Tag: High

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an AP test in the subject.


More from DA: Why a district launched a middle school for African American girls


And even though female students remain underrepresented in high school computer science courses, the number of students taking AP computer science exams has been growing rapidly, the report found.

Disparities would be better illuminated if schools measured disparities by determining computer science participation by students’ specific race, ethnicity and economic status, rather than by the general term “underrepresented minorities,” the report found.

The report also recommended nine policies states and districts can implement to provide equitable access to computer science:

  • Create a state plan for K–12 computer science
  • Define computer science and establish rigorous K–12 computer science standards
  • Allocate funding for rigorous computer science teacher professional learning and course support
  • Implement clear certification pathways for computer science teachers
  • Create programs at institutions of higher education to offer computer science to
13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

SANDWICH GENERATION: AARP MN pushes for access to affordable high speed internet amid pandemic

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota — AARP is fighting for access to affordable and reliable high-speed internet where you live. A strong internet connection can impact the way you work, learn, stay in touch, and even receive health care from home. However, the reality is many Minnesotans still don’t have access to reliable, high-speed broadband internet.

To identify where gaps are in coverage MN Rural Broadband Coalition is asking you to take a 30-second speed test that will measure your home internet speed and build a better broadband service map. The MN Rural Broadband Coalition launched the MN Speed Test Initiative to find out exactly where broadband service is available in our state. A simple, 30-second speed test will tell us your upload and download speed and place a dot on our map. So far, over 20,000 speed tests have been logged. Once complete, the map will help bring broadband to communities across the state.

Testing data will be statistically valid and provide a map of what service levels are for any given area in the state. This information will be an important tool for communities that are planning a high-speed internet expansion project through the FCC, USDA, or MN Border-to-Border Broadband Grant Program. To take the speed test, click here.

The Minnesota Rural Broadband Coalition is a membership group of local units of government, elected officials, economic development agencies, educational institutions, healthcare organizations, telecommunications organizations, non-profits and individuals who advocate at the State Capitol for better broadband in rural Minnesota.

AARP is the largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment.

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13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Lower Richland County can expect high speed internet next year

People who live in Lower Richland should expect to have high-speed internet access at their fingertips sometime next year.

HOPKINS, S.C. — If you’re driving down Lower Richland Boulevard or Camp Creek Road, you’ll see orange wiring going through the ground. That’s because Richland County Council contracted a private company, TruVista Telecom, to lay 55 miles of fiber optic cables. The project will provide Lower Richland residents access to high-speed internet over broadband.

“The projects are transformative in the sense that the community will have world class services in a rural setting,” said Richland County Vice-Chair, Dalhi Myers. “That is what the best rural communities offer. I think we will be able to attract people who want to be in a rural environment and want to live in the modern world.”

Myers said nearly almost all the children who grow up in Lower Richland and become adults move somewhere else because there is no access to world-class services. She believes this project allows for growth without interrupting the rural lifestyle.

RELATED: SC students are in need of internet access for distance learning

“What I would like to see is a return to a level of commerce and community growth that allows the community to remain livable for the next 100 years,” Myers explained. “Hopefully, it will not result in the kind of year over year population decline that we have consistently seen.”

People who live in Lower Richland should expect to have high-speed internet access at their fingertips sometime next year.

RELATED: Clyburn: ‘High speed internet is an essential service and our

12
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

ARK Next Generation Internet ETF (ARKW) Hits a 52-Week High

For investors seeking momentum, ARK Next Generation Internet ETF ARKW is probably a suitable pick. The fund just hit a 52-week high and is up 191.3% from its 52-week low price of $40.50/share.

Let’s take a look at the fund and its near-term outlook to gain an insight into where it might be headed:

ARKW in Focus

Companies within the fund are focused on and expected to benefit from shifting the bases of technology infrastructure to the cloud, enabling mobile, new and local services, such as companies that rely on or benefit from the increased use of shared technology, infrastructure and services, Internet-based products and services, new payment methods, big data, the Internet of things, and social distribution and media. It has AUM of $2.43 billion and charges an expense ratio of 76 basis points.

Why the Move?

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, consumers are opting for online retailers to purchase food items and other goods and are resorting to video streaming services and other modes of in-house entertainment. In line with the rising online shopping trend, customers are resorting to digital payments to clear their bills, while merchants and utility providers are advocating the same. Also, the pandemic has resulted in some changes in the lifestyle and preference of people. Most of the surveys have found that people are opting for online shopping over visiting a brick-and-mortar store for their purchases of essential food items and supplies. This is making funds like ARKW an attractive investment option.

More Gains Ahead?

It seems like the fund will remain strong, with a positive weighted alpha of 160.14  which gives cues of further rally.

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12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

It’s High Time We Got a ‘F**k Off’ Economy: Zephyr Teachout

In the 1980s, under the Reagan administration’s lax enforcement of antitrust laws, corporate mergers in the U.S. began to jump. Since then, the market power of America’s biggest corporations has only continued to increase, with this result: A tiny number of companies dominate slews of major industries—from pharmaceuticals and retailers to hospitals and meat processors to defense contractors and social media, to many, many others. This issue was thrown into stark relief during the pandemic when behemoths such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Walmart saw their market values skyrocket while smaller companies all over the country went bankrupt.

Zephyr Teachout contends that monopoly is the forgotten issue of our time.

Monopoly, argues the law professor and former New York congressional and gubernatorial candidate, is a key driver of modern society’s biggest problems, such as low wages, income inequality, financial speculation, restrictions to worker freedom, declining entrepreneurship, and racism.

With her new book, Break Em’ Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money, Teachout seeks to make anti-monopoly a top issue for progressives again. I recently spoke to her by phone about how the Left has missed the monopoly problem, why her book is more about power than economics, and why we need to strive for a “fuck off” economy.

In your introduction, you write that humans have a drive for power that must be checked or tyranny will result. Why did you start like this?

So many questions about politics, power and the economy are really questions about human nature. When we treat Jeff Bezos or Mark Zuckerberg as only about the bottom line, we’re misunderstanding motivations. It’s much more than greed. As I write in the book, these are “William the Conqueror” types. They’re out to accumulate power. We need to confront that if