Tag: IoT

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Semiconductor Foundry Market|Increasing Demand For IoT to Boost the Market Growth

Technavio has been monitoring the semiconductor foundry market and it is poised to grow by USD 26.47 bn during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 7% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200929005787/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Semiconductor Foundry Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Although the COVID-19 pandemic continues to transform the growth of various industries, the immediate impact of the outbreak is varied. While a few industries will register a drop in demand, numerous others will continue to remain unscathed and show promising growth opportunities. Technavio’s in-depth research has all your needs covered as our research reports include all foreseeable market scenarios, including pre- & post-COVID-19 analysis. Download a Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Impacts

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • What are the major trends in the market?
    Growing demand of 14-nm/16-nm FinFET technology is a major trend driving the growth of the market.

  • At what rate is the market projected to grow?
    The year-over-year growth for 2020 is estimated at 6.76% and the incremental growth of the market is anticipated to be $ 26.47 bn.

  • Who are the top players in the market?
    Fujitsu Ltd., GLOBALFOUNDRIES, NXP Semiconductors NV, ON Semiconductor Corp., Robert Bosch GmbH, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp., STMicroelectronics International NV, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Ltd., and United Microelectronics Corp., are some of the major market participants.

  • What is the key market driver?
    The increasing demand for IoT is one of the major factors driving the market.

  • How big is the North America market?
    The North America region will contribute 40% of the market share.

     

The market is fragmented,

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Swarm prices out its orbital IoT network’s hardware and services

Swarm’s new network of satellites is intended to provide low-bandwidth, low-power connectivity to “Internet of Things” devices all over the world, and the company just announced how much its technology will actually cost. A $119 board will be sold to be integrated with new products, so while your home security camera won’t get it, it might be invaluable for a beehive monitor deep in an orchard or gunshot detection platform in a protected wildlife reserve.

The Swarm board is about the size of a pack of gum, and provides a constant connection at the kind of data rate and power requirement that IoT devices need — which is to say, low. After all, things like barometric pressure monitors, seismic activity detectors and vehicles that operate far from cellular coverage just send and receive a handful of bytes now and then.

Connecting those to legacy geosynchronous satellite networks is possible, of course, but also expensive, bulky and power-hungry. Swarm aims to offer a similar service for a tenth of the price; the company’s basic data plan provides up to 750 packets per month, with each packet up to 200 bytes. Not a lot, but it’s more than enough for many applications.

Swarm's tiny satellites lined up before launch.
Swarm’s tiny satellites lined up before launch.

Image Credits: Swarm

It’s important to keep costs down and connectivity up in growing industries like precision agriculture and smart maritime and logistics work. Being able to check in hourly from anywhere in the world for five bucks a month is a no-brainer for many companies that otherwise might have to go blind or pay quite a bit more for a traditional satellite link.

It’s not just the Swarm chip that’s small — the satellites themselves are too. So much so that they attracted unwanted attention from the FCC, which worried that the