Tag: Barrett

13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Amy Coney Barrett Memes Flood the Internet After She’s Asked to Hold Up Her Notepad

A particularly meme-able moment to come out of Tuesday’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing was when Senator John Cornyn asked Judge Amy Coney Barrett to share her notes with the room.



a person talking on a cell phone: Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett holds up an empty notepad before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. The moment was then taken and turned into various memes that were shared on the internet.


© Demetrius Freeman – Pool/Getty
Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett holds up an empty notepad before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. The moment was then taken and turned into various memes that were shared on the internet.

Cornyn, a Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told Barrett that senators had multiple notebooks, notes and books to reference during the hearing. Then, he asked if she could hold up the preparatory materials she was using to answer the committee’s questions, at which point she showed them a blank notepad save the Senate’s letterhead

“That’s impressive,” Cornyn said before continuing on with his other line of questioning.

As the internet often does, social media users capitalized on the moment to put their own spin on what transpired. Comedian Kathy Griffin, who’s butted heads with President Donald Trump on numerous occasions, posted a photo of Barrett with her notebook and said it was a photo of her “brain scan.”

For America, a right-wing digital activist organization, posted on Twitter a fake conversation between a Democratic senator and Barrett. They edited the pad of paper to read, “I know the cases you are bringing up better than you do,” as a response to a senator highlighting a court case during their questioning.

Another user going by the Twitter

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Amy Coney Barrett Confirmation Hearing Time, Schedule and Where to Watch

Today Amy Coney Barrett will attend a nomination hearing to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the U.S. It will be the first of a series of hearings over four days.



text: The witness table is set for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September.


© Erin Schaff – Pool /Getty Images
The witness table is set for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September.

According to the Committee on the Judiciary, Coney Barrett will speak at 9:00 a.m. local time in Washington, D.C. She can be watched live on the Judiciary’s website at this time.

The department’s website describes the Supreme Court as the United States’ highest court, with eight Associate Justices and one Chief Justice. These judges serve lifetime appointments on the Court in accordance with Article III of the U.S.’ Constitution.

According to the Committee on the Judiciary, in 211 years there have been just 17 Chief Justices and a total of 112 Justices that have served on the Supreme Court.

In the current presidency, President Donald Trump has nominated two associate judges to the Supreme Court. Neil M. Gorsuch was confirmed on April 7, 2017, replacing Judge Antonin Scalia, and Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed on October 6, 2018, to replace Judge Anthony Kennedy.

Amy Coney Barrett Notable Quotes On Catholic Faith And Politics, Abortion, Scalia And More

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Coney Barrett has been nominated to replace Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away on September 18, 2020.

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11
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Ex-members of religious group mixed on Barrett nomination

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s affiliation with the Christian community People of Praise is drawing scrutiny because of what former members and observers describe as its ultraconservative views on women. Her defenders say scrutinizing her beliefs and relationship to the mostly Catholic organization is akin to anti-religious bigotry.

But in interviews with a dozen former members of the organization and graduates of the schools it runs, most told The Associated Press that Barrett’s association with the group should be examined when the Senate takes up her nomination beginning Monday.

Some were proud and excited that one of their own could soon be on the high court, in a position to roll back abortion rights.

Others were deeply concerned about that threat, and also about the community’s teachings on gender, gay rights, and other social issues. They also raised flags about what they describe as the organization’s authoritarian structure.

Some wondered why Barrett has not disclosed or even acknowledged her connection to People of Praise and why the group appeared to try to hide her affiliation by from its website.

“I don’t think membership in the group is disqualifying,” said Rachel Coleman, who left the community in 2010. “I think that she needs to be open about it and transparent about it.”

The AP Barrett and her family have to the community, including that listed her as being one of the organization’s “handmaids,” now called a “woman leader.” She was a trustee of the group’s Trinity Schools, and , lived in a house .

People of Praise is not a church, but a faith community. It grew out of the Catholic charismatic movement rooted in Pentecostalism that began in the late 1960s. The movement emphasizes a personal relationship with Jesus and can include baptism in the Holy Spirit, speaking in

01
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Religious group scrubs photos and mentions of SCOTUS nominee Amy Coney Barrett from website: report

Amy Coney Barrett
Amy Coney Barrett

Amy Coney Barrett University of Notre Dame

An obscure religious group tied to President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has scrubbed photos and mentions of her from its website ahead of her Senate confirmation hearings and interviews with lawmakers.

The New York Times reported last week that Barrett and her husband, who are the parents of seven children, are members of People of Praise, an obscure Christian sect which opposes abortion and teaches God has willed men to assume authority over their wives and family.

The Associated Press on Thursday reported that a search on the Internet Archive revealed that the group had removed content featuring Barrett and her family from its website in the summer of 2017, when she was on Trump’s short list for the seat later filled by Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The deletions included back issues of the group’s magazine, “Vine & Branches,” which had birth and adoption announcements for some of the Barrett family’s seven children, as well as several articles involving the federal judge or members of her family.

The group deleted more photos, articles and blog entries last week when Barrett again appeared as a likely nominee. A group spokesman confirmed to the AP that the organization had indeed deleted content.

“Recent changes to our website were made in consultation with members and non-members from around the country who raised concerns about their and their families’ privacy due to heightened media attention,” he said.

According to The Times, People of Praise describes itself as a “charismatic Christian community” whose members swear “a lifelong oath of loyalty, called a covenant, to one another, and are assigned and are accountable to a personal adviser, called a ‘head’ for men and a ‘handmaid’ for women.”

The “heads and handmaids

01
Oct
2020
Posted in website

People of Praise, a faith group, deletes mentions and photos of Barrett from its website

WASHINGTON — A religious organization tied to Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, sought to erase all mentions and photos of her from its website before she meets with lawmakers and faces questions at her Senate confirmation hearings.

Barrett, a federal appeals judge, has declined to publicly discuss her decades-long affiliation with People of Praise, a charismatic Christian group that opposes abortion and holds that men are divinely ordained as the “head” of the family and faith. Former members have said the group’s leaders teach that wives must submit to the will of their husbands. A spokesman for the organization has declined to say whether the judge and her husband, Jesse M. Barrett, are members.

But an analysis by The Associated Press shows that People of Praise erased numerous records from its website during the summer of 2017 that referred to Barrett and included photos of her and her family. At the time, Barrett was on Trump’s short list for the high court seat that eventually went to Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Last week, when Barrett again emerged as a front-runner for the court, more articles, blog posts and photos disappeared. After an AP reporter emailed the group’s spokesman Wednesday about members of Jesse Barrett’s family, his mother’s name was deleted from the primary contact for the South Bend, Indiana, branch. All issues of the organization’s magazine, “Vine and Branches,” were also removed.

Sean Connolly, People of Praise’s spokesman, confirmed in an email that information was being wiped from the group’s website.

“Recent changes to our website were made in consultation with members and nonmembers from around the country who raised concerns about their and their families’ privacy due to heightened media attention,” Connolly said.

The deletions come at a time when Barrett’s background is under intense scrutiny by