Tag: Belgian

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Belgian telcos leave Huawei out in the cold for 5G rollouts

Orange and Proximus have both chosen to use Nokia and Ericsson equipment for their respective 5G rollouts in Belgium.

The move will see both Orange and Proximus drop Huawei gear, which had previously been used as part of the telcos’ 4G networks.

The two telcos will use Nokia equipment to roll out 5G and progressively renew existing 2G/3G/4G mobile radio networks. Specifically, Nokia will build one radio access network (RAN) and one 5G network each for the telcos. 

Meanwhile, Ericsson will be responsible for building out the cores of the telcos’ 5G networks.

“The decision to collaborate with Ericsson is an important step in the execution of our network strategy. Proximus is committed to building the best gigabit network for Belgium, and the renewal of our mobile network equipment is a key element in this strategy for the coming years,” Proximus network business chief Geert Standaert said.

Telenet, the third major Belgian telco, is the last remaining telco that has yet to make a decision on which supplier it will use to build its 5G networks. 

Orange and Proximus’ decisions to not select Huawei gear continues the trend of the Chinese equipment provider being blocked out from 5G builds.

Last month, BT, the UK’s largest telco, picked Nokia to build more of its 5G networks across the country as part of plans to move away from its partnership with the Chinese telecommunications giant.

In Australia, Huawei has been banned from supplying 5G equipment for any 5G rollouts.

Meanwhile, all of Canada’s major telcos have gone elsewhere for their 5G rollouts and, although not officially banned, Huawei has not made any inroads in New Zealand after GCSB prevented Spark from using Huawei kit in November 2018.

Shortly after the announcement that Nokia received the nod in Belgium, the Swedish network giant

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Belgian privacy watchdog bid’s to police Facebook at EU court on October 5

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Facebook’s run-ins with EU privacy regulators may escalate as Europe’s top court next week weighs arguments from the Belgian data protection watchdog that it should have the power to go after the U.S. social media giant for breaches in Belgium.



a couple of people that are standing in the dark: FILE PHOTO: Silhouettes of mobile users are seen next to a screen projection of Facebook logo in this picture illustration


© Reuters/Dado Ruvic
FILE PHOTO: Silhouettes of mobile users are seen next to a screen projection of Facebook logo in this picture illustration

If the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) backs the Belgian authority (DPA), it could embolden national agencies in the 27-country bloc to take action against companies such as Alphabet’s Google, Twitter and Apple.

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Under landmark EU privacy rules known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and its one-stop-shop mechanism, the Irish privacy authority is the lead authority for Facebook as the company’s European head office is based in Ireland.

Google, Twitter and Apple also have their European headquarters in Ireland. GDPR however allows some leeway for other national privacy regulators to rule on violations limited to a specific country, which France and Germany have done.

The case before the CJEU on Oct. 5 came after a Belgian court sought guidance on Facebook’s challenge against the territorial competence of the Belgian regulator’s bid to stop the company from tracking users in Belgium through cookies stored in Facebook’s social plug-ins, regardless of whether they have an account or not.

Facebook said there are merits to EU’s rules in designating a lead supervisory authority for cross-border privacy issues.

“All businesses that operate across the EU who are subject to GDPR can benefit from this one-stop-shop mechanism; it allows companies of all sizes to understand their legal responsibilities and respond quickly to regulators,” Jack Gilbert, Facebook associate general counsel, said in an email.

The Belgian data authority said the issue was