Tag: homes

05
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

AT&T kills DSL, leaves tens of millions of homes without fiber Internet

A snail resting on a computer mouse, to illustrate slow Internet service.

Getty IMages | Synergee

AT&T has deployed fiber-to-the-home Internet to less than 30 percent of the households in its 21-state territory, according to a new report that says AT&T has targeted wealthy, non-rural areas in its fiber upgrades.

The report, co-written by an AT&T workers union and an advocacy group, is timely, being issued just a few days after AT&T confirmed it will stop connecting new customers to its aging DSL network. That does not mean customers in DSL areas will get fiber, because AT&T last year said it was mostly done expanding its fiber service. AT&T said at the time that it would only expand fiber incrementally, in areas where it makes financial sense for AT&T to do so. We’ll provide more detail on the DSL cutoff later in this article—in short, the fiber/copper hybrid known as AT&T Internet is still offered to new customers, but the slower product that AT&T sells under the DSL name is being discontinued except for existing customers.

Citing data that ISPs are required to submit to the Federal Communications Commission, the report issued today said that AT&T had built fiber-to-the-home to 28 percent of the households in its footprint as of June 30, 2019. The report was written by the Communications Workers of America (CWA), a union that represents AT&T employees; and the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA), an advocacy group that has been tracking AT&T’s broadband deployments for years. The groups say that AT&T has left rural areas and people with low incomes with old, inadequate broadband services.

There are 52.97 million households in AT&T’s home-Internet service area, and 14.93 million of them have fiber-to-the-home access, the CWA told Ars. The fiber percentages were particularly bad in some states, with rates of 14 to 16 percent in Michigan, Illinois, Mississippi, and Arkansas,

05
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Internet Protocol Camera Market – Actionable Research on COVID-19|Growing Adoption of Smart Homes to Boost the Market Growth

The Daily Beast

Megachurch Pastor Contracts COVID-19 After Suing to Force School Reopenings

At San Antonio’s Cornerstone Church on Sunday morning, hundreds of maskless congregants sang and prayed, swaying together in the pews, babies and grandparents in close proximity.It might have been easy to forget there was a deadly pandemic blazing through the country.That is, until about 25 minutes into the sermon, when pastor Matt Hagee, on a stage bathed in blue light, announced that his father, the 80-year-old senior pastor and the church’s founder, John Hagee, had been diagnosed two days earlier with COVID-19. Hagee said during the Oct. 4 livestreamed service that his father “has been diligent throughout this entire COVID pandemic to monitor his health.”“It was one, discovered very early, and two, his medical team has him under watchful care, and three, he’s feeling well enough to be frustrated by anyone in a white coat with a stethoscope,” said Hagee. “He covets your prayers and asks for you to pray for him daily.”“As it is a reality in our lives, we also have a promise that we serve a God who is a healer,” Hagee added, addressing the massive crowd.Hagee’s diagnosis made waves locally, with many San Antonio residents commenting on social media that they were—at the very least—unsurprised by the news, considering how few masks have been seen at the church. It was not clear on Monday when the senior pastor was last spotted at the church himself, though he has given sermons in recent weeks, including one on Sept. 13 in which he urged congregants to vote with the Bible in mind.But Hagee is perhaps best known outside of Evangelical circles for his long history of outlandish statements, and, more recently, coronavirus shutdown skepticism.The current restrictions for San Antonio’s Bexar County require anyone over the

01
Oct
2020
Posted in gadget

Mothers are using the $460 Explore Air 2 Cricut label maker to tidy homes with military precision

Mothers are using a label maker to tidy their homes with military precision for spring, eliminating the hassle of rummaging in drawers forever.

The craze began when an Australian woman posted photos of her immaculately organised home in a Facebook group.

She told members she used the $460 ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut from arts and crafts store Spotlight to label storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne.

The machine – which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather – heralds the end to rooting and misplacing belongings because the contents of containers can be clearly displayed on the front.

Scroll down for video

A mother used the 'Explore Air 2' Cricut from Spotlight to label everything from storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne

A mother used the ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut from Spotlight to label everything from storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne

Photos of her labelling have drawn delighted responses from fellow mums

Their comments include 'wow this is nice', 'goals' and 'serious label envy'

Photos of her labelling (left and right) have drawn delighted responses from fellow mums, with comments including ‘wow this is nice’, ‘goals’ and ‘serious label envy’

Photos of her house-wide labelling have drawn delighted responses from fellow mums, with comments including ‘wow this is nice’, ‘goals’ and ‘serious label envy’.

‘Can I borrow you for a weekend to do my house?’ one woman asked.

A second called the organisation ‘next level’ while a third described it as ‘an awesome job’.

Others were inspired to invest in a label maker of their own.

The $460 'Explore Air 2' Cricut label maker, available from arts and crafts store Spotlight

The $460 ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut label maker, available from arts and crafts store Spotlight

The Cricut - which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather - heralds the end to rooting in drawers forever

The Cricut – which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather – heralds the end to rooting in drawers forever

‘Just ordered one of these tonight for the same purpose,’ said one woman.

Another tagged her friend

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Over 15,000 children’s homes surprised with free Wi-Fi amid COVID-19 pandemic

Over 15,000 student households in five school districts were gifted with free internet connectivity this morning, as many children struggle with online learning due to unreliable Wi-Fi amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“Good Morning America,” revealed the surprise today to students attending five public school districts located in Allegheny Valley, Pennsylvania, Jackson, Mississippi, Baltimore, Maryland, Santa Fe, New Mexico and South Bend, Indiana. They will now have five years of free internet connection in their homes, thanks to T-Mobile’s Project 10Million–a program that aims to eventually get free Wi-Fi to 10 million students’ households in the US.

“It means a lot to the community–to narrow the gap, for students to have the opportunity to have internet access at home. It’s amazing,” said Shawn Henderson, principal of Riley High School in South Bend. “We’re blessed, thank you.”

Of the 50 million children learning remotely, between 15 and 16 million lack adequate internet connectivity, according to the Center for Democracy and Technology. As a result, many students have turned to fast food restaurants or school parking lots to access online classes.

In Jackson, where school administrators are dealing with the challenges of online learning, Errick Greene, Superintendent of Jackson Public Schools told “Good Morning America” that about 25 percent of students are not connected through the internet.

Learn more about ways to help teachers on Donors Choose.

The digital divide has been present even before the pandemic hit, with many households without internet access due to racial, economic and geographic inequalities.

“There’s a lot of barriers, infrastructure barriers, cost barriers and just barriers in general to getting people connected,” said Brett Slezak, Supervisor of Technology at Allegheny Valley School in Pennsylvania.

In Baltimore, 20,000 families were without access to broadband, which is equivalent to 40,000 students.

And in indigenous communities in New