Tag: hardware

04
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Windows failed to start; Hardware or software change might be the cause

Windows can stop working, in fact, fail to start because of any hardware and software change. These changes interfere with the regular boot process, and the bootloader becomes clueless. When that happens, it becomes painful because you can get access to it. In this post, we will try to resolve the problem with the troubleshooting tips.

Windows failed to start. A recent hardware or software change might have

Windows failed to start; A recent hardware or software change might be the cause

The problem is usually with the missing bootloader or connected hardware. You will need to make a bootable USB drive to boot into advanced recovery. Since you cannot access your computer, you can use another Windows 10 PC to create the bootable disk. The options you have are:

  1. Check Hardware
  2. Automatic Repair
  3. Rebuild BCD
  4. Set Correct Boot Order

You will also need an admin account in one of the processes so make sure you remember that.

1] Set Correct Boot Order

Change Boot Order in Windows 10

When Windows starts, the bootloader looks for a set of files from where it can start loading Windows. If it will not find the right files, Windows will not load. You need to make sure that the default bootable drive is your SSD or HDD. When it’s not set as default, and you have a USB drive connected, Windows will be stuck. So boot into the BIOS using DEL or F2 key when you power up the computer, and change the order.

2] Check Hardware

If there is no Boot Order problem, you can check if there is an issue with the Hard drive. The first thing you should check the BIOS can detect it. If it does, then you need to check it with another computer. If the hard drive or SSD cannot be recognized, you have a hardware issue.

In case you are facing this on a

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

First PS5 hands-on videos show off hardware and games, but no UI

Sony has invited a number of Japanese publications and YouTubers to get a closer look at the PlayStation 5. It’s the first time we’ve seen the PS5 hardware outside of leaked images from Taiwan’s National Communications Commission. A variety of publications have now published detailed hands-on images and videos of the PS5, providing a more realistic look at how big the console is and gameplay of titles like Astro’s Playroom and Godfall.

4gamer has published photos of the PS5 standing both vertically and horizontally, demonstrating how the stand works in either position to hold the console in place. Some photos also show how the PS5 will cool itself, and 4gamer notes that it wasn’t able to hear the fan inside the console or feel much heat exhausting from it during its limited time with the hardware.

Although these PS5 previews are clearly in a very limited environment, one of 4gamer’s photos does reveal a mysterious silver latch or bolt hidden inside the top-right section of the PS5. Sony has said PS5 owners will be able to expand storage with regular SSD drives in this new console, but we’ve yet to see how this will work in reality.

Mysterious PS5 latch.
4gamer

This latch could be how you access the ability to expand PS5 storage, with it presumably allowing the side to be removed. There’s no other obvious way to slot an SSD into the PS5, but we’re still waiting on Sony to confirm how it will handle expandable storage.

We’ve known for weeks that the PS5 is the biggest console in modern history, and Dengeki Online helps put that into perspective with a shot of the PS5 next to a large TV. It’s clear if you want the PS5 to sit vertically in a TV stand then you

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Every new Alexa feature announced at Amazon’s fall hardware event: Hunches, Guard Plus and more

amazon-logo-seattle

Amazon

Amazon’s annual hardware event has come and gone, with a slew of product announcements, from a brand new Echo speaker and Echo Show display, to a cloud-based gaming platform. But the star of Amazon’s smart home is, as always, Alexa. Amazon’s voice assistant continues to expand its reach, connecting with over 140,000 smart home devices, and boasting more than 100 million Alexa-compatible devices installed across its user base. But Alexa’s power isn’t just in its rapidly growing scale and ever-expanding reach.

When I spoke to Daniel Rausch, Amazon’s vice president of smart home and Alexa mobile, before the hardware event, he said Alexa is becoming more independent too. Alexa will soon be able to act on Hunches without asking, to listen for and react to sounds other than a wake word, and to protect your home more actively with an upgrade to Alexa Guard.


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All this will lead to what Rausch called “the ambient home,” in which Alexa is “ready to respond [to voice commands], but is more predictive and proactive.”

Here are the biggest upgrades coming to Alexa.

Alexa Guard Plus

Amazon has rolled out and expanded Alexa Guard over the past couple of years to allow you to monitor your home while you’re away. While it’s activated, Guard will listen for glass breaking, smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, and footsteps and other signs of a break-in, and will send you a mobile alert.

The company is now offering something called Alexa Guard Plus, a subscription service that runs $4.99 per month, and it adds a few features on top

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Portland-based hardware security startup Eclypsium raises $13M

Yuriy Bulygin, co-founder and CEO, Eclypsium (Eclypsium Photo)

Portland, Ore.-based startup Eclypsium raised $13 million to help expand its enterprise hardware security technology.

Founded in 2017, the company helps detect, analyze, and prevent security threats at the firmware level.

Eclypsium is led by co-founder and CEO Yuriy Bulygin, a former top engineer at Intel and founder of the CHIPSEC project. He started the company with CTO Alex Bazhaniuk, another former Intel security engineer.

“The ongoing and material shift to remote work has brought new risks from remote and BYOD devices and remote access infrastructure,” Bulygin said in a Bulygin. “Traditional software security solutions don’t provide visibility into the firmware risks these devices bring to an organization. We have built world-class expertise and technology, in partnership with our customers, to address the firmware risk.”

New backers AV8 Ventures, TransLink Capital, Mindset Ventures, Alumni Ventures Group, and Ridgeline Partners invested in the round, which included participation from existing investors Intel Capital, Madrona Venture Group, Andreessen Horowitz, and Ubiquity Ventures. Total funding to date is $25 million.

Source Article

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Swarm prices out its orbital IoT network’s hardware and services

Swarm’s new network of satellites is intended to provide low-bandwidth, low-power connectivity to “Internet of Things” devices all over the world, and the company just announced how much its technology will actually cost. A $119 board will be sold to be integrated with new products, so while your home security camera won’t get it, it might be invaluable for a beehive monitor deep in an orchard or gunshot detection platform in a protected wildlife reserve.

The Swarm board is about the size of a pack of gum, and provides a constant connection at the kind of data rate and power requirement that IoT devices need — which is to say, low. After all, things like barometric pressure monitors, seismic activity detectors and vehicles that operate far from cellular coverage just send and receive a handful of bytes now and then.

Connecting those to legacy geosynchronous satellite networks is possible, of course, but also expensive, bulky and power-hungry. Swarm aims to offer a similar service for a tenth of the price; the company’s basic data plan provides up to 750 packets per month, with each packet up to 200 bytes. Not a lot, but it’s more than enough for many applications.

Swarm's tiny satellites lined up before launch.
Swarm’s tiny satellites lined up before launch.

Image Credits: Swarm

It’s important to keep costs down and connectivity up in growing industries like precision agriculture and smart maritime and logistics work. Being able to check in hourly from anywhere in the world for five bucks a month is a no-brainer for many companies that otherwise might have to go blind or pay quite a bit more for a traditional satellite link.

It’s not just the Swarm chip that’s small — the satellites themselves are too. So much so that they attracted unwanted attention from the FCC, which worried that the