Tag: Japan

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Big Money, Day Traders Both Love Japan Tech Darling Mercari

(Bloomberg) — Mercari Inc., the online flea-market operator that has become one of Japan’s most closely watched tech ventures, is closing in on new highs as the stock has drawn both big and small money.

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The company has already grown to command the largest weighting on Japan’s startup-focused Mothers index as individual investors buy in — of some 230 of the largest Japanese companies with market value of over $5 billion, Mercari has the third-highest percentage of individual shareholders. Then on Oct. 7, Los Angeles-based money manager Capital Group declared it had taken a 5% stake in Mercari.

That’s helping propel the stock to near the 6,000 yen mark it hit just once, on the day it listed to great fanfare in 2018. After a rapid decline, the stock has worked its way back up this year, fueled by its first quarterly operating profit. That’s been helped by the coronavirus pandemic, which has boosted usage of its online marketplace where users buy and sell items.



graphical user interface, chart, histogram: Mercari shares are nearly back to the post-IPO pop


© Bloomberg
Mercari shares are nearly back to the post-IPO pop

Mercari fell 0.2% in Tokyo on Tuesday. A gain of just 3.3% in the next trading session would see it match the 6,000 yen high.

Mercari is something of a rarity in Japan, which has few tech startups that have swelled to the size of the $8.6 billion company, according to Ikuo Mitsui, a fund manager at Aizawa Securities Co., who is still bullish on the firm after the share surge.

“In Japan there are very few companies like this, light on assets and not requiring large-scale capex,” he said. That’s why many are piling onto the stock, he added.

It’s even more unusual for being a Japanese startup that is starting to see success on its app outside of its home

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Sony Makes A Big PS5 Change In Japan, Swapping The Circle And X Buttons’ Functions

If you’ve ever played the Japanese version of a PlayStation game–or many games in the PS1’s library, including Metal Gear Solid–you were likely surprised to find that the menu buttons were reversed from normal. That’s because in Japan, the function of the X and Circle buttons are usually flipped, meaning that Circle confirms or selects, whereas X cancels. For the upcoming PS5, however, Sony is finally going to change the Japanese buttons to the Western standard, but not everyone’s happy about it.

According to Famitsu, this change will primarily affect the PS5’s user interface, but not the Japanese versions of PS5 games, which will likely lead to much confusion for many Japanese players who have “Circle for confirm” permanently etched in their brains. In the past, some PlayStation games have given players the option of changing their menu controls to their preferred standard, but it’s unclear if Japanese players will be able to change it in the PS5’s system settings.

This new information comes as several Japanese media sources have gotten hands-on time with the PS5. According to these sources, the PS5 is quite tall compared to existing game consoles, so players may have to move their setup around to get it to fit. The system is also surprisingly quiet compared to the original PS4, which–I can personally attest–whirrs like a jet engine when you’re playing demanding games like God of War or Ghost of Tsushima.

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

First PS5 hands-on reviews emerge from Japan, and more tech news today

Your tech news digest, by way of the DGiT Daily tech newsletter, for Monday, 5 October 2020.

1. Out of Japan: First PS5 hands-on reviews

PS5

Japanese reviewers are the first in the world to get their hands on Sony’s new PlayStation 5. A bunch of outlets showed off photos and video of the console in the flesh, and had the chance to play a few games, with some early vision of load times and gaming.

  • It’s a beast. The PS5 is the biggest console ever and early photos (still with plastic film on!) from 4Gamer, uploaded in very high-resolutions. Do check out what you see, even if most people will need Google Translate!
  • The images just lack the classic banana-for-scale type arrangement to really figure out sizing and dimensions, but hopefully no one should be surprised that it’s a big unit by the time first boxes are being delivered.

As noted by The Verge, there are a few hints at bits of metal hiding in the fins and vents, with this metal bit here supposedly a latch:

PS5 weird latch

  • The latch (or is it just a bolt/screw?) may be semi-accessible to open up the hardware box to add expandable storage with an SSD.
  • Sony promised this would be possible, but it hasn’t yet been explained exactly how it’ll work, including which type of connection is needed to connect your SSD of choice.
  • (4Gamer also explained that they hadn’t removed dust due to rushing through the photography and post-production process, but the non-matte finish may well collect dust anyway.)

Gaming:

  • Putting the console through its paces in a gaming session, 4Gamer said the console warmed up but remained cool: “As mentioned above, the exhaust was gentle, and I could hardly hear what seemed to be the rotating noise of the fan,” via translation.