Tag: Heres

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Block political texts and ads on your phone. Here’s how

Election Day is 22 days away and political ads are bombarding your Facebook feed, mailbox and now your text message inbox. Unfortunately, there isn’t a Do Not Text registry that applies to texting the same way it does to phone calls. There is, however, still a way you can attempt to stop political ads from swarming your phone.



a hand holding a cellphone: Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET



a close up of a computer keyboard: Don't click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


© Angela Lang/CNET

Don’t click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


If you’re wondering how the organization got your number in the first place, it’s because all states allow access to voter data for election purposes — so if you’re a registered voter, your information is on file. 

Here’s how to stop the unwanted political texts.

What political campaigns know about you

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Reply STOP to the sender

Usually when you receive a political text message, you can opt-out. You may see a message in the text body like “reply STOP or unsubscribe to stop receiving messages.” Before responding, however, make sure it’s a legitimate campaign number and not a scammer. If you reply to a scam message, it lets the sender know your number is active.

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You may have to text STOP multiple times if several political campaign people are reaching out to you from different numbers.

Filter out the text messages

Your smartphone has capabilities that let you filter out text messages from unknown senders. While this doesn’t stop unknown senders from texting you, it will hide the messages so you don’t have to see them. Here’s how to filter out the messages on iPhones and Android phones .

If you’re an iPhone user, open the Settings app and tap Messages.

11
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Here’s where overseas and military voters can return ballots online

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas voters the option to transmit their absentee ballots online. 

Members of the Armed Services and their families, diplomats, and private United States citizens living abroad all have the right to vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA), a law first passed in the 1980s and further expanded with the MOVE Act, which was passed by Congress in 2009.

Voters covered under UOCAVA have the option to request a ballot for every election in a given year, have that ballot mailed to them no later than 45 days before the election, return it without needing to pay postage, and also have access to a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot that they can fill out if they don’t receive the requested ballot in time.

And while all voters are required to mail their ballots by Election Day, most states also give overseas and military voters

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Here’s a first look at Google’s plans for its massive San Jose campus

  • Google released renderings for its massive downtown San Jose campus, which will face final approval in spring 2021.
  • The company’s mixed-use campus, which is in coordination with the city of San Jose, is a departure from prior campuses as more than half of it will be open to the public in some form.
  • The campus includes childcare centers, performative arts centers and ecological viewing stations.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Google releases San Jose campus rendering


© Provided by CNBC
Google releases San Jose campus rendering

Google has released a first look at its next massive campus — and it looks nothing like those before it.

The company released renderings and sketches of guidelines for its mixed-use, 80-acre campus in downtown San Jose, which will house 25,000 employees. More than half of the “Downtown West” 80-acre project — which is being built in coordination with the city of San Jose — will be allocated for residential and public space and include features like childcare centers, outdoor moving screenings and ecological viewing stations. 

“Thousands of conversations helped us hone in to what we really want in a site, which was much less the corporate campus and the financial district and much more a resilient neighborhood,” said Alexa Arena, Google’s district lead for San Jose in a video. “Downtown West is designed to be a true part of the city — the opposite of a traditional corporate campus,” lead urban designer Laura Crescimano said in a statement.

It comes a year after the company filed its initial campus framework, which kicked off formal studies and community feedback discussions.  Last month, Google launched renderings for its new town-like tech campus in Mountain View, Calif., which aims to convert 40 acres of Mountain View land into a mixed-use campus open to local residents.

Silicon Valley tech companies like Facebook and Google have begun departing

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Here’s Why You Should Be Concerned

The perilous state of IoT security, the FBI warned last December, means that “hackers can use an innocent device to do a virtual drive-by of your digital life.” A week earlier, that same FBI office had cautioned on the dangers of smart TVs, how they can allow “manufacturers, streaming services, and even hackers an open door into your home.”

A new security report from the team at Guardicore has combined those two FBI alerts, making it clear just how real those risks are, how easy it is to exploit vulnerabilities in everyday devices. And this isn’t a data theft risk—it’s much more creepy, playing like something from a spy thriller. It’s an attack scenario that “conjures up the famous ‘van parked outside’ scene in every espionage film in recent memory,” Guardicore says.

Our homes now double as our offices. Eavesdropping on those homes is as likely to compromise commercial secrets belonging to our employers as private chats or activities between family members. This wasn’t the case when the listening-in smart speaker scandals broke last year. According to Microsoft, “the first half of 2020 saw an approximate 35% increase in total [IoT] attack volume compared to the second half of 2019.”

“At the low end of the risk spectrum,” the FBI warned on smart TVs, “they can change channels, play with the volume, and show your kids inappropriate videos. In a worst-case scenario, they can turn on your bedroom TV’s camera and microphone and silently cyberstalk you.”

Now Guardicore says it has proven that a standard voice-enabled TV remote can be hijacked and used as a secret listening device, with the device accessed and attacked remotely from a vehicle out in the street. The team says it was able to remotely attack and then trigger this eavesdropping on demand, operating

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Here’s what’s happening today at TC Sessions: Mobility 2020

Mobility enthusiasts from around the world, welcome to Day One of TC Sessions: Mobility 2020! Get ready for two days of programming dedicated to the people and technology behind the transformation of transportation.

Mobility’s a rapidly evolving revolution, and we’re thrilled to have the community’s best founders, investors and technologists standing by ready to help you build your startup, expand your portfolio or take your career to the next level.

Ready to get your mobility mojo moving? Here’s a brief taste of today’s events — speakers, interviews and breakout sessions. Visit the TC Sessions: Mobility agenda, plan your day and don’t forget about the world-class networking — we built time for it into the schedule. Opportunity’s pounding on the door…fling it open, people!

Timing is everything: Check the agenda for exact times. It will automatically reflect the time zone in which you’re currently located. Okay, let’s get to the good stuff.

If autonomous vehicles drive you wild, don’t miss the conversation with Waymo COO Tekedra Mawakana. She’ll talk about plans for scaling the company’s commercial deployment, directing fleet operations and developing its business path (Main stage).

Not much happens in tech without serious cash infusions. Cue leading VCs Reilly Brennan, Amy Gu and Olaf Sakkers and get ready for a great debate — the uncertain future of mobility tech and whether VC dollars are enough to push the industry forward (Main stage).

Investing’s a hot issue that generates lots of questions. Ask yours during the interactive Q&A Session with Reilly Brennan, Amy Gu and Olaf Sakkers (Breakout).

Micromobility’s a big topic, and an even bigger industry. What opportunities exist in a saturated market? Find out during a discussion with Danielle Harris, director of mobility innovation at Elemental Excelerator; Dmitry Shevelenko, founder at Tortoise; and Avra van der Zee, head