Tag: Instagram

09
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

12 Very Helpful Instagram Statistics Of 2020 Every Marketer Should Know

Instagram, which recently celebrated its 10th anniversary, has gone a long way from being a platform just focusing on photos, selfies and short videos. Since it was first introduced in cyberspace, it has become a tool that can change lives — whether for better or worse is debatable. For many businesses, content creators, influencers, advertisers and marketers, however, it has grown into a source of income as well as a channel for sales.

At the moment, your business’s intended audience is most likely using Instagram — and so does the competition. And it can be tricky to stay on top of the trends.

Whether your brand is new to Instagram or are having trouble promoting it online, it is good for marketers like you to know some very helpful Instagram statistics, giving you a good idea of what you should be doing on the platform.

instagram marketing Instagram marketing Photo: Mohamed Hassan/ Pixabay

1. Instagram is the 5th most downloaded free app

In 2019, Instagram was the fifth most downloaded app in the world, beating YouTube, Snapchat and Netflix. This is a good indication that the social networking app continues to attract users, which you can take advantage of for your brand.

2. 75.3% of businesses in the U.S. will be using Instagram this 2020

According to eMarketer, 75.3% of American businesses will use Instagram this year, suggesting that only Facebook will beat it out at 87.1%. 

digital-marketing-1725340_1920 Digital marketing is important to help a business grow its brand in the cyberspace. Photo: Photo from Pixabay (CC0)

3. Instagrammers keep tabs on brands

A 2018 survey found that 50% of Instagram users follow at least one business account. 

One way of getting potential clients in users is through an Instagram Business profile, which helps brands add additional contact information — an option that

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

U.S. House Antitrust Chairman Calls Unwinding Facebook’s Instagram Buy ‘The Right Answer’ | Technology News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Representative David Cicilline, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, said on Wednesday he would be “comfortable with unwinding” Facebook Inc’s acquisition of Instagram.

The antitrust subcommittee on Tuesday released a report on Big Tech’s abuses of market power but stopped short of naming specific companies or acquisitions that must be broken up.

Cicilline, a Democrat from Rhode Island, told Reuters in an interview that Facebook should not have been allowed to buy Instagram, a deal that the Federal Trade Commission approved in 2012.

“I would be comfortable with unwinding that. I think that’s the right answer,” he said.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment. It has said previously that Instagram was insignificant at the time it was purchased and that Facebook built it into the success it has become.

Any effort to unwind the deal would entail the government filing a lawsuit and asking a judge to order the divestiture.

The congressional report released on Tuesday said that Instagram was small at the time it was purchased, but that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg saw its potential and noted it was “building networks that are competitive with our own” and “could be very disruptive to us.”

According to the House panel’s report on Tuesday, the committee received an email from an unnamed former Instagram employee on Sunday that disputed Facebook’s contention that the two apps could not easily be separated.

“They can just roll back the changes they’ve been making over the past year and you’d have two different apps again,” the person wrote. “It’s turning something on and off.”

(Reporting by Nandita Bose and Diane Bartz in Washington; Editing by Chris Reese and Matthew Lewis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

TikTok passes Instagram as second-most popular social app for U.S. teens

  • TikTok has surpassed Instagram as teenagers’ second favorite social media app, according to a report published on Tuesday. 
  • The report found that 34% of teens list Snapchat as their favorite social app followed with 29% picking TikTok and 25% picking Instagram. 
  • Teen usage shows that Instagram remains in first place with 84% engagement, followed by Snapchat at 80% and TikTok at 69%, up from 62% in the spring.



Liskula Cohen et al. posing for a picture: TikTok General Manager Vanessa Pappas attends TikTok After Party at Bowlmor Lanes at Anaheim Garden Walk on July 11, 2019 in Anaheim, California.


© Provided by CNBC
TikTok General Manager Vanessa Pappas attends TikTok After Party at Bowlmor Lanes at Anaheim Garden Walk on July 11, 2019 in Anaheim, California.

