Tag: inclusion

06
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Computer Science Courses Pilot New Teaching Fellow Inclusion Training | News

Harvard is piloting a new teaching fellow training focused on diversity, inclusion, and belonging in two Computer Science courses this fall.

The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning; the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences’s Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging; and the Computer Science department created the training. It has debuted in Computer Science 121: “Introduction to Theoretical Computer Science” and Computer Science 61: “Systems Programming and Machine Organization.”

The training is composed of two parts, according to Nari G. Johnson ’21, a member of the Harvard Women in Computer Science Advocacy Council and organizer of the program. An asynchronous component on Canvas invites participants to read about diversity, inclusion, and belonging at SEAS. A second component include live discussions, role playing, and personal reflections.

CS 121 teaching fellows and instructors completed their live synchronous training last week in a session led by SEAS Assistant Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging Veronica D. Santana and Bok Center Assistant Director of Equity and Inclusion Noelle R. Lopez. The session saw full attendance from the course teaching staff, according to Santana.

Santana and Lopez said they enjoyed working through various scenarios with the CS 121 teaching staff in breakout rooms.

“My favorite one is where a TF or CA is with a student, and the student is just being very quiet. They’ve shown up to the office hour, it’s going on through Zoom,” Santana said. “The person who bravely volunteered to be the CA is just hearing silence from the student who has arrived at their office hour and having to take the lead and, very warmly but still directly and clearly, say, ‘Okay, so what part of the problem are you having an issue with?’”

Another scenario participants grappled with in the program’s asynchronous component involved an undergraduate course

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Building Strategies To Unlock Growth, Inclusion And Prosperity For Women In Technology

Co-Founder of Women in Cloud. I influence brands and entrepreneurs to unlock economic access through digital strategy and partnerships.

It’s been shown that diverse teams, including those with greater gender diversity, are on average more creative and innovative, and ultimately, they are associated with greater profitability. However, as McKinsey & Company notes, “despite the growing number of voices pushing for gender equality across the United States, and many tech companies stating that diversity is a priority, we are not yet seeing concrete gains in the tech industry.”

Women-led technology businesses face significant barriers when it comes to economic access. In 2018, female technology founders brought in just 2.2% of U.S. venture capital dollars.

While women in the technology sector were behind in the race for economic opportunities before the Covid-19 outbreak, the recent pandemic-related restrictions have had devastating economic and emotional impacts, pushing them even further to the back. According to a recent survey we conducted with Microsoft, women-led technology businesses are expected to lose between $1.5 million and $5 million in revenue and opportunities as a result of Covid-19.

Now more than ever, we need to increase economic access and leadership opportunities for women-led technology companies to support their recovery and growth. Here are four ways corporations, businesses and the private sector can improve economic access for women technology founders and their companies and support their recovery from — and growth beyond — the Covid-19 pandemic.

Unlocking Procurement Opportunities For Women Technology Founders

Many mistakenly assume that market competition and anti-discrimination legislation address any improper biases in contracting and procurement. However, only 1% of women technology entrepreneurs win contracts.

In order to improve women-led technology companies’ chances of securing high-level contracts, businesses and governments alike must unlock procurement vehicles to make them more accessible to women tech

02
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

UMMS diversity and inclusion programming to feature campus read, community conversations, diversity summit

© Ibram X. Kendi

UMass Medical School will hold a series of events this fall to help align and anchor diversity and inclusion programming, according to Chancellor Michael F. Collins and Terence R. Flotte, MD, executive deputy chancellor, provost and dean of the School of Medicine.

They said it remains one of their highest priorities to bring together members of the academic community for exploration and discussion of ideas that challenge, open minds, broaden perspectives, advance the institution’s mission, and ultimately create deeper connections among all who work and learn at UMMS.

The medical school community is invited to participate in a “Campus Read,” featuring the book, How to Be an Antiracist, by Ibram X. Kendi, PhD.

