Tag: Helps

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

‘Banks Never Ask That’ quiz helps customers outsmart scammers

Will a bank ever ask you to verify your birthday and social security number? No! A banking quiz seeks to help customers outsmart scammers.

Think you could spot a banking scam? Don’t be so sure.

Many people are falling for fake phone calls, texts, and emails that appear to come from their bank. Thousands of bank customers have lost millions of dollars to banking scams, so now the nation’s banks are rolling out a new tool to help you spot a scam.

Questions like “did you get good grades in school?” or “have a professional job?” are examples of tricks bank customers have fallen prey to.

“I got a phone call from my bank, and I knew it was my bank because I recognized their phone number,” victim Sarah Robb said.

However, it wasn’t really her bank. It was a scammer who drained Sarah’s checking account within minutes.

In recent months, Corinthia fell for a slick email claiming a problem with her account.

“It began with an email to me, and it said $499 was going to be withdrawn from my account,” Corinthia said.

But it was really a phishing scam and before Corinthia knew it, she was out $1,600.

The American Bankers Association wants to stop this growing fraud.

Next time you get onto your bank’s website or check their phone app, look for a little button that says, “would your bank really ask that?” It will take you to a quiz, and some of those questions just might stump you.

RELATED: IRS sending out letters: About one in three people will get a request for personal information

RELATED: Jury duty scammer pretended to be a deputy to lure family out of home, family says

The Banks Never Ask That website tests if you can outsmart online scammers.

For

08
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Role-playing computer game helps players understand how vaccines work on a global scale

vaccine
Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

A free game launched today allows players to role-play the deployment of a virtual vaccine to help to halt the global spread of a viral pandemic. The Vaccination Game, created by researchers at the University of Oxford’s MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, in collaboration with Goldsmiths, University of London, challenges players to figure out how they can deploy limited doses of the vaccine to best control a disease modelled on influenza.

The idea of developing a game was conceived by Professor Hal Drakesmith and colleagues who are part of a research network focussing on immunising babies and mothers to fight infections in low and middle-income countries. Following funding from, and in collaboration with the IMPRINT research network, they were able to begin development of the game.

“We originally had the idea of the game and began developing it back in 2019, with influenza as our example disease,” said Professor Drakesmith, who is based at the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine. “Then COVID-19 struck, and the ideas behind the game are obviously much more relevant.”

“Our game isn’t intended as a modelling or simulation tool, or meant to predict real-world scenarios”, Professor Drakesmith said. “Instead, we hope it’s educational, as it illustrates how vaccines can work on a global scale, and shows that precisely how a vaccine is deployed across populations can be crucial to its effectiveness”

Professor Drakesmith and his group collaborated with the Analysis, Visualisation and Informatics group, also based in the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, to develop the game. They also worked with Goldsmiths, University of London, to produce the final version based on mathematical models of how a virus spreads, and what effect a vaccine might have.

The virtual vaccine in the game is available in limited doses per

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Digital Innovation Company Helps Database Service Launch DBaaS with Remote Team

Cloud database company adopts its first distributed workforce model.

Theorem, LLC, a digital innovation and engineering company, recently partnered with the NoSQL cloud database company Couchbase to help it launch its new database as a service (DBaaS) product. Couchbase publicly announced Couchbase Cloud DBaaS, its fully managed beta DBaaS offering, in February of 2020.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005379/en/

Couchbase’s DBaaS product was developed with a remote team. (Graphic: Business Wire)

View the case study of Theorem’s work with Couchbase here: theorem.co/couchbase

Couchbase originally approached Theorem for help designing and developing a new DBaaS that leveraged Couchbase’s server and operator. The DBaaS would allow customers to easily deploy and manage Couchbase on cloud service providers such as AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. While working with Theorem, Couchbase experienced firsthand the power of Theorem’s distributed model for collaboration. As a result Couchbase decided to structure its new workforce for the DBaaS project as a remote team.

Theorem helped Couchbase make hiring decisions while expanding its globally distributed team of eight to more than 30 contributors. Theorem also implemented new sprint cadences, reporting, and review processes for Couchbase’s new service. It prototyped the Alpha version of the DBaaS software, testing core dependencies and developing towards Beta and GA releases.

Theorem’s experience and insight helped Couchbase overcome challenges with its DBaaS development, including managing complex software design while building a remote team and strong culture, which ultimately would help them in maintaining consistent workflow during a global pandemic. Couchbase realized impressive wins amid extraordinary circumstances thanks to its partnership with Theorem.

About Theorem

Theorem, LLC is an innovation and engineering firm that builds custom software for companies making bold bets to stay ahead. Through research, lean design, and agile delivery, we make great user experiences

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

PlanetCare’s Laundry Filter Helps Stop Ocean Plastic Pollution

Getting microplastics out of laundry

Illustrator: Cathryn Virginia

Mojca Zupan was a corporate lawyer doing just fine—“comfort-zone-fine,” as she puts it—in 2016, when a museum exhibit changed her life.

The Plastic Garbage Project depicts the “the origins, life cycle, sense, and senselessness of plastic products.” “I saw these big microscopic pictures of microfibers,” Zupan says of the tiny grains of plastic that slough off synthetic textiles and seep into bodies of water. “It’s ridiculous. Washing machines pollute so heavily.”

Explore dynamic updates of the earth’s key data points

She did some research. Technically, a solution for catching microfibers existed. But awareness of the issue was low. “I didn’t get the feeling that something would be done about it in the near future,” Zupan says. “I became determined to change the washing machine industry.” Within a year, Zupan had started PlanetCare and begun selling the company’s first product, a filter that attaches to household washing machines and catches those tiny, polluting microfibers before they reach the world’s oceans. 

A washing machine generates microfiber waste in the course of doing its job. By soaking, churning, and scrubbing a garment, it inevitably dislodges woven fiber particles into the laundry wastewater. 

Roughly the size of a Nalgene bottle, the PlanetCare filter sticks onto the side of the machine and has nozzles on either side connecting to the water hose and to the drain. The filter itself is a three-dimensional mesh sieve designed to catch fibers as small as 0.1 millimeters, or 90% of the microparticles that would typically flow back into the water supply. A starter pack with seven filter cartridges costs $112; people can also join as “members” for $12 a month. PlanetCare is based in Ljubljana, Slovenia, Zupan’s home, and while most of its customers are in Europe, it does ship to

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

IronSource’s LevelPlay helps mobile game and app devs score bigger ad revenues

IronSource is introducing LevelPlay as a broadly available tool to help smaller mobile game and app developers generate higher revenues from advertising.

Launched a year ago, LevelPlay is an in-app bidding tool that is now automatically enabled for every developer, giving them instant access to all bidding networks. Only the biggest publishers previously had access to LevelPlay as the company refined the technology for automating monetization.

In-app bidding flattens the traditional ad waterfall, allowing every demand source to bid for an available impression simultaneously, in real time. This shift speeds things up and increases competition for available ad impressions, which can in turn lead to an increase in revenue.

It means that at the very last second, LevelPlay can insert an ad that might generate more money than another ad would have. LevelPlay helps create more competition among advertisers looking to insert ads into developers’ apps and games. But it also runs the risk of slowing the app or game down, so it has to be handled just right.

“We’ve been working very hard with publishers to promote this agenda for all the industry to take the next step,” said IronSource VP of product Nimrod Zuta in an interview with GamesBeat. “And we believe we’ve made it. The result should be better monetization for app and game companies.”

The mobile advertising industry is facing a lot of uncertainty now that Apple has decided to make targeting individual users harder in the name of protecting user privacy. In a few months, Apple is effectively retiring the Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA). This will make it tougher for companies to decide whether to bid to get a particular ad in front of a particular user. But companies will still be able to determine whether an advertiser should bid on a user based on