Tag: CEOs

12
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Personal Growth Needs To Be Every Cloud Software CEO’s Top Priority, Says Bill.com’s Rene Lacerte.

On this episode Of Scaling Up, March Capital managing partner, Jamie Montgomery and Forbes futurist Rich Karlgaard talk to Bill.com’s founder and CEO, René Lacerte. Bill.com is a fast-growing cloud software company that sells automated payment services for small and medium sized businesses. When we interviewed Lacerte, BILL was worth $8 billion in market cap; today it is $9.12 billion. We talked about fast growth leadership, mentorship secrets, and how Lacerte’s father was a pianist for the late Gram Parsons, even though Lacerte’s father was missing four fingers.

Click below for video.

MORE FROM FORBESPersonal Growth Needs To Be Every CEO’s Top Priority, Says Bill.com’s Rene Lacerte

The following transcript has been edited for clarity and length.

Rich Karlgaard:  René, what was your original mission, how was it progressed, and the fundamental question – why is what you do important to your customers?

René Lacerte:  We think of ourselves as champions for small and medium-sized businesses to help them automate the financial processes that around paying and getting paid. If you think about payables and receivables, people do not expect this number to be true but it is. Ninety percent of businesses still rely on paper to manage their processes and make their payments. If paper is a primary form of making the payment, it ends up being fairly inefficient, error-prone, and lots of challenges. It ends up being a mess. For us, I wanted to focus on solving that mess. I wanted to take care of that pain point and really make a difference for a small and mid-sized businesses. There are six million employers in the U.S. – that is the target market. We have 98,000 businesses today that are on our platform. They use us to interact with two and a half million network members

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

CEOs of 3 tech giants to testify at Oct. 28 Senate hearing

This combination of 2018-2020 photos shows, from left, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. They are expected to testify in an Oct. 28, 2020 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

This combination of 2018-2020 photos shows, from left, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. They are expected to testify in an Oct. 28, 2020 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

AP

The CEOs of technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify for an Oct. 28 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted last week to authorize subpoenas for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey to force them to testify if they didn’t agree to do so voluntarily. Spokespeople for the companies said Monday that the CEOs will cooperate.

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said in a tweet in its policy channel.

The hearing will come less than a week before Election Day. It marks a new bipartisan initiative against Big Tech companies, which have been under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state attorneys general over issues of competition, consumer privacy and hate speech.

The executives’ testimony is needed “to reveal the extent of influence that their companies have over American speech during a critical time in our democratic process,” said Sen. Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican who heads the Commerce Committee.

Facebook, meanwhile, is expanding restrictions on political advertising, including new bans on messages claiming widespread voter fraud. The new prohibitions laid out in a blog post came days after President Donald Trump raised the prospect of mass fraud in the vote-by-mail process during a debate last week with Democratic rival Joe Biden.

With Trump leading the

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter, Facebook, and Google CEOs to testify on Oct. 28 to Congress

 Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, arrives for a hearing on May 6 in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, arrives for a hearing on May 6 in Washington, D.C.

Less than a week before the 2020 presidential election, three of the biggest names in tech—Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey—will testify before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation about a longstanding law that protects websites from liability for user-generated content.

The committee unanimously voted to subpoena the men on Thursday. They’re scheduled to testify on Oct. 28, according to committee aides who spoke with Politico on Friday on the condition of anonymity. While the subpoenas are ready to go out, they will not be formally issued because the CEOs have voluntarily agreed to appear before the committee, one aide told the outlet.

Their testimony will address Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a key legal shield that protects tech companies both large and small from liability for most of the content their users post online. Codified more than 20 years ago, Section 230 has become a flashpoint over the last few years for both political parties, with Republicans, including President Donald Trump, contending without evidence that major tech companies quietly censor conservative content and Democrats arguing that websites should lose their Section 230 protections entirely for hosting misleading political ads, among other offenses. According to Politico, the hearing will also touch on “data privacy and media consolidation.”

The hearing date, which falls just six days before November’s contentious presidential election, was reached after lengthy deliberations, a committee aide said. The tech CEOs originally pushed for a more far-off date, but after Republican committee members refused, they agreed to testify voluntarily if the subpoena authorization vote passed.

“On the eve of a momentous and

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter, Facebook to Send CEOs to Senate Hearing on Section 230

Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

(Bloomberg) — Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities.

A Senate panel voted to subpoena the heads of Twitter, Facebook and Alphabet Inc.’s Google for an Oct. 28 session focusing on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a provision that protects the companies from lawsuits over user-generated content. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg have agreed to attend voluntarily, their companies said.

The hearing “must be constructive & focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said Friday in a tweet confirming Dorsey’s attendance.

A Google spokeswoman didn’t immediately comment on whether Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai had agreed to attend the hearing. The Washington Post, citing an unidentified source, reported earlier that all three company CEOs would testify.


There’s bipartisan agreement in the Senate that Facebook, Twitter and Google are failing to properly manage content posted by billions of users to their platforms. But lawmakers disagree on the nature of the problem. While Democrats have called out the platforms for allowing misinformation that could affect the election, as well as hate speech and conspiracy theories, some Republicans have blasted the companies for censoring conservative voices and ideas– claims the platforms have rejected.

“Alleged ‘political bias’ remains an unsubstantiated allegation that we have refuted on many occasions to Congress,” Twitter said in a

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Facebook, Google, Twitter CEOs agree to testify before Nov. 3 election

Lawmakers have sought to convene the hearing to explore social-media sites’ content-management practices and the future of a federal law, known as Section 230, that spares tech giants from being held liable for the way they police their sites and services.

GOP lawmakers have ramped up their attacks in recent months as tech companies take a more aggressive stand against controversial tweets and posts from President Trump, including his widely debunked comments that seek to cast doubt over the 2020 election. Democrats, meanwhile, widely reject the claims of bias — instead, they fault Facebook, Google and Twitter for failing to crack down against harmful or abusive posts, photos and videos, including viral election disinformation.

A spokesman for Sen. Roger Wicker (Miss.), the Republican chairman of the Commerce Committee, did not respond to a request for comment. The hearing is set to occur virtually, with the tech executives testifying from the west coast.

Facebook confirmed Zuckerberg would attend, and Google did not comment. Twitter confirmed Dorsey’s attendance in a tweet late Friday that urged lawmakers to be “constructive & focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections.”

“Alleged ‘political bias’ remains an unsubstantiated allegation that we have refuted on many occasions to Congress,” the company added. “It has also been widely disproven by independent research. We do not enforce our policies on the basis of political ideology.”

Lawmakers’ hearing also comes as federal regulators continue to scrutinize Facebook and Google for their expansive corporate footprints. The Justice Department could file an antitrust lawsuit against Google as soon as next week, putting Pichai in the congressional hot seat over the government’s findings at the end of October.

Source Article