Tag: great

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Netflix Thinks It’s So Great You Don’t Even Need to Check Out How Great It Is

If you haven’t yet subscribed to any of the major streaming services, first I have to ask: How have you avoided them? Second: You’ve missed the boat when it comes to trying the biggest names for free.



a screen shot of a computer


© Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP (Getty Images)


Streaming giant Netflix quietly did away with its 30-day trial in the U.S., according to CNET, just like Disney+, which stopped offering free trials back in June. The U.S. is not the only market where Netflix has decided to end its free trial. The company ended trial periods in Mexico and several other countries as far back as two years ago.

“Free trials are not available, but you can still sign up and take advantage of all Netflix has to offer,” Netflix’s free trial help page now reads. In a statement to CNET, a Netflix spokesperson said the company is currently looking at differen marketing promotions in the U.S. to “attract new members and give them a great Netflix experience.”

If you’re disappointed, that’s understandable. Who doesn’t like to get something for free, even if it’s for a limited time? If you’re planning on signing up for your own Netflix account, you’ll need to shell out a minimum of $9 month.

This might have to do with the fact that Netflix is currently offering specific TV shows and movies to watch for free, which it began doing in August. Current free titles include Stranger Things, Bird Box, and When They See Us, which, honestly, are worth watching whether you want to pay for Netflix or not.

It’s also worth noting that several other streaming services still offer free trials. Hulu offers one month free, while CBS All Access, Shudder, and HBO Max offer a free week. And Peacock offers an entire free tier, which

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

An app that let Chinese users bypass the Great Firewall and access Google, Facebook has disappeared

  • A web browser called Tuber, backed by Qihoo 360, allowed Chinese users to access foreign websites such as YouTube and Facebook.
  • Google, Facebook and Twitter are all blocked in China due to the country’s Great Firewall. They can usually only be accessed via virtual private networks or VPNs.
  • The Tuber browser has now disappeared from app stores and its website no longer works.



a close up of a sign: In this photo illustration a logo of the American multinational technology company and search engine Google is seen on an Android mobile device with People's Republic of China flag in the background.


© Provided by CNBC
In this photo illustration a logo of the American multinational technology company and search engine Google is seen on an Android mobile device with People’s Republic of China flag in the background.

GUANGZHOU, China — An app that briefly gave Chinese internet users access to foreign websites such as YouTube and Facebook — services that have long been blocked — has now disappeared.

The web browser called Tuber was backed by Qihoo 360, a Chinese cybersecurity giant. On Oct. 9, a journalist at the state-backed tabloid the Global Times

about its launch.

China’s so-called Great Firewall blocks websites such as Facebook and its services like Instagram as well as Google and Twitter. Content on Chinese websites is also heavily censored, particularly if it is deemed politically sensitive by Beijing.

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A virtual private network or VPN is required to access any blocked sites in China. But the Tuber app allowed users to access these services without a VPN.

There were some caveats to the Tuber app however. Users had to register with their identity card information and phone number, according to Reuters and TechCrunch, which both tested the app.

Search results on YouTube for politically sensitive phrases such as “Tiananmen” and “Xi Jinping” returned no results on the Tuber app, according to TechCrunch.

The Tuber app was available on the Huawei app store but was no longer there when CNBC checked

11
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Ask These 4 Questions to Design a Great SaaS Website Copy

SaaS websites need to be special.

There’s always a temptation to focus heavily on what your software does: the technology used in your processes, the features of your offering, etc. Those things are great – and they can serve as validation of your offering’s value.

But it’s important to put your own preconceptions aside when you’re designing your SaaS website. If you don’t intentionally work to view your website from an objective perspective, your site will almost certainly have too much jargon, be too complicated to navigate, or even miss your target demographic entirely.

With that in mind, here are four questions to ask when designing and building a website for your SaaS company. These questions will give you the perspective you need in order to find out if your website design is optimal.

