Tag: video

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Engageli comes out of stealth with $14.5M and a new approach to teaching by video remotely

Zoom, Microsoft Teams and Google Meet have become standard tools for teachers who have had to run lessons remotely since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. But they’re not apps necessarily designed for classrooms, and that fact has opened a gap in the market for those looking to build something more fit to the purpose.

Today, a startup called Engageli is coming out of stealth with an app that it believes fills that need. A video conferencing tool designed from the ground up as a digital learning platform, with its own unique take on virtual classrooms, Engageli is aiming first at higher education, and it is launching with $14.5 million in seed funding from Benchmark and others.

If that sounds like a large seed round for a startup that is still only in pilot mode (you can contact the company by email to apply to join the pilot), it might be due in part to who is behind Engageli.

The startup is co-founded by Dan Avida, Serge Plotkin, Daphne Koller and Jamie Nacht Farrell. Avida is a general partner at Opus Capital who in the past co-founded (and sold, to NetApp) an enterprise startup called Decru with Plotkin, who himself is a Stanford emeritus professor. Koller is one of the co-founders of Coursera and also an adjunct professor at Stanford. And Farrell is a former executive from another pair of major online learning companies, Trilogy and 2U.

Avida and Koller, as it happens, are also married, and it was observing their kids in the last school year — when they were both in high school (the oldest is now in her first year at UC Berkeley) — that spurred them to start Engageli.

“The idea for this started in March when our two daughters found themselves in ‘Zoom School.’ One

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Trump Ad Uses Images, Video From Russia And Belarus [Watch]

KEY POINTS

  • A new Trump campaign ad features stock photos and videos from Russia and Belerus
  • The latest ad shows a shot of parents holding a baby, as well as an elderly woman
  • This is the fourth ad released by Trump-affiliated groups that features clips from Russia

A new pro-Trump campaign ad released last week in critical swing states uses images and videos from Russia and Belarus.

Last Thursday, America First Action SuperPAC released the “Pandemic Tax” ad in Florida, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. It is the fourth pro-Trump ad within three months that features actors in stock footage from Russia, Politico reported. 

The ad begins by accusing President Trump’s Democratic challenger Joe Biden of “supporting higher taxes on all of us” if he wins the November election. At the 14-second mark, the ad features a shot of new parents holding a baby in front of a window. 

The footage is owned by a user named Konstantin Mikidov. According to his Facebook page, he is located in Novosibirsk, Siberia. The footage is available for sale on Pond5 and Shuttershock. 

The ad displayed other foreign footage directly after Kmikidov’s. In the second clip, an older woman can be seen staring out a window while the phrase “HIGHER TAXES ON MIDDLE-CLASS RETIREMENT” appears on screen. 

The second clip was uploaded by “Zdyma4”. His profile on LinkedIn listed the name Viachaslau Rutkouski and said that he works as a photographer in Belarus, a close Russian ally. The footage is sold on iStockphoto for $60. 

Kelly Sadler, a spokesperson for America First Action, said they had used footage taken in China for previous ads, including one of Biden speaking at Sichuan University, The Hill reported. 

This is the fourth time a pro-Trump group has released an ad that features stock footage from Russia. Last month,

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

China’s smaller cities spend the most on video games nationally: Report

People visit the stand of Tencent’s mobile game ‘Glory of Kings’ during the 2020 China Digital Entertainment Expo & Conference (ChinaJoy) at Shanghai New International Expo Center on July 31, 2020 in Shanghai, China.

Zhou You | VCG via Getty Images

SINGAPORE — Video games are booming in China’s smaller cities, with citizens there accounting for more than half of revenue nationally, according to a recent report by Niko Partners.

“76% of gamers in China live in Tier 3-5 cities, accounting for 70% of game revenue,” Niko Partners said in a synopsis of its China Gamers Report.

Cities in China are classified by tiers based loosely on population and economic size. For example, places such as capital Beijing and Shenzhen are generally considered tier-one cities, while lower-tier cities are smaller.

The country is the world’s top game market and will generate an estimated $40.85 billion in revenue this year, according to Newzoo.

“What we think is happening with the smaller tiers is … there are more and more gamers adapting to uses of mobile devices,” Lisa Cosmas Hanson, founder and president of Niko Partners, told CNBC in a follow-up interview.

With “fewer things to do for entertainment” in smaller cities as compared with their cosmopolitan peers in Beijing and Shanghai, “gamers spend their time with little cost entertainment which can be social.”

This could also be attributable to improved mobile data and broadband infrastructure, Hanson added, with “lots of Android smartphones available at lower price points.”

In a country of 1.4 billion people, even China’s smallest “cities” can have a population of more than 1 million each.

For video game publishers looking at China, the analyst said: “If you really want to draw the attention of people throughout the country, Tier 4, Tier 5, these places can’t be ignored.”

Different

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

6 Reasons Why Video Is Hero In Digital Marketing

Using video in a marketing campaign is one of, if not, the most effective way of reaching millions of audiences today. Nearly three out of four businesses that use video for marketing benefit from better conversion rates while nearly two-thirds confirm it has led to direct sales. 

With over 230 million online viewers in the U.S. in 2020 alone, investing in video marketing is a no-brainer to drive growth to your business. In fact, over half of the viewers believe watching a video about a product made them more confident about their purchasing decisions. With online videos, you really have nothing to lose, since platforms such as YouTube will host them forever and they will continue to generate traffic for years to come. You can even supplement your main marketing video with videos providing further information about your product as well.

Here are six reasons video marketing is king and why your business needs to incorporate it now.

YouTube YouTube and other video platforms get hundreds of millions of visits every day Photo: Pixabay

1. Search engines love videos

Videos affect overall search engine ranking and most engines, including Google and Bing, suggest video links for almost every search query. So always include video embed/s on your posts or simply have a dedicated YouTube channel for your products or services. The chances of your website or videos ranking high on the search engine platform increase nearly 50 times if you have these at your disposal.

2. Videos offer a high return on your investment

The primary purpose of incorporating videos into your marketing strategy is to increase sales.  In fact, nearly 90% of businesses believe video marketing boosted conversation about brands and gave them a higher ROI. Over nine in 10 businesses surveyed also said that they will increase their spending

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

TikTok: Video app asks creators about biggest weaknesses

  • A TikTok survey shown to creators in the app indicates where the company thinks its biggest weaknesses might be.
  • In the survey issued late September, TikTok wanted to know if creators felt they were getting enough views, if they were paid enough, and if they had enough face time with local representatives.
  • It makes sense that TikTok wants to keep its creators happy as competition grows.
  • TikTok faces a squeeze for talent from rival services by YouTube, Instagram, and third parties like Triller.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

You can get a sense of the biggest issues an organization thinks it has by the questions it asks of its users.

Companies often conduct surveys of customers to identify issues — and TikTok is no different.

The social media platform quizzed a select group of its users in late September, and alongside the usual questions about their satisfaction with the app, TikTok also asked some specific questions on topics it seemingly believes are hot button issues among its userbase.

Within an extensive, four-page survey, TikTok asked users what challenges they had encountered when growing and reaching their audience on the app, giving respondents the opportunity to choose three options that were bugbears.

They included concerns that users’ videos are “rarely seen on the For You Page”, that “videos are rarely seen by my followers”, and that “my video views are not consistent.”

Funding is another issue prevalent within the creator community. Since creators can’t sponsor posts with ads, funding for creators mostly comes from TikTok’s own Creator Fund, established by TikTok earlier this year and which came under criticism for low payouts.

It’s an issue TikTok appears to be aware of, too.

The app asked users whether they agreed with a number of statements about their funding experience, including