Tag: Grindr

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Enormous Grindr Security Flaw Could Have Let Anyone Reset Your Password and Take Over Your Account

A serious security vulnerability in Grindr, the most popular dating app for gay, bi, trans, and queer people, has been discovered, which could have allowed anyone to infiltrate and take over a Grindr account simply by knowing the account holder’s email address.

As well as making it easy for bad actors to impersonate other people, the vulnerability would have given them easy access to potentially highly sensitive information, including the user’s HIV status, intimate pictures, dating history and sexual orientation.

In a blog post explaining how the vulnerability could be exploited, security researcher Troy Hunt described it as “one of the most basic account takeover techniques I’ve seen,” adding that “the ease of exploit is unbelievably low and the impact is obviously significant.”

He flagged the security flaw to Grindr after being tipped off by French security researcher Wassime Bouimadaghene, who had repeatedly tried to warn the company about it, only for his messages to fall on deaf ears.

Grindr has now fixed the issue, and says it doesn’t believe the vulnerability was exploited by anyone.

How the vulnerability could be exploited

Bouimadaghene had discovered it was possible to take over a Grindr account simply by entering the email address associated with the account into the Grindr password reset tool.

As well as sending a clickable link with password reset token to that email address, Grindr had been leaking the token within the browser, and Bouimadaghene worked out that he could use that to reset the password on any account, without needing to access the user’s email.

Once the password associated with an account was reset, he could easily set a new password and completely take over the account. Troy Hunt confirmed this was the case.

“We are grateful for the researcher who identified a vulnerability. The reported issue has

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

A shameful security flaw could have let anyone access your Grindr account

You would think a dating app that knows your sexuality and HIV status would take thorough precautions to keep that info protected, but Grindr has disappointed the world once again — this time, with a gobsmackingly egregious security vulnerability that could have let literally anyone who could guess your email address into your user account.





Luckily, French security researcher Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the vulnerability, perhaps before it could be exploited, and it’s now been fixed.

Unluckily for Grindr, the company ignored his disclosures — until security researcher Troy Hunt (of Have I Been Pwned) and journalist Zack Whittaker (of TechCrunch) each confirmed the issue and wrote about it.

The details need to be seen to be believed (so please look at the image below) but the short version is this: if you put an email address into Grindr’s password reset form, it would send a message back to your web browser with the key you need to reset the password buried inside it.



graphical user interface, text, application


© Provided by The Verge


You could then theoretically just copy and paste that key into a password reset URL (which Hunt did), and take over an account just like that.

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Grindr COO Rick Marini told TechCrunch that “we believe we addressed the issue before it was exploited by any malicious parties,” and says Grindr will both partner with a “leading security firm” and introduce a bug bounty program. That should hopefully mean security researchers like Bouimadaghene will have an easier time getting in touch.

Grindr data is particularly sensitive

Again, this isn’t just an app that contains a few messages. Grindr users include gay, bi, trans and queer individuals, and the mere presence of the app on a person’s phone can indicate something about their sexuality they may not want revealed to the

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Grindr flaw allowed hijacking accounts with just an email address

A Grindr vulnerability allowed anyone who knows a user’s email address to easily reset their password and hijack their account. All a bad actor needed to do was type in a user’s email address in the password reset page and then pop open the dev tools to get the reset token. By adding that token to the end of the password reset URL, they won’t even need to access the victim’s inbox — that’s the exact link sent to the user’s email anyway. It loads the page where they can input a new password, giving them a way to ultimately take over the victim’s account.



BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)


BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

A French security researcher named Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the flaw and tried to report it to the dating service. When support closed his ticket and he didn’t hear back, he asked help from security expert Troy Hunt who worked with another security expert (Scott Helme) to set up a test account and confirm that the vulnerability does exist. Hunt, who called the issue “one of the most basic account takeover techniques” he’s ever seen, managed to get in touch with Grindr’s security team directly by posting a call for their contact details on Twitter.

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While Grindr quickly fixed the issue after hearing from Hunt, the incident underscored the platform’s shortcomings when it comes to security. And that’s a huge problem when the dating app caters to individuals whose sexual orientations and identities could make them a target for harassment and violence. This isn’t the first security issue Grindr has had to deal with. Back

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Grindr fixes issue that let hackers easily hijack accounts

Illustration for article titled Serious Grindr Vulnerability Let Hackers Hijack User Accounts With Just an Email Address

Photo: Leon Neal (Getty Images)

The popular LGBT+ hook-up app Grindr has fixed a glaring security flaw that allowed hackers to take over any account if they knew the user’s registered email address, TechCrunch reports.

Wassime Bouimadaghene, a French security researcher, originally uncovered the vulnerability in September. But after he shared his discovery with Grindr and was met with radio silence, he decided to team up with Australian security expert Troy Hunt, a regional director at Microsoft and the creator of the world’s largest database of stolen usernames and passwords, Have I Been Pwned?, to draw attention to an issue that put Grindr’s more than 3 million daily active users at risk.

Hunt shared these findings with the outlet and on his website Friday, explaining that the problem stemmed from Grindr’s process for letting users reset their passwords. Like many social media sites, Grindr uses account password reset tokens, a single-use, machine-generated code to verify that the person requesting a new password is the owner of the account. When a user asks to change their password, Grindr sends them an email with a link containing the token that, once clicked, lets them reset their password and regain access to their account.

However, Bouimadaghene discovered a serious issue with Grindr’s password reset page: Instead of solely sending the password reset token to a user’s email, Grindr also leaked it to the browser. “That meant anyone could trigger the password reset who had knowledge of a user’s registered email address, and collect the password reset token from the browser if they knew where to look,” TechCrunch reports.

In short, just by knowing the email address a user had associated with their Grindr account, a hacker could easily create their own clickable