Tag: leaves

08
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Fly Lands on Mike Pence’s Head & Becomes The Internet’s Breakout Star, Leaves Netizens in Splits



Mike Pence wearing a suit and tie


© Ritu Singh



Amid the heated Vice Presidential debate in Salt Lake City, Utah, a stray housefly that landed on US Vice President Mike Pence’s head of thick white hair became an unlikely star on the social media. Notably, the fly stayed there for two-three minutes, however, Pence seemed acutely unaware of the unwelcome visitor’s presence as he made no attempts to shoo it away. But, of course, it took no time for social media users to spot it and thereon, the VP debate As was expected, the fly brought laughs and spawned a whole new cluster of Twitter accounts. The fly has now topped the list of trending questions from the debate, and amusingly so.

Joining in the fun, Biden’s campaign also tweeted, “Pitch in $5 to help this campaign fly.” His campaign set up a website, flywillvote.com, to register voters and within the hour, it was selling a “Truth over Flies” fly swatter for $10.

“Everyone jealous because I got the best seat for the debate tonight” tweeted a MikePenceFly handle. “Please retweet if you agree that I defeated Mike Pence tonight,” came from TheFlyBeatHim. Here is how the fly triggered an avalanche of hilarious reactions on social media:

05
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

AT&T kills DSL, leaves tens of millions of homes without fiber Internet

A snail resting on a computer mouse, to illustrate slow Internet service.

Getty IMages | Synergee

AT&T has deployed fiber-to-the-home Internet to less than 30 percent of the households in its 21-state territory, according to a new report that says AT&T has targeted wealthy, non-rural areas in its fiber upgrades.

The report, co-written by an AT&T workers union and an advocacy group, is timely, being issued just a few days after AT&T confirmed it will stop connecting new customers to its aging DSL network. That does not mean customers in DSL areas will get fiber, because AT&T last year said it was mostly done expanding its fiber service. AT&T said at the time that it would only expand fiber incrementally, in areas where it makes financial sense for AT&T to do so. We’ll provide more detail on the DSL cutoff later in this article—in short, the fiber/copper hybrid known as AT&T Internet is still offered to new customers, but the slower product that AT&T sells under the DSL name is being discontinued except for existing customers.

Citing data that ISPs are required to submit to the Federal Communications Commission, the report issued today said that AT&T had built fiber-to-the-home to 28 percent of the households in its footprint as of June 30, 2019. The report was written by the Communications Workers of America (CWA), a union that represents AT&T employees; and the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA), an advocacy group that has been tracking AT&T’s broadband deployments for years. The groups say that AT&T has left rural areas and people with low incomes with old, inadequate broadband services.

There are 52.97 million households in AT&T’s home-Internet service area, and 14.93 million of them have fiber-to-the-home access, the CWA told Ars. The fiber percentages were particularly bad in some states, with rates of 14 to 16 percent in Michigan, Illinois, Mississippi, and Arkansas,