Tag: women

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Nasdaq Women in Technology: Niharika Sharma, Senior Software Engineer, Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab

Women in Tech: Niharika Sharma

Niharika Sharma is a Senior Software Engineer for Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab. She designs systems that gather, process and apply machine learning/natural language processing technologies on natural language data, generating valuable insights to support business decisions. Over the past years, she worked on Natural Language Generation (NLG) and Surveillance Automation for Nasdaq Advisory Services. We sat down with Niharika to learn more about how she got her start in computer science and how she approaches challenges in her career.

Can you describe your day-to-day as a senior software engineer at Nasdaq?

My day-to-day work involves collaborating with Data Scientists to solve problems, ideating business possibilities with product teams and working with Data/Software Engineers to transform ideas into solutions.

How did you become involved in the technology industry, and how has technology influenced your role?

My first exposure to Computer Science was a Logo programming class that I took as a junior in high school. After that, I took a couple of coding classes for fun.

When it came to choosing a college major, my high school Mathematics teacher suggested I consider a career in Software Engineering. At first, I thought, “Programming?! That’s too geeky!”. I liked coding, but I never wanted to be that nerd who sits in a cube staring at a computer all day. For college, I chose to study Chemistry at Delhi University, but a few months into the course, I realized technology was where I belonged, and I eventually pivoted to Engineering.

A decade later, I admit that it was the best decision I ever made. I found the concepts and problem solving so engaging that after obtaining my degree, I took a leap of faith and moved to the U.S. to pursue a Masters in Computer Science from Northeastern University. In the final semester, I

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Command Alkon’s Emily Branum Recognized As One of Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch

Winners Comprised of Birmingham Women Who Have Distinguished Themselves in Their Companies, Their Industries, and The Community

Emily Branum

Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal's Women to Watch for 2020.
Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020.
Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Oct. 12, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Command Alkon, provider of the leading supplier collaboration platform for construction’s heavy work, announces that Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, was chosen as one of Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020. This honorary list is comprised of record-breaking women who serve as key leaders in their companies or organizations. Additionally, this recognition highlights women who show potential to shape the future of Birmingham’s business world, and who are perfectly positioned to make a significant impact in the Birmingham business community.

“I am thrilled, but not surprised that Emily was selected for this honor,” said Phil Ramsey, CEO at Command Alkon. “Emily spearheads our leadership team when it comes to defining objectives to gain market share and maximize profitability, and how to execute plans to make those objectives achievable. Her leadership has been critical for our overall business growth, and we are so proud that one of our most valued leaders is receiving this well-deserved recognition.”

Emily is extremely active in the Birmingham community, serving as a member of The Rotary Club of Birmingham, as well as having chaired various fundraisers and served in leadership positions across numerous organizations, including: The Boards of Directors of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra; The Women’s Fund; The Junior League; Preschool Partners; Impact Alabama; and PARCA. Emily was recognized by the Birmingham

11
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Childcare Management Software Market | Increase in Women Workforce to Boost the Market Growth

The global childcare management software market size is poised to grow by USD 62.21 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of about 6% throughout the forecast period, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201009005371/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Childcare Management Software Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

There are a number of initiatives taken up by developed and developing countries to promote women’s engagement in the mainstream workforce. With a growing number of women shifting from the unorganized to the organized sector, there is an increase in women’s salaries in developing regions such as Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Because of the rise in women workforce, there is an increase in the number of parents registering for childcare services. Childcare centers are investing in childcare management software to track the progress of a child without human interference. The increasing women workforce will be one of the significant factors that will fuel the childcare management software market growth during the forecast period.

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Report Highlights:

  • The major childcare management software market growth came from the on-cloud deployment segment. The on-cloud deployment of childcare management software is a lucrative segment. This deployment method eliminates the need for customers to own hardware for running the application, thereby reducing their operational costs. The software can be accessed by any device such