1. Does your SaaS website make a great first impression?

Here’s a fact that keeps web designer up at night: from the first click a user makes onto your site, you have between 50 milliseconds and 6 seconds to create a positive first impression. Clearly, that’s not a ton of time. How are you going to impress that visitor in such a short time span?

Here’s how:

And here are three examples I like:

bambooHR

Why I like it: it’s simple and it captures the core of the product. The image conveys the brand’s purpose and ethos, and the clear CTAs are focused on a free trial (which tends to be a good hook for SaaS products).

SpringSled

Why I like it: wow, this is simple. It gets the message across so clearly and quickly, and aligns really well with the theme of the product, which is (no surprise) simplicity.

WISTIA

Why I like it: the tagline is really simple, and the messaging is really consistent

11
Oct
2020
Posted in gadget

Google’s new streaming TV gadget is a great alternative to Roku or Amazon Fire TV

  • The Chromecast with Google TV is a real rival to the Roku and Amazon Fire TV now.
  • It finally runs software, called Google TV, that lets you browse shows, movies and apps.
  • It costs $50, and CNBC has been testing it for over a week. Here’s what it’s like.



graphical user interface, website: Chromecast with Google TV


© Provided by CNBC
Chromecast with Google TV

The new $50 Chromecast with Google TV is Google’s first real rival to Roku and Amazon Fire TV. 

It brings a lot of features that never existed on a Chromecast before, such as a full remote and brand-new Google TV software that makes it easier to find movies and TV shows. And it ties into all sorts of services, such as Hulu, HBO Max, Netflix and Disney+.

Previously, the Chromecast let you play content on your computer, but you had to select content on your phone. Now it has a whole new software experience, which makes it feel a lot more like a Roku, an Amazon Fire TV or an Apple TV. It means Google might finally be able to take some market share away from leaders Amazon and Roku.

Here’s what you need to know about it.

What’s good about the Chromecast with Google TV



a video game remote control: Chromecast with Google TV


© Provided by CNBC
Chromecast with Google TV

The new Chromecast is super simple to use. You just plug it in to your TV’s HDMI port — every modern TV has one — and turn it on.

The Google TV software has seven menu options at the top of the screen that are really straightforward: Search, For You, Live, Movies, Shows, Apps and Library. I like that the “For You” page pulls in movies and TV shows from subscriptions you pay for, such as Hulu or Netflix, and that you don’t have to open those apps to

05
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Safety panel has “great concern” about NASA plans to test Moon mission software

Teams at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility move the Core Stage toward a barge in January that will carry it to a test stand in Mississippi.
Enlarge / Teams at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility move the Core Stage toward a barge in January that will carry it to a test stand in Mississippi.

NASA

An independent panel that assesses the safety of NASA activities has raised serious questions about the space agency’s plan to test flight software for its Moon missions.

During a Thursday meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, one of its members, former NASA Flight Director Paul Hill, outlined the panel’s concerns after speaking with managers for NASA’s first three Artemis missions. This includes a test flight of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft for Artemis I, and then human flights on the Artemis II and III missions.

Hill said the safety panel was apprehensive about the lack of “end-to-end” testing of the software and hardware used during these missions, from launch through landing. Such comprehensive testing ensures that the flight software is compatible across different vehicles and in a number of different environments, including the turbulence of launch and maneuvers in space.

“The panel has great concern about the end-to-end integrated test capability plans, especially for flight software,” Hill said. “There is no end-to-end integrated avionics and software test capability. Instead, multiple and separate labs, emulators, and simulations are being used to test subsets of the software.”

The safety panel also was struggling to understand why, apparently, NASA had not learned its lessons from the recent failed test flight of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft, Hill said. (Boeing is also the primary contractor for the Space Launch System rocket’s core stage).

Prior to a test flight of the Starliner crew capsule in December 2019, Boeing did not run integrated, end-to-end tests for the mission that was supposed to dock with the International Space Station. Instead of running a software test that encompassed