Tag: airborne

13
Oct
2020
Posted in gadget

Can a gadget eliminate 99% of airborne viruses?

Can a gadget eliminate 99% of airborne viruses?
Image Source : FILE IMAGE

Can a gadget eliminate 99% of airborne viruses?

Venturing out amid this pandemic is like a task for the brave, almost all precautions seem less. However, as the country slowly gets back on its track and we step out of after being locked inside our houses for many months, one needs to be extra cautious as the virus has still not been eradicated. While wearing a mask and maintaining social distance are the basics, one can also ensure their air surrounding is virus free.

A device called Airtamer claims to work on advanced ionic technology and emits negative ions to purify the air that you may breathe in up to 99 percent. It can be worn around your neck to keep you safe when you step out.

The gadget is to be worn as close to the mouth as possible for it to perform its function efficiently. Due to its compact metallic design, it can be easily worn around the neck as a necklace and emits millions of negative ions into the air forcing dangerous viruses, pollutants, allergens, pet dander, or odors out of the sphere of your breathable air, it claims.

“It can prove integral in protecting individuals who have to commute, work in offices or even visit public places. We have always worked towards the safety of people, and this device will come in more than handy in this pandemic as the coronavirus is also an airborne virus,” said Sanket Aggarwal, Official Representative of Air Tamer in India.

A survey by Kitasato Research Center in Japan has proven that in just 20 minutes AirTamer fights 99 percent virus from the air. Another test that was carried out in Intertek Laboratory in Cortland, New York, said that AirTamer reduced smoke by 98.9 percent within

05
Oct
2020
Posted in website

In long-awaited update, CDC says airborne transmission plays a role in coronavirus spread

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged Monday that people can sometimes be infected with the coronavirus through airborne transmission, especially in enclosed spaces with inadequate ventilation.

The long-awaited update to the agency web page explaining how the virus spreads represents an official acknowledgment of growing evidence that under certain conditions, people farther than six feet apart can become infected by tiny droplets and particles that float in the air for minutes and hours, and that they play a role in the pandemic.

The update follows an embarrassing incident last month when the agency removed a draft that had not gone through proper review and was posted in error. The draft’s wording included a reference to aerosols – tiny droplets that can stay in the air, potentially traveling a significant distance. Officials said the draft was removed because they feared the language could be misinterpreted as suggesting that airborne transmission is the main way the virus spreads.

That is not the case. The main drivers of viral spread are larger respiratory droplets that are emitted when someone coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes, the CDC said.

“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than six feet away,” the updated web page states. “These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising. the updated web page states.”

“Under these circumstances,” the web page says, “scientists believe that the amount of infectious smaller droplet and particles produced by the people with COVID-19 became concentrated enough to spread the virus to other people. The people who were infected were in the same space during the same time or shortly after the person with COVID-19 had left.”

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05
Oct
2020
Posted in website

CDC updates website to include airborne transmission of COVID-19

Oct. 5 (UPI) — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a long-awaited update on the agency’s COVID-19 website Monday clarifying that the disease can sometimes be spread through airborne transmission and can travel more than 6 feet in unventilated spaces.

The agency said evidence shows the coronavirus can spread from particles that linger in the air even after an infected person has left, like the way tuberculosis, measles, and chicken pox are spread.

“The virus that causes COVID-19 appears to spread more efficiently than influenza but not as efficiently as measles, which is among the most contagious viruses known to affect people,” the website said. “People who are infected but do not show symptoms can also spread the virus to others.”

The update said that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than 6 feet away in poorly ventilated spaces. Some cases appear to have been transmitted when an infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising, the agency’s updated website said.

The update is a re-stating of an unapproved draft that appeared earlier on the federal health agency’s website and was then removed.

The agency said that so-called aerosol transmission was not the most common way to acquire the virus.

The easiest way to catch the highly contagious disease is to be in close contact (within 6 feet) of an infected person and inhale respiratory droplets when that person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes, the agency said.

Wearing a cloth covering over the nose and mouth significantly reduces the spread of both respiratory droplets and airborne transmission, the agency said.

The agency recommended avoiding crowded indoor spaces and making sure that indoor spaces were properly ventilated to bring outdoor air in as much as possible.