Dr. Kendi, an award-winning author and one of the nation’s leading scholars and historians of racism, recently joined Boston University as a professor and founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research.

UMMS has purchased a limited number of electronic copies of How to Be an Antiracist, which can be read on a Nook eReader (the eReader is available as a free download from the Barnes & Noble website). Email the Diversity and Inclusion Office at [email protected] for instructions on receiving a free copy.

Leading up to discussion about the book, all UMMS community members are invited to participate in campus-wide online conversations. Each of the following conversations will take place from noon – 1 p.m. and will also be recorded and shared on the UMMS Diversity in Action website. Upcoming emails from DIO Events will provide further information and registration details.

Community conversations include:

Oct. 21 – A Conversation on Gender Equity, led by Mary Ellen Lane, PhD, dean, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and interim vice provost for faculty affairs. Invited guest speaker: Gayle Capozzalo, executive director of

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Experian North America Expands Commitment to Culture of Inclusion With First Chief Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging Officer

Wil Lewis brings decades of diversity and inclusion expertise and leadership

Expanding on Experian North America’s commitment to a culture of diversity and inclusion, the company announced today Wil Lewis will join the organization as its first-ever Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Officer. In this role, Lewis will build upon Experian North America’s award winning programs to reflect the employees, clients and communities it serves, further the company’s commitment to diverse representation and continuously evolve the workplace culture where all employees are celebrated for bringing their whole selves to work. He most recently served as Senior Vice President, Global Diversity and Inclusion Executive for Bank of America.

“Embracing a truly inclusive culture, where everyone feels a real sense of belonging, is critical to building a diverse workforce and fostering innovation,” said Experian North America CEO Craig Boundy. “Our diversity and inclusion efforts have always focused on how we can contribute to a more equitable society within our Experian North America family, the communities we operate in and among the consumers we serve. We’re committed to being an agent for change and delighted Wil is coming on board to help lead that change with us.”

The creation of the new role highlights several critical components of Experian North America’s commitment to diversity and inclusion:

  • Building a company where inclusion fuels collaboration and innovation to develop products which enable financial inclusion for all

  • Ensuring that every employee feels emotionally connected to the company in an environment that is safe and supportive

  • Attracting, developing and retaining talent that represents the communities in which Experian North America operates

  • Institutionalize processes that will increase the number of diverse suppliers, disability accessibility tools and enhance the impact of external diversity partnerships

At Bank of America, Lewis led 11 employee resource groups with more than 350 chapters

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Glassdoor launches employee reviews for diversity and inclusion practices at companies

Glassdoor is now letting employees write diversity and inclusion reviews for companies in a way to make employers more transparent. Employees will be able to rate and review companies on how they treat employees based on race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other underrepresented groups.

In a poll, Mill Valley, California-based Glassdoor, which has ratings on more than a million companies, found that job seekers and employees trust the employees already working at a company when it comes to understanding the state of diversity and inclusion at a company. Glassdoor said that 76% of job seekers and employees today report that a diverse workforce is an important factor when evaluating companies and job offers. The company said these new features are part of its public commitment to leveraging its product and resources to help achieve equity in and out of the workplace.

The Glassdoor survey was conducted by The Harris Poll. It found that job seekers and employees report that disparities still exist within companies with respect to experiences with and perceptions of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. The company undertook the effort after this year’s racial unrest.

“In recent months, many of Glassdoor’s more than 50 million users have been telling us they want more insight into what the current state of diversity & inclusion is like at a company,” Scott Dobroski, spokesman for Glassdoor, wrote in an email. “Then, after the murder of George Floyd, we saw employee reviews talking about diversity, racial justice, and related topics rise by 63% on Glassdoor.”

Because of this, the company knew people wanted more data. “We believe we have a responsibility as a platform and as an employer to help drive equity in society, and we can help to create more equitable workplaces,” Dobroski said.

Job seekers and