TikTok has surpassed Instagram as U.S. teenagers’ second-favorite social media app, according to a report published Tuesday. 

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The short-video app is now favored among teens second only to Snap’s Snapchat, according to Piper Sandler. The report found that 34% of teens list Snapchat as their favorite social app followed with 29% picking TikTok. Trailing Snapchat and TikTok was Facebook’s Instagram, with only 25% of teens picking it as their favorite social app. TikTok placed No. 3 in the spring 2020 version of the Piper Sandler report. 

Usage was a different story, according to the report. In that regard, Instagram remains in first place with 84% engagement, followed by Snapchat at 80% and TikTok at 69%, up from 62% in the spring.

The report shows TikTok is continuing to gain market share among young U.S. users, which are a key demographic for social apps. These users are next a key demographic for advertisers, which are the main source of revenue for social apps. 

To circumvent the growing TikTok threat, Facebook in August released Reels, a copycat version of TikTok that lets Instagram users make short video clips of them lip syncing, dancing or doing skits. 

TikTok is owned by China’s ByteDance. Last month, President

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Instagram to hide negative comments on posts

Instagram said Tuesday that it will automatically hide negative comments in posts, one of several new steps the Facebook-owned social media platform is taking to reduce bullying and harassment.

Instagram has been testing the feature in recent days and said it will target comments that users have reported as inappropriate in the past. Users must now click the ‘View Hidden Comments’ button to unveil a negative comment that has been covered. 

Instagram has also tweaked its comment warning feature. After a user writes a potentially offensive comment, but before the comment is posted, a pop-up message will now appear that reads: “This may go against our guidelines.” The pop-up message notifies users that if they post a negative comment, it will likely be hidden and that Instagram may investigate whether to delete the user’s account. 

“Potential consequences”

“These new warnings let people take a moment to step back and reflect on their words and lay out the potential consequences should they proceed,” Instagram said in its announcement. “Since launching comment warning, we saw that reminding people of the consequences of bullying on Instagram and providing real-time feedback as they are writing the comment is the most effective way to shift behavior.”

Instagram didn’t offer specifics on what kind of language or comments would be hidden. The platform automatically deletes posts and comments that are pornographic, praise organized crime or threaten physical harm.  

Twitter’s policy is to remove posts that “wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against anyone.”

As Instagram hopes to minimize inappropriate comments, Facebook has

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Instagram boss: Foreign social media influence a risk in 2020 election

  • Instagram boss Adam Mosseri told Savannah Guthrie on “Today” that there are foreign adversaries trying to use social media to “their own end” ahead of the presidential election. 
  • “There are definitely foreign adversaries who are trying to use the platforms, or platforms like Instagram, to their own end,” Mosseri said. “We think of the election here in the US in 2020 as a huge test, not only for Instagram and Facebook, but for the industry at large.”
  • Mosseri oversaw Facebook’s News Feed during the 2016 election when Russia-linked agents spread disinformation on social media that reached millions of people, particularly on Facebook. 
  • It was a learning moment for Facebook, Mosseri said, noting that it took Facebook too long to “focus on the negative that can come from connecting so many people at scale.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Instagram boss Adam Mosseri said that foreign adversaries are attempting to use social media to “their own end” ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

Mosseri discussed Instagram’s role in the election during an interview Tuesday with “Today’s” Savannah Guthrie to mark the 10th anniversary of the popular platform. Guthrie questioned Mosseri on whether he thinks there is currently disinformation spreading on Instagram similar to the Russia-backed campaign on Facebook prior to the 2016 election. 

“There are definitely foreign adversaries who are trying to use the platforms, or platforms like Instagram, to their own end,” Mosseri told “Today.” “We think of the election here in the US in 2020 as a huge test, not only for Instagram and Facebook, but for the industry at large.”

Mosseri said Instagram is trying to focus on three primary areas ahead of the election: getting out the vote, preventing foreign interference like what happened in 2016, and planning for “complicated” scenarios, though he didn’t go