Tag: hurt

09
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

Picture this.

You’ve spent a ton of time designing your website.

You’ve picked an attractive theme, added stunning images, and crafted compelling copy.

You’re sure visitors will love it (and you).

The only problem?

You aren’t getting any visitors.

In fact, your site is nowhere to be seen on Page 1 (or even #2 or #3) of Google.

What’s going on?

Well, here’s the thing.

Your web design might be the reason your site is ranking so low in search engines.

Ready to turn things around?

What follows are 10 of the most common web design mistakes that may be hurting your SEO efforts and your rankings – and how to avoid them.

1. Poor Website Navigation

Ever visit a website and have no clue what to do next?

You know, something like this.

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

I bet it had you running for the hills in panic.

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You don’t want your own visitors to do the same.

Right?

Instead, you want them to know exactly what to do at a glance.

Plus, you want Google’s web crawlers to understand your site.

To achieve this, make sure to prioritize internal linking between your important pages.

2. Slow Page Load Speed

People in the online world move at lightning speed.

They’re constantly zipping through social media, hammering away at emails, and zooming past a ton of generic headlines on the SERPs.

This means if they take the time to click on your site, and it takes forever to load, they’ll be gone before you know it.

After all, you didn’t invent the Keto diet or men’s wool socks.

There are other websites with the same information you have.

If you want your visitors to stay?

Make sure your pages load in three seconds or less.

How to Avoid 10 Common Web Design Mistakes That Hurt SEO

The scary part is the

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Uber engineer speaks out against company’s $186M campaign, says it’ll hurt drivers

As Uber has poured tens of millions of dollars into a California ballot measure to avoid classifying its drivers as employees, one engineer from inside the ride-hailing company spoke out against this campaign on Tuesday. In an op-ed published by TechCrunch, Kurt Nelson said Uber doesn’t have drivers’ interests in mind.

“Uber works because it’s cheap and it’s quick,” Nelson wrote. “But it’s become clear to me that this is only possible because countless drivers are spending their personal time sitting in their cars, waiting to pick up a ride, completely unpaid. Workers are subsidizing the product with their free labor.”


Nelson is one of only a handful of gig economy company employees to speak out against Proposition 22. It’s been historically rare to see tech workers criticize their employers’ positions. But that’s starting to change. Google employees organized walk-outs in 2018 over the company’s handling of sexual harassment allegations and Facebook employees staged a virtual protest in June after the company refused to take down inflammatory posts by President Donald Trump.


Nelson said he’s been a software engineer at Uber for two years, writing code for the company’s Android app. But when he was in college, he drove for the ride-hailing company Lyft. He said that experience gave him insight into what it’s like to be a driver and how difficult it can be when workers don’t have benefits.

Uber, Lyft and other gig economy companies currently classify their drivers as independent contractors, which means the workers pay for their own expenses, such as gas, car maintenance and insurance. Drivers also don’t have labor benefits like minimum wage, health insurance or paid sick leave. If they were to be classified as employees, many of those costs would then fall onto the companies.

In an effort to give gig workers

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Uber engineer speaks out on company’s $186M campaign, says it’ll hurt drivers

uber-7897

Uber and Lyft drivers have held several protests in California demanding to be classified as employees.


James Martin/CNET

As Uber has poured tens of millions of dollars into a California ballot measure to avoid classifying its drivers as employees, one engineer from inside the ride-hailing company spoke out against this campaign on Tuesday. In an op-ed in TechCrunch, Kurt Nelson said that Uber doesn’t have drivers’ interests in mind.

“Uber works because it’s cheap and it’s quick,” Nelson wrote. “But it’s become clear to me that this is only possible because countless drivers are spending their personal time sitting in their cars, waiting to pick up a ride, completely unpaid. Workers are subsidizing the product with their free labor.”

Nelson is one of only a handful of gig economy company employees to speak out against Proposition 22. It’s been historically rare to see tech workers criticize their employers’ positions. But that’s starting to change. Google employees organized walk-outs in 2018 over the company’s handling of sexual harassment allegations and Facebook employees staged a virtual protest in June after the company refused to take down inflammatory posts by President Donald Trump.

Nelson said he’s been a software engineer at Uber for two years writing code for the company’s Android app. But when he was in college, he drove for the ride-hailing company Lyft. He said that experience gave him insight into what it’s like to be a driver and how difficult it can be when workers don’t have benefits.

Uber, Lyft and other gig economy companies currently classify their drivers as independent contractors, which means the workers pay for their own expenses, such as gas, car maintenance and insurance. Drivers also don’t have labor benefits

06
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

3 students at online class, computer shop owner hurt as 10-wheeler loses brakes, slams into them

LIGAO CITY—Four persons, three of whom were students taking online classes, were injured after a ten-wheel truck rammed on Tuesday (Oct. 6) the computer shop where they were in along the Maharlika Highway in this city, a police report said.

The injured were identified as Nikko Oriel, 14 years old and a Grade 9 student; Ralf Marcos Quiped, 12 years old and a Grade 6 student; Justine Dela Cruz, 15, a junior high school student and Marion Manga, 27, computer shop owner, according to SSgt. Joel Llmas, Ligao City police investigator.

Llamas said an Isuzu flatbed truck from Guinobatan town was on the national road at the village of Tuburan past noon when it careened off its track and slammed into the computer shop where the students and shop owner were in.

The truck was being driven by Severo Sadia, of Naga City, and on board was the driver’s companion, Jero Abraham, 18.

Sadia told police that the truck lost its brakes and headed straight into the computer shop.

Three of the injured were taken to a hospital for minor injuries. Dela Cruz was pinned on the ground by the truck and brought to Bicol Regional Training and Teaching Hospital, the region’s biggest.

TSB


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