of life in situations for which they were never even intended, such as dating and virtual social gatherings with friends. But a “one-size fits all” ethos is often not a good thing in the technology realm, as certain situations require dedicated tools for the job in hand.

Founded in 2017, Tel Aviv-based Strigo has built a platform that enables software companies to onboard and train customers in how to use the software. Traditionally, this is something that companies often did in person — they would send out specialists to give the training, which is a time-consuming, resource-intensive endeavor. And in a socially-distanced world, this approach is either impossible or fraught with friction. And that is what Strigo effectively tries to solve, with a unified platform that allows trainers to communicate, share content, and collaborate in real scenarios involving the software.

“It’s really about providing hands-on training in which customers learn by practicing within actual product environments,” Nevo Peretz, CEO and cofounder of Strigo, told VentureBeat.

Above: Strigo training cloud: One-on-one with attendee panel and dashboard

Strigo can also be used for in-person software training sessions at customers’ own premises, as the platform is designed to work without relying on local IT teams to facilitate sessions or book dedicated lab spaces. Employees can just turn up to a standard meeting

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Amazon is letting customers pay for groceries by scanning their palm at its Go convenience stores



a hand holding a cellphone: Amazon


© Provided by Business Insider
Amazon

  • Amazon is trialing its new Amazon One palm-scanning payment tech at two of its Seattle convenience stores, it announced on Tuesday. This allows you to pay by waving your hand.
  • The service connects your palm print to a credit card.
  • You can even sign up with both hands, Amazon said, because “you never know which palm will be free when you need it.”
  • Amazon is trialing the tech at two Amazon Go stores. It hopes to expand the tech to other stores, sports stadiums, and even offices.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon is letting customers pay with the palm of their hand at two of its Seattle convenience stores.

The e-commerce giant is trialling its new contactless Amazon One payment method, which connects your palm print to a credit card so that you can pay by waving your hand in front of a scanner, it announced Tuesday.

Your palm print also opens the electronic entry gates at the two Amazon Go stores, which usually require a code.

The tech would roll out to all 20-plus Go stores as the trial grows, Amazon told Recode. It was encouraging other retailers to sign up, it said.

Amazon One could also be used for people to identify themselves, Amazon said – such as when they enter offices and sports stadiums.

Customers can sign up by going to one of the two stores, entering their credit card details and mobile number into a device, and scanning their palm on a biometric reader. The process takes less than a minute, Amazon said, and customers can register both of their palms. The scan then connects to their Amazon One ID.



graphical user interface: The payment system uses biometric scanners. Amazon


© Amazon
The payment system uses biometric scanners. Amazon

In 2019, Amazon patented tech that would identify