Tag: heads

06
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

60 Minutes Producer Magalie Laguerre-Wilkinson Heads to Nickelodeon as VP of News Programming

The election is less than a month away, and Nickelodeon is continuing to beef up its news team as we approach the big day.

Nickelodeon announced that it is tapping 60 Minutes veteran producer and Emmy and Peabody Award-winner Magalie Laguerre-Wilkinson as vp of news programming, and as the executive producer of the recently rebooted Nick News series, which re-launched in June with the acclaimed Kids Race and Unity special, hosted by Alicia Keys and which Laguerre-Wilkinson co-executive produced.  Based in New York, Laguerre-Wilkinson will report to president of ViacomCBS Kids & Entertainment president Brian Robbins.

The network says that in this newly created role, Laguerre-Wilkinson “will spearhead Nick’s commitment of speaking to kids about the news and issues of the day they care about most, overseeing all aspects of research, development and execution of news segments across Nickelodeon’s platforms.”

“Magalie is a gifted journalist and producer with a long-proven ability to communicate the news of the day with compassion, empathy and precision” Robbins said in a statement. “Kids are well aware of the issues that affect their families and the world, and the talent and experience Magalie brings will serve as the foundation for how we aid or spark important conversations for our audience.”

Nickelodeon shares a parent company with CBS (ViacomCBS). Needless to say, it would have been more difficult for Nick to get re-launch a news operation if not for the assistance, resources, and brainpower of CBS News.

Laguerre-Wilkinson spent more than 15 years as an ap and producer on 60 Minutes stories for Ed Bradley, Lesley Stahl, Bob Simon, Steve Kroft, Anderson Cooper, and more. She was the key producer on one of the broadcast’s most memorable and inspiring stories about the Kimbanguist Symphony Orchestra in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which won Peabody and

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Decade-long Oracle-Google copyright case heads to top US court

A decade-old legal battle between Silicon Valley giants Oracle and Google over software rights moves to the Supreme Court Wednesday, in a case with enormous implications for copyright in the digital era.

The top court scheduled oral arguments in the case which dates back to a lawsuit filed in 2010 by Oracle seeking billions from Google over its use of Java programming language in its Android mobile operating system.

Two separate jury trials ended with a determination that Google’s “software interface” did not unfairly use Java code, saving the internet giant from a possible multibillion-dollar verdict.

But an appeals court in 2018 disagreed, saying the software interface is entitled to copyright protection, prompting Google to take the case to the highest US court.

Oracle, which in 2010 obtained the rights to Java when it acquired Sun Microsystems — which had supported Google’s use of Java for Android — sought $9 billion in damages in its original complaint.

Google and many Silicon Valley allies have argued that extending copyright protection to bits of code, called application programming interfaces, or APIs, would threaten innovation in the fast-evolving digital world.

According to Google, a win for Oracle would “upend the longstanding expectation of software developers that they are free to use existing computer software interfaces to build new programs.” 

The Developers Alliance, a nonprofit group which includes app makers and other tech firms, filed a supporting brief making a similar argument, arguing that “without shared APIs, every device and program is an island, and modern software development simply cannot happen.” 

– The monopoly question –

The American Antitrust Institute argued in an amicus brief that allowing Oracle to maintain copyright protection “may slow innovation and competition in software-dependent markets,” and “may cement software-based monopolies.”

The hearing comes amid heightened scrutiny of large technology