Tag: Labs

08
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Exer Labs raises $2 million and launches computer vision app for Peloton-style coached workouts

Exer Labs has raised $2 million in funding and it has unveiled its AI and computer vision Exer Studio app for the Mac that captures your movements for coaching advice and Peloton-style leaderboards for workouts.

The Denver-based fitness startup captures your movements with your laptop’s camera and evaluates your form. It can share your results with friends, fitness coaches, or others to see where you rank on the leaderboards, motivating you to work harder or faster.

CEO Zaw Thet said in an interview with VentureBeat that Exer relies on edge-based AI (meaning it uses your smartphone’s computing power) and computer vision to power its motion coaching platform. It offers real-time audio and visual feedback via a Mac (and its camera), on almost any type of human motion, without having a human in the loop. The mission is to help people move, train, and play better. Coaches can use the app for classes and see who needs help.

“Gyms have closed and are having trouble opening back up,” Thet said. “There are more than 300,000 professionals who aren’t able to train people in person. They have switched to streaming workouts, but it’s hard to keep people engaged on Zoom.”

The company has now raised $4.5 million to date. Investors in the latest round include GGV, Jerry Yang’s AME Cloud Ventures, Morado Ventures, Range VC, Service Provider Capital, Shatter Fund, MyFitnessPal cofounders Mike Lee and Albert Lee, and existing investors Signia Venture Partners and former Zynga executive David Ko.

Fitness in the pandemic

Exer can track movements for people doing workouts.

Above: Exer Studio can track movements for people doing workouts.

Image Credit: Exer

Thet said the Mac app uses the camera to capture your movements, so it knows how many repetitions you’ve done and whether your form is a match for the way the exercise is supposed to be

30
Sep
2020
Posted in software

Aurora Labs ramps ‘self-healing’ software with $23M from LG Technology Ventures, Porsche SE, Toyota Tsusho

The automotive market is grappling with increasingly complex software systems, and in turn greater risks of glitches that can cause costly and unsafe disruptions and damage an automaker’s credibility.

Just look at today’s new cars, trucks and SUVs compared to their counterparts a decade ago. New vehicles coming off assembly lines today contain tens of millions of lines of code, a statistic that continues to rise as automakers invest more in software.

This upward trend has created risks for automakers; it’s also opened up opportunity for burgeoning startups like Aurora Labs, which developed a platform that can spot problems with software in cars and fix it on the fly. The company is now preparing to ramp up operations, even beyond automotive, as software takes a central role in shared mobility, cities and homes.

Aurora Labs developed a platform designed to detect and predict problems and then fix any issues in real-time. The platform also enables automakers to update software in vehicles wirelessly — a feature often referred to as over-the-air software updates that was popularized by Tesla. The ability to conduct OTAs allows automakers to make changes quickly and without requiring owners to visit a dealership for service.

Earlier this month, the Tel Aviv-based startup raised $23 million in a Series B round jointly led by LG Group’s investment arm LG Technology Ventures and Marius Nacht, co-founder of Check Point Software Technologies. Porsche SE, majority owner of the VW group, Toyota Tsusho, a member of Toyota Group and the venture arm of global safety certification company UL also participated. Porsche SE invested $2.5 million and Toyota Tsusho put $1.5 million into Aurora Labs, according to the companies.

The funds will be used to double the size of Aurora Labs’ 30-person team to support going into series production with two of