Tag: hold

13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Amy Coney Barrett Memes Flood the Internet After She’s Asked to Hold Up Her Notepad

A particularly meme-able moment to come out of Tuesday’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing was when Senator John Cornyn asked Judge Amy Coney Barrett to share her notes with the room.



a person talking on a cell phone: Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett holds up an empty notepad before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. The moment was then taken and turned into various memes that were shared on the internet.


© Demetrius Freeman – Pool/Getty
Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett holds up an empty notepad before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. The moment was then taken and turned into various memes that were shared on the internet.

Cornyn, a Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told Barrett that senators had multiple notebooks, notes and books to reference during the hearing. Then, he asked if she could hold up the preparatory materials she was using to answer the committee’s questions, at which point she showed them a blank notepad save the Senate’s letterhead

“That’s impressive,” Cornyn said before continuing on with his other line of questioning.

As the internet often does, social media users capitalized on the moment to put their own spin on what transpired. Comedian Kathy Griffin, who’s butted heads with President Donald Trump on numerous occasions, posted a photo of Barrett with her notebook and said it was a photo of her “brain scan.”

For America, a right-wing digital activist organization, posted on Twitter a fake conversation between a Democratic senator and Barrett. They edited the pad of paper to read, “I know the cases you are bringing up better than you do,” as a response to a senator highlighting a court case during their questioning.

Another user going by the Twitter

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

CRA Website Error Puts CRB Applications on Hold

It seems like the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) Thanksgiving surprise was not that good. Canadians are flocking on to Twitter and other social media sites to discuss the error message on the CRA website. Today, the CRA opened the application window for the Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB). Millions of Canadians logged in only to be disappointed with a message.

The message read, “You cannot apply for the Canada Recovery Benefit as you have applied for all eligible periods. The next periods become available every second Monday.”

And today being Thanksgiving, the CRA contact centre is closed. So, I guess you will have to wait until Tuesday to apply for the CRB. 

The CRA website error on CRB application

The CRA had less than a month to transition millions of Canadians from the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) to CRB. Also, it had to implement new sickness and caregiving benefits. To pile up the work, the CRA was waiting for the legislation on the new benefits to be passed till the end of September. This left the CRA with just two weeks to implement three benefits. To add to the trouble, the CRA website had two incidents of cyber attacks in August, which encouraged the agency to add a layer of security. 

All the above hurdles made the transition from CERB to CRB difficult. This is not the first time there has been an error in benefit payments. When the government launched the CERB in April, both the CRA and Service Canada were processing the claims. This led to some Canadian getting double benefit payments in April. The CRA rectified the error by adjusting the June payments for those who received double payments.  

The CRA will give CRB benefits 

Just like before, the CRA will rectify the CRB error when it

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

TikTok’s US ban is on hold. What comes next?

TikTok averted a ban in the United States last week when a federal judge ruled that Washington couldn’t block it from app stores just yet.



The logo of TikTok is seen on a smartphone screen in New York, the United States, Aug. 30, 2020.


© Chine Nouvelle/Sipa/Shutterstock
The logo of TikTok is seen on a smartphone screen in New York, the United States, Aug. 30, 2020.

The short-form video app is still accessible, but its fate in the country is far from certain.

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The court ruling is only temporary, and could be appealed by the US government. The ruling could also eventually be thrown out: The judge only weighed in because TikTok challenged the ban, and the company could lose its court case.

To make things more confusing, TikTok’s court case isn’t the only thing governing the future of the app.

TikTok’s Chinese owner, ByteDance, is racing to close a deal with the American firms Oracle and Walmart that might be enough to satisfy the Trump administration’s concerns about the app and stave off US pressure once and for all.

What started all of this?

US President Donald Trump and his administration have been attacking TikTok for months because of its ties to China. They claim the app is a risk to national security because the user data it stores on Americans could wind up in the hands of the Chinese government.

Those attacks came to a head in August, when Trump issued executive orders that would effectively ban TikTok in the United States. He later said that the ban could be avoided if a “very American company” buys it.

TikTok, meanwhile, has pushed back against the claim that it poses a security risk, saying that the user data it keeps on Americans is stored stateside, with a backup in Singapore. Its opposition to the ban spurred TikTok to sue the Trump administration in federal court.

What