Tag: Intel

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Intel aims to streamline supply chain logistics with new DWS lidar software

Intel Corp. today introduced DWS, a new software product that promises streamline the supply chain operations of companies such as retailers by automating the labor-intensive chore of measuring packages’ dimensions and volume.

Intel, best known for its chips, also has a presence in a few other markets. Among others, the company sells a line of enterprise-grade depth cameras under the RealSense brand that can be used for tasks such as equipping industrial robotics with computer vision capabilities. The new DWS software announced today works with the RealSense L515 (pictured), a lidar depth camera introduced last December that Intel touts as the world’s smallest high-resolution lidar camera.

Measuring packages is an important part of running a modern supply chain. Delivery companies need to accurately log items’ size and volume to determine how best to allocate cargo capacity in their trucks. An e-commerce company, meanwhile, can use volume measurements of merchandise in its warehouses as a metric for evaluating inventory availability. These types of measurements also play a role in billing.

The challenge is that packages’ dimensions and volume typically have to be logged manually, which creates inefficiencies for large logistics firms processing millions of items per year. Enter Intel’s DWS software. A warehouse operator or delivery company can pair DWS with a number of RealSense L515 lidar cameras, deploy the cameras in its facilities and automate the measurement process.

Intel says DWS takes less than two seconds to glean a package’s dimensions and volume. It’s accurate to the millimeter, according to the chipmaker, and can measure objects ranging from small boxes measuring a few inches across to full-sized pallets. The RealSense L515 cameras DWS uses to capture this data produce images by gathering up to 23 million so-called depth points per second within their field view.

Besides speeding up measurements, Intel

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

PC Sales Continue Surging — And That’s Good News for Intel, AMD and Others

PC sales remain on the upswing thanks to purchases made to support remote workers and learners. And it looks as if there’s still a lot of pent-up demand going into the holiday season.

Research firm IDC estimates PC shipments rose 14.6% annually in Q3 to 81.3 million. That compares with 11.2% shipment growth in Q2, and just 2.7% growth in 2019.

Officially, Gartner estimates PC shipments rose just 3.6% to 71.4 million. However, when including Chromebook sales (counted in IDC’s official estimate), Gartner’s estimate for shipment growth rises to 9%.

Along with Chromebooks, Q3 was a strong quarter for gaming PCs and (in certain cases) notebooks with cellular modems, according to IDC. On the flip side, desktop demand was said to be weak in the U.S. and EMEA. Desktop PC sales depend heavily on purchases made to support corporate offices, many of which are of course empty right now.

Demand for gaming products has been strong pretty much across the board in recent months: In September, supplies of graphics cards based on Nvidia’s  (NVDA) – Get Report new GeForce RTX 3080 and 3090 gaming GPUs quickly sold out at major retailers, and Sony  (SNE) – Get Report and Microsoft  (MSFT) – Get Report both saw strong pre-orders for their next-gen consoles.

Between them, top-3 PC OEMs Lenovo, HP  (HPQ) – Get Report and Dell Technologies  (DELL) – Get Report accounted for 61.5% of Q3 shipments, per IDC. Lenovo and HP’s shipments were each estimated to be up more than 11%, while Dell’s shipments, which skew heavily towards corporate buyers, were estimated to have dropped slightly.

Apple  (AAPL) – Get Report, whose Mac revenue rose 22% annually during its June quarter, was estimated to have an 8.5% unit

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Intel touts ‘full-stack’ approach to quantum innovation

Intel has used its appearance at the IEEE International Conference on Quantum Computing and Engineering to discuss its “full-stack” approach to quantum innovation, which it has touted spans across hardware, software, and algorithm development.

According to the company, its body of work highlights important advances across those areas, which it said were critical for building scalable commercial-grade quantum systems that can run useful applications. 

Dr Anne Matsuura, director of quantum applications and architecture at Intel Labs, said quantum research within Intel Labs has made “solid advances in every layer of the quantum computing stack”, including with spin qubit hardware and cryo-CMOS technologies for qubit control, and software and algorithms research that she said would put researchers on the path to a scalable quantum architecture for useful commercial applications.

“Quantum computing is steadily transitioning from the physics lab into the domain of engineering as we prepare to focus on useful, nearer-term applications for this disruptive technology,” she added.

“Taking this systems-level approach to quantum is critical in order to achieve quantum practicality.”

As quantum is an entirely new compute paradigm, Intel said it requires a new stack of hardware, software, and algorithms in order to run future applications on a full-scale commercial quantum system.

 “Simulations can help provide an understanding of how to build all components of the full quantum stack, taking workload requirements into consideration before they get built in real quantum hardware,” Intel said. “Quantum research efforts across this stack are all necessary today so that as the hardware matures, useful applications are ready to run on near-term smaller qubit quantum machines.”

This approach, Intel said, is central to its strategy of taking a “systems-oriented, workload-driven” view of quantum computing, which is the foundation of its vision of quantum practicality.

The company presented its quantum research at IEEE, spanning

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Intel wins second phase of contract to help Pentagon develop chips

By Stephen Nellis

(Reuters) – Intel Corp on Friday said that it has won a second-phase contract in a project aimed at helping the U.S. military make more advanced semiconductors within the United States.

Under the project, Intel will help the military develop prototypes of chips using its semiconductor packaging technology at factories in Arizona and Oregon. The packaging technology allows pieces of chips called “chiplets” from different providers to be combined into one package, helping cram more features into a smaller finished product while lowering its power consumption.

Intel declined to disclose a dollar figure for its portion of the contract, which is being overseen by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division. Intel won part of the first phase of the contract in 2019.

Intel’s work with the Defense Department comes as U.S. officials focus on boosting domestic semiconductor manufacturing in response to the rise of China as a strategic competitor. About 75% of the world’s chipmaking capacity is in Asia, with many of the most advanced plants in Taiwan and Korea, within the reach of the Chinese and North Korean militaries.

“I think one of the areas where we can have the most impact on China broadly is re-shoring microelectronics,” Ellen Lord, the Pentagon’s chief weapons buyer, told the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee in a hearing on Thursday.

Intel is one of three companies in the world that can make highly advanced computer chips. The other two – Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd – have packaging technology similar to Intel’s.

But Intel has been working on the technology longer and can perform the work in the United States, which the other two cannot, said Dan Hutcheson, chief executive officer of VLSI Research.

“There’s no one else with the mix of technology

30
Sep
2020
Posted in computer

AI in Computer Vision Market 2020 Latest Advancements and Growth Analysis- Intel, Qualcomm, General Electric, Apple

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 30, 2020 (Market Insight Reports) —
The Global AI in Computer Vision Market Research Report 2020-2027 is a valuable source of insightful data for business strategists. It provides the industry overview with growth analysis and historical & futuristic cost, revenue, demand, and supply data (as applicable). The research analysts provide an elaborate description of the value chain and its distributor analysis. This Market study provides comprehensive data that enhances the understanding, scope, and application of this report.

Global AI in Computer Vision Market was valued at USD 3.32 Billion in 2018 and is projected to reach USD 68.11 Billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 45.64 % from 2019 to 2026.

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Top leading Companies in Global AI in Computer Vision Market are Wikitude, NVIDIA, Intel, Qualcomm, General Electric, Xilinx, Inc., Apple Inc., Alphabet, Microsoft Corporation, and Facebook and others.

The increasing adaption of artificial intelligence owing to the innovations in the technologies in the various automotive applications, business verticals, and modeling the environment such as medical image analysis are the major factors contributes to the growth of the market. In addition, the rising demand for edge computing in mobile devices and the effectiveness of artificial intelligence in the machine vision tend to propel the market growth. Furthermore, the adaption of the computer vision system in conventional and emerging applications is another factor driving the market. However, the insufficient expertise, lack of technical knowledge, and security concerns related to the cloud-based image processing are some factors expected to hamper the growth of the market.

Regional Analysis For AI in Computer Vision Market:

For a comprehensive understanding of market dynamics, the AI in Computer